The nature of man; studies in optimistic philosophy

The nature of man; studies in optimistic philosophy

by Elie Metchnikoff
     
 

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This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back

Overview

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940019185115
Publisher:
New York, Putnam
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
560 KB

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CHAPTER II HARMONIES AND DISHARMONIES AMONGST BEINGS INFERIOR TO MAN The organised world before the appearance of man on the earth Absence of a law of universal progress Fertilisation of vanilla The part played by insects in the fertilisation of orchids Mechanism by which insects carry the pollen of orchids Habits of fossorial wasps Harmonies in nature Useless organs Rudiments of the pollinia of orchids Disharmonies in nature Unadapted insects Aberration of instincts -Perversion of sexual instinct Attraction of insects by light Luminous insects Law of natural selec- tion Happiness and unhappiness in the organised world Long before man appeared on the earth animals and plants were distributed over it. Some of these were endowed with but vague senses, while others had well-developed instincts, and some even a certain degree of intelligence which they applied for their self-preservation and for the propagation of their own kind. Many species, well adapted for the resistance of external influences, have survived from very early times to the present day. In the Carboniferous period birds and mammals did not yet exist, and the thick forests, with undergrowths of gigantic ferns, were inhabited by large numbers of articulated animals, amongst which were scorpions and insects. The scorpions of that time resemble in every way those that actually live at the present day in tropical countries ; and amongst the insects of that early epoch were some very like the cockroaches of to-day. Certain tree-like ferns of the present time are also very similar to those of the coal period. Amongst the animals the bodies of which are protected by a shell, such as foraminifera and mollusca, certain specieshave survived even from an earlier time than the coal period. In contrast with t...

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