The Navigator: A Kurt Austin Adventure (NUMA Files Series)

The Navigator: A Kurt Austin Adventure (NUMA Files Series)

4.1 51
by Clive Cussler, Paul Kemprecos
     
 

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A search for a relic that could change history?

A hunt for the truth that few will survive?

Overview

A search for a relic that could change history?

A hunt for the truth that few will survive?

Editorial Reviews

Years before the current Gulf war, a diminutive statue was stolen from the Baghdad Museum. For some reason, this missing Phoenician icon has recently attracted marked interest among men not readily identifiable as art connoisseurs. In fact, the men who seek the so-called Navigator are ruthless killers who have already struck once. Saving the life of a UN investigator, Curt Austin and Zavala learn of this homicidal quest firsthand, thus beginning NUMA's full immersion into a mystery of Da Vinci Code dimensions. A rip-roaring Clive Cussler page-turner.
Publishers Weekly

Fans of action-hero Kurt Austin of the National Underwater and Maritime Agency expect imaginative plotting, but it never comes down the chute in this seventh NUMA Files novel from bestseller Cussler and Shamus-winner Kemprecos (after Polar Shift). Austin and his team are hunting icebergs when they chance upon a pirate raid aimed at stealing a priceless Phoenician antiquity launched by a stereotypical megalomaniacal villain, Viktor Baltazar, who believes he's a descendant of King Solomon. Baltazar and Austin joust continually (once, literally!) over the antique, which may be connected to the lost ark of the covenant, Thomas Jefferson and the suspicious death of Meriwether Lewis. Sequences including the attempted human sacrifice of the requisite gorgeous female U.N. investigator are all too predictable, and the writing ("The Filipino's lips curved like slices of liverwurst in a frying pan") is often less than Cussler's best. (June)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Library Journal
The NUMA team is back, trying to figure out why anyone would kill for a little statue stolen years ago from the Baghdad Museum. Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
A super-evil, swarthy zillionaire locks horns with the super-good, fabulously resourceful Kurt Austin (Polar Shift, 2005, etc.) of the National Underwater and Maritime Agency (NUMA). It seems there has been yet another age-old conspiracy to cover up a truth which would rock the religious world. This tale is based on the possibility that the Phoenicians, master mariners of the ancient world, were repeat visitors to North America, sailing nearly to Harrisburg, Pa., and on the further possibility that one of those voyages involved a treasure so important that it was necessary to secrete the object not far from what would be the Pennsylvania Statehouse, where it might have rested for eternity were it not for the restless curiosity of President Thomas Jefferson, or for the avaricious lust of cruel, present-day international villain Viktor Baltazar. Baltazar has inserted himself into the life and work of fiery, spunky, Italo-Ethiopian UNESCO employee Carina Mechadi, a woman totally and passionately dedicated to the restoration of Iraqi antiquities dispersed in the chaos of war. The ruthless fiend desperately wants his hands on the ancient statue of a Phoenician mariner that Carina plans to exhibit. Baltazar's brutal efforts to snatch the statue in the middle of the Atlantic put Carina in the way of a Fate Worse Than Death. Fortunately, NUMA's number one agent Kurt Austin just happens to be in the nautical neighborhood, where he has been lassoing a gigantic iceberg, and he is more than capable of overpowering Baltazar's goons. Mechadi and Austin, mutually attracted, team up to find out what's so interesting about that statue, embroiling them in Baltazar's machinations from the Bosphorus toChesapeake Bay. Those machinations include tilting on horseback. No kidding. A small-very small-step up from Saturday morning adventure cartoons. First printing of 600,000

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781597224833
Publisher:
Gale Group
Publication date:
06/05/2007
Series:
NUMA Files Series, #7
Edition description:
Large Print
Pages:
647
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 1.30(d)

Meet the Author

Clive Cussler is the author of many New York Times bestsellers, most recently The Spy and Lost Empire. He lives in Arizona.
Paul Kemprecos has coauthored all five previous NUMA Files novels with Cussler and is a Shamus Award-winning author of six underwater detective thrillers.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Phoenix, Arizona
Date of Birth:
July 15, 1931
Place of Birth:
Aurora, Illinois
Education:
Pasadena City College; Ph.D., Maritime College, State University of New York, 1997

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Navigator 4.1 out of 5 based on 2 ratings. 51 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I picked up a Cussler book one day in the mark downs and I am hooked. I have read many of the Dirk Pitt adventures and also Kurt Austin,the Numa files. They are all exciting and quite informative books. Cussler always inserts truthes into his books as well as fiction.The Navigator starts in Iraq after the fall of Saddham Hussein and the sacking of the Baghdad museum.It takes the reader on a journey in search of an ancient Phoenician statue intertwined with our own Thomas Jefferson. It's a great book as are all Cussler's books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great story that mixes fact with fiction along with adventure. I always find the Cussler books very fun to read because it takes me to places I have seen or would like to see. It also transports me to other times and places setting the "stage" for the main story. The charectors are fun to imagine and at times are bigger than life like most lead charectors can be. I like the twists and turns in the story line and to see how things come together at the climax of the story. I would recommend any of the other Clive Cussler books.
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Chuck56 More than 1 year ago
This was an entertaining read, and a good rainy day book. However, the premise, as so often happens, is a bit of a stretch. I don't want to reveal anything, BUT  the rationale at the end is questionable if not laughable.  Also some of the language and events are not quite Cussler's best work, as the one revview states.
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Classic Kurt and joe.
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