Nature of Alaska: An Introduction to Familiar Plants and Animals and Natural Attractions

Nature of Alaska: An Introduction to Familiar Plants and Animals and Natural Attractions

by James Kavanagh, Raymond Leung
     
 


America’s last frontier is one of the great natural areas on earth. Alaska’s rugged mountain ranges, lush forests, muskeg-bogs and open tundra are home to a rich array of wildlife including 105 species of mammals, 325 birds, hundreds of fresh- and saltwater fishes and thousands of trees, shrubs and wildflowers. This beautifully illustrated field guide… See more details below

Overview


America’s last frontier is one of the great natural areas on earth. Alaska’s rugged mountain ranges, lush forests, muskeg-bogs and open tundra are home to a rich array of wildlife including 105 species of mammals, 325 birds, hundreds of fresh- and saltwater fishes and thousands of trees, shrubs and wildflowers. This beautifully illustrated field guide highlights more than 325 familiar plants and animals and dozens of the state’s outstanding natural attractions. It is an indispensable single reference for amateur naturalists, students and tourists alike.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781583552995
Publisher:
Waterford Press Ltd.
Publication date:
11/01/2005
Series:
Waterford Press Field Guides Series
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
453,621
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author


Zoologist James Kavanagh has researched and written more than 450 publications pertaining to wildlife observation and outdoor recreation. His unique talent is in taking complex information and synthesizing the salient points to make knowledge about nature and the outdoors more accessible to novices, and to present quick, portable reference information for more experienced wildlife and outdoor enthusiasts. His books have sold more than 5 million copies worldwide.

Read an Excerpt

BEARS
This group includes the largest terrestrial carnivores in the world. All are heavy-bodied, large-headed animals, with short ears and small tails. Their sense of smell is keen, though eyesight is generally poor. Key places to view vears are listed in the section on natural attractions.
Brown Bear, Ursus arctos
Size: 6-9 ft. (1.8-2.7 m)
Description: Distinguished by its large size, prominent shoulder hump and huge feet with prominent claws.
Habitat: Open habitats and forested areas throughout most of the state excluding the southeasternmost islands.
Comments: Three subspecies of brown bear are found in Alaska. One group lives in coastal areas and feeds primarily on salmon. A second group (often called 'grizzlies') are found in inland and northern habitats; these are typically smaller since they have less protein in their diet. A third group found on Kodiak Osland are classified as a separate subspecies since they are physically isolated. The huge Kodiak Island brown bears are considered the largest land carnivores in the world. Though the polar bear (U. maritimus) is larger still, it is considered a marine mammal.

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