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Navajo Year, Walk Through Many Seasons
     

Navajo Year, Walk Through Many Seasons

by Nancy Bo Flood, Billy Whitethorne (Illustrator)
 

For the Navajo people, the new year begins in October, when summer meets winter. The Navajo Year follows the Navajo calendar, and provides poetic descriptions of the many sights, sounds, and activities associated with each month. In November, there are string games and stories; in April, planting of corn, beans, and squash; and in July, rodeos and monsoon rains.

Overview

For the Navajo people, the new year begins in October, when summer meets winter. The Navajo Year follows the Navajo calendar, and provides poetic descriptions of the many sights, sounds, and activities associated with each month. In November, there are string games and stories; in April, planting of corn, beans, and squash; and in July, rodeos and monsoon rains. Follow Coyote through the year, and explore how the Navajos observe the rites and passages of each month.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Coyote accompanies the reader on a walk through many seasons. Beginning with the vibrant colors of October, the Navajo year walks forward to winter. Between yellow summer and white winter is the great season for shoe games and string games; for sacred tales and star stories. Coyote longs for a snug, warm Hogan, because now is the season of short-light, long-dark days. January means carrying buckets of snow to melt into buckets of water. By April, the cold walks away, and warmth returns as the time for planting corn, beans, and squash arrives. Each season gives way to the next as jackrabbits dodge from Coyote’s hungry eyes. She keeps the reader walking as she searches for food for her newborn pups. She gazes at all the harvest of September, intending to eat as much as possible, because she needs a full, fat stomach. Now is also the season for yellow-orange school buses that gobble up children. Yellow summer stops and steps back as white winter walks forward again. Nancy Bo Flood teaches at a Navajo college in Arizona. She incorporates lyrical, poetic descriptions of sights and sounds of each new season. Her storytelling serves to bridge understanding between cultures. Billy Whitethorne attempts to determine the many separate colors that brighten the landscape of his Arizona home and to apply it to his art. Reviewer: JoAn Watson Martin
School Library Journal
Gr 2-5-This title is partially successful in its attempts to describe the events that occur throughout the year on the Navajo Reservation. The text follows Coyote as he introduces each month, given in English and Navajo, but with no pronunciation guide. It contains a great deal of information and some truly lovely verbal descriptions, but occasionally it's too long to hold a young audience. Cultural traditions mentioned are not explained. Navajo artist Whitethorne's illustrations, however, are quite effective. The desert landscape comes alive with bright, stunning colors. Coyote sometimes seems a little out of place, looking more cartoonish than realistic, but the overall impression is one of a beautiful desert home.-S K Joiner, Brazoria County Library System, Angleton, TX Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781893354067
Publisher:
Salina Bookshelf, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/2006
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.10(w) x 10.60(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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