Naturally-Produced Organohalogens

Overview

Should the production and use of chlorine and all chlorinated organic compounds be halted, in view of their adverse effects on the environment and human health?
Those in favour argue that certain chlorinated compounds (PCBs, DDT, CFCs, etc.) have large negative environmental effects. The use of chlorine in disinfectants leads to the production of chloroform, while bulk products (PVC) contribute to the production of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins...

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Hardcover (1995)
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Overview

Should the production and use of chlorine and all chlorinated organic compounds be halted, in view of their adverse effects on the environment and human health?
Those in favour argue that certain chlorinated compounds (PCBs, DDT, CFCs, etc.) have large negative environmental effects. The use of chlorine in disinfectants leads to the production of chloroform, while bulk products (PVC) contribute to the production of chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans when they are burned.
Those against argue that chlorine and many chlorinated compounds are essential in the control of human health (the prevention of disease transmitted through drinking water that has not been disinfected), and that chlorinated compounds are indispensable intermediates in many production processes, representing a vast economic value.
But such discussions often ignore the fact that Nature contributes significantly to the production of chlorinated organic compounds. More than 1000 such compounds are known, and their contribution to the biogeochemical cycling of chlorine is underestimated. Chlorine is organically bound in large quantities to humic materials, and natural production mechanisms are known for low molecular weight compounds (methyl chloride, chloroform, chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans). The role of these compounds in the environment is largely unknown.
Naturally-Produced Organohalogens gives a complete overview of the present state of knowledge on the subject, giving a much needed balance to the argument sketched out above.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The proceedings of a conference in Delft, the Netherlands, originally inspired by the discovery of more organohalogen compounds in the terrestrial environment than could be accounted for by all the known emissions of artificial chlorinated compounds such as PCB, DDT, and CFC. Once naturally occurring compounds were detected and measured, it was discovered that considerable knowledge about their cycling within and between environmental compartments had already been compiled in analytical chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology, soil science, and other disciplines. The 40 selected and revised papers discuss the characterization and production of natural organohalogens; mechanisms for their incorporation into organic substances; their occurrence in the terrestrial, marine, and atmospheric environments; and the significance for policy relating to regulation and control of the anthrogenic production. Begins a new series. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780792334354
  • Publisher: Springer Netherlands
  • Publication date: 5/29/1995
  • Series: Environment & Chemistry Series , #1
  • Edition description: 1995
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 437
  • Product dimensions: 1.06 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 9.21 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface. 1: General Introduction and Overview Articles. A. Grimvall, D.B. Harper, G. Asplund, C. Grøn. 2: Characterization of Organohalogens of Natural Origin. R.L. Malcolm, J.P. Croue, M. Benedicte, W.M.G.M. van Loon, J.J. Boon, B. de Groot, A.J. Bulterman, C. Johansson, H. Borén, A. Grimvall, O. Dahlman, R. Mörck, A. Reimann, R.L. Malcolm, O. Hjelm, G. Asplund, K. Laniewski, S. Jonsson, L. von Sydow, P.K.G. Manninen, M. Lauren. 3: Natural Production of Organohalogens Normally Considered to be of Anthropogenic Origin. R.E. Alcock, K.C. Jones, A.E. Johnston, E.J. Hoekstra, P. Lassen, J.G.E. van Leeuwen, E.W.B. de Leer, L. Carlsen. 4: Mechanisms for the Incorporation of Halogens into Organic Substances. J.M. Bollag, J. Dec, M.D.R. Pizzigallo, P. Ruggiero, C. Crecchio, R. Mininni, P. Lassen, A. Randall, O. Jørgensen, P. Warwick, L. Carlsen, J.-H. van Pée, H.-J. Hecht, T. Haag, O. Pfeifer, R. Bantleon, H. Sobek, I. Pelletier, J. Altenbuchner, J. Hejzlar, H. Borén, A. Grimvall, J.T.G. Hamilton, O. Flynn, M.J. Larkin, D.B. Harper, J. Dolfing, W. Salomons. 5: Occurrence and Production of Organohalogens in the Terrestrial Environment. K.C. Engvild, D.B. Harper, T. Vartiainen, K. Takala, P. Kauranen, E. de Jong, J.A. Field, H.E. Spinnler, A.E. Cazemier, J.A.M. de Bont, G. Nkusi, G. Müller, K.A. Reid, R.D. Bowden. 6: Occurrence and Production of Organohalogens in the Marine Environment. R.M. Moore, R. Tokarczyk, V.K. Tait, M. Poulin, C. Geen, E. Fogelqvist, T. Tanhua, C. Wesén, H. Mu, P. Sundin, O. Ringstad, G. Odham, A. Abrahamsson, A. Ekdahl, J. Collén, M. Pedersén, E. Fahlström, M. Kawano, H. Yoshioka, Y. Tejima, R. Tatsukawa, S. Jonsson, I, Pavasars, C. Johansson, H. Borén, A. Grimvall, Y. Izumi, R. Wever. 7: Reactive Chlorine and Halogenated Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere. W.C. Keene, W. Behnke, V. Scheer, C. Zetzsch, S.T. Sturges, G.F. Cota, R.H.A. Brown, J.N. Cape, J.G. Farmer. 8: Policy Aspects. J.A. Wesseldijk, R.L. Stringer, P.A. Johnston, M. Bovenkerk.
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