Navajo Code Talkers (We the People) by Andrew Santella, Hardcover | Barnes & Noble
Navajo Code Talkers (We the People)

Navajo Code Talkers (We the People)

by Andrew Santella
     
 

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Explains the role that a group of Navajo Native Americans took in World War II, who sent secretly coded messages based on the Navajo language, helping the United States and its allies win the war.

Overview

Explains the role that a group of Navajo Native Americans took in World War II, who sent secretly coded messages based on the Navajo language, helping the United States and its allies win the war.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Usually, people who risk their lives for their county are honored. However, this has not been true for the Navajo Code Talkers. This group of Native Americans was indispensable to the United States during World War II. Without them, the war in the South Pacific would have been lost. The Navajo culture was at risk of dying out. Navajo schools, run by the government, were not even allowed to teach the Navajo language. During the war, however, it was this language that saved many US soldiers. Navajo Marines used the English alphabet and Navajo words to construct an indecipherable code. This allowed American troops to pass messages without fear of interception. This book in the "We the People" series examines this little known group. This book is easy to read and visually interesting. The text has a good balance of simple language and complex ideas. It is illustrated with historical photographs and graphs explaining the code. While the glossary is very small, the other reference tools are very informative. It even has a web site that will help with additional research. This is an excellent book, especially for struggling readers. 2004, Compass Point Books, Ages 8 to 11.
—Heather Robertson
School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-According to Marine Major Howard Connor, "Were it not for the Navajo, the Marines would have never taken Iwo Jima." During that battle, "six code talkers worked day and night to send more than 800 messages. They made not a single mistake." The code, based on the Navajo language, was so successful that the enemy never broke it. Consequently, the army did not want to reveal its existence, and it was not until 1969 that the Navajo contribution began to be acknowledged; Presidents Reagan, Clinton, and Bush have honored these men with a holiday, an act of Congress, and Congressional gold medals in retrospect. Their story is told with brevity and directness and illustrated with archival war photos, a sample of the code, and other documents and maps. This is a high-interest topic and a good first source that will certainly spark imaginations. Nathan Aaseng's Navajo Code Takers (Walker, 1992) and Deanne Durrett's Unsung Heroes of World War II: The Story of the Navajo Code Talkers (Facts On File, 1998) are for older readers but could be used in conjunction with this title.-Dona Ratterree, New York City Public Schools Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780756506117
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
01/01/2004
Series:
Capstone We the People Series
Pages:
24
Sales rank:
1,204,869
Product dimensions:
7.80(w) x 9.22(h) x 0.34(d)
Lexile:
1020L (what's this?)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Meet the Author


Andrew Santella writes for magazines and newspapers, including GQ and the New York Times Book Review. He is the author of a number of books for young readers. He lives outside Chicago with his wife and son.

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