Nature Recycles: How about You?

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Overview

From sea urchins in the Atlantic Ocean to bandicoots on the Australian savanna, animals recycle all over the world. Explore how different animals in different habitats use recycled material to build homes, protect themselves, and get food. This fascinating collection of animal facts will teach readers about the importance of recycling and inspire them to take part in protecting and conserving the environment by recycling in their own way.

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Overview

From sea urchins in the Atlantic Ocean to bandicoots on the Australian savanna, animals recycle all over the world. Explore how different animals in different habitats use recycled material to build homes, protect themselves, and get food. This fascinating collection of animal facts will teach readers about the importance of recycling and inspire them to take part in protecting and conserving the environment by recycling in their own way.

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Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
Reuse and recycling happen throughout the natural world; you should do it, too. Spread by spread, a collection of curious animal behaviors and the endless loop of the water cycle are offered as examples of recycling in the natural world. From a decorator sea urchin, protected by his collection of ocean refuse, to an Asian elephant's meal of the banana leaf she first used as a fan, the text and slightly cartoony illustrations offer varied images of adaptive reuse. The animals are treated as individuals with intention. "Hermit crab helps keep the earth beautiful too." A quiz in the end matter makes the point explicit: Animals "recycle for nests or shelters, camouflage or protection, as tools, or as nutrients." Some may find this definition of recycling far-fetched and irresponsibly anthropomorphic, but the wide-ranging examples are intriguing. An elf owl makes its nest in an old woodpecker hole in a Sonoran Desert cactus. In the Indian Ocean, a veined octopus carries empty coconut halves to use as an emergency hiding place. In Africa, a dung beetle feeds its hatchlings "rhino poop." The final page shows a diverse group of young humans washing a bicycle with rags from outgrown clothes. "I recycle. How about you?" But why humans should do this is not explained. Well-meant but not convincing. (Informational picture book. 5-9)
Children's Literature - Kristi Bernard
In order to preserve the planet, humans and animals alike should do everything they can to help. Can animals pick up and clean debris and recycle like humans can? The answer is yes and they've been doing it for a long time. If you should visit the desert be mindful of large mounds of hot sand scorched by the sun. Inside you may find termites burrowing deep inside, and when they abandon their home snakes, birds and mammals move in. Deep in the rainforest the poison dart frog carries his tadpole babies on his back, and when it rains leaves fill with water where he places his young so they can swim. When the blue and gold macaw crack open nuts the shells fill with water and the frogs can use the shell as pools for their tadpoles when they fill with water. The dung beetle rolls rhino poop into balls and eats the waste of grass eating animals in the grasslands. In the burrow the dung beetle feeds its hatchlings. The beetle reduces the amount of waste and returns nutrients to the soil which is good for the earth. There are lots of creatures that recycle. The earth even recycles water with rain, sleet or snow. The back of the book has a "Creative Minds" section which helps readers understand why animals recycle. There is also a helpful map on where these animals are found around the world. A recycling questionnaire can also be found to test readers' knowledge. Kids will love the vivid illustrations. Parents and teachers can use this tool to educate children on the importance of recycling. Reviewer: Kristi Bernard
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3—Cohn uses captivating, easy-to-understand language to explore animal migration. Each entry introduces a different animal's habitat and eating, hibernating, and breeding behaviors. Children will enjoy the passages on well-known creatures, such as snakes and salamanders, in addition to those on the lesser-known chimney swifts. The section on salamanders is reminiscent of Sarah Marwil Lamstein's Big Night for Salamanders (Boyds Mills, 2010). Detwiler's vibrant, full-page illustrations bring Cohn's text to life, placing kids in the center of each environment. Written in clear, lively prose, Nature Recycles is an ideal book to introduce recycling. By showcasing the various methods animals use to repurpose materials in their natural habitats, Lord provides examples of recycling that will inspire youngsters to creatively reuse their own objects. For example, readers learn that poison dart frogs reuse bromeliad plant leaves and nut pods from the rainforest as cradles for their young. Morrison's full-page illustrations are bright and appealing, with accurate depictions of the ingenious ways creatures use found materials. Back matter offers downloadable activities, questions, trivia, and lists of facts. Wonderful additions to public or school libraries.—Anne Barreca, New York Public Library
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781607186151
  • Publisher: Sylvan Dell Publishing
  • Publication date: 2/28/2013
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 5 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: 600L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.80 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 22, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    Review: We reviewed the paper back copy of this book. ¿Nature

    Review: We reviewed the paper back copy of this book. “Nature Recycles How About You” presents recycling in the animal world and challenges us to recycle too. The repetitive text makes it a good read aloud for small children to join in and repeat with you. Large full color illustrations are bright and cheery, drawing you into the page. Young children will enjoy the illustrations and older children will learn of the many different ways to recycle.

    There are teacher helps at the end of the book that would be good to integrate into the classroom. Children will leave the book with a new sense of recycling and perhaps find ways to recycle things in their own way as well. (reviewed by Claudette Delorge, Librarian)

    DISCLOSURE: A complimentary copy of Nature Recycles. How About You? was provided by Sylvan Dell Publishing in exchange for our honest review. Opinions expressed are solely those of the reviewer.

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