The Nazi Hunter

The Nazi Hunter

3.4 13
by Alan Elsner
     
 

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A gripping thriller, The Nazi Hunter mixes fierce partisan Washington politics, the search for ex-Nazi criminals, and a crazed, right-wing militia intent on bringing down the government. Nicknamed “the Nazi Hunter,” Marek Cain, deputy director of the Office of Special Investigations at the Justice Department, has for ten years been the point man

Overview


A gripping thriller, The Nazi Hunter mixes fierce partisan Washington politics, the search for ex-Nazi criminals, and a crazed, right-wing militia intent on bringing down the government. Nicknamed “the Nazi Hunter,” Marek Cain, deputy director of the Office of Special Investigations at the Justice Department, has for ten years been the point man for tracking down ex-Nazis who have fraudulently entered the United States since World War II and bringing them to justice.

One late afternoon, a distraught German woman eludes security and slips into Cain’s office. “I have documents,” she says, “important documents only for the Nazi Hunter.” She promises to bring them the next day. When she doesn’t show, he dismisses her as just another crackpot. But when he reads in the Washington Post the next morning that the woman has been brutally murdered, he senses he’s on to something big. He must find those documents. The trail leads from Washington to Miami to Boston, back to the Belzec concentration camp in Poland, where half a million Jews were murdered in the winter of 1942, and into the lair of America’s fascist militias.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

At the start of this gripping debut thriller set in 1994, a German-accented woman named Sophie Reiner appears at the desk of Marek Cain, a Nazi hunter in the U.S. Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations, and tells Marek that she can deliver smoking gun documents concerning Belzec, an extermination camp in Poland where half a million Jews were murdered in 1942. Marek is extremely interested, both professionally and personally: his own grandparents perished at Belzec. The next day, Sophie turns up dead in her hotel room, where the police find a CD of Argentinean baritone Roberto Delatrucha singing Schubert lieder.The possible Argentinean connection sets off alarms for the veteran investigator, and soon he's hot on the trail of the famous singer. Subplots involving neo-Nazis out to blow up Washington, and the newly elected Republican congress threatening to cut off OSI funding add suspense, but it's Marek's quest to expose Delatrucha's past that drives this compelling tale. Elsner is also the author of Gates of Injustice: The Crisis in America's Prisonsand Guarded by Angels, a Holocaust family chronicle. (July)

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Kirkus Reviews
In this entertaining but flawed debut novel, Marek Cain, deputy director of the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations, races to expose aging Nazis before they die off. It's late 1994, and Cain's job is complicated by the recent Republican Revolution and new House Speaker Mitch Conroy, self-righteous crusader against big government. One afternoon, a German woman arrives in Cain's office and claims to have documents concerning Belzec, Poland, where half a million Jews were murdered in the winter of 1942. Cain isn't surprised when she doesn't return with them as promised . . . until he reads that a woman wearing her distinctive red brooch has been murdered. His investigation leads to a singer named Roberto Delatrucha, who's soon to receive a prestigious national arts medal-an honor sponsored by Conroy, to whose campaign Delatrucha contributed. Cain, an Orthodox Jew and a man of straightforward, predictable habits, finds himself in sudden danger: Cryptic warnings appear; friends die mysteriously; and he's attacked by right-wing militiamen whose links to the case he can't fathom. Elsner possesses a command of Holocaust history, and the plot twists accelerate nicely. He plays, too, with the ways that religious obligation might hamper a protagonist-it's hard to imagine Rambo, for instance, sequestering himself in mid-crisis because it's Shabbat and he can't drive or turn on a light. An intriguing protagonist, terrifying historical lessons and a well-orchestrated, pulse-pounding conclusion redeem Elsner's first effort, which is marred slightly by its workaday prose, and more than slightly by an embarrassing romantic subplot. Agent: Fred Hill/Frederick Hill Bonnie Nadell, Inc. (SFoffice)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781611450569
Publisher:
Arcade Publishing
Publication date:
08/01/2011
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
1,199,105
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Alan Elsner was a Reuters correspondent for more than twenty-five years, first in the Middle East, then as bureau chief for Scandinavia, later as State Department correspondent, and from 1994–2000 as chief political correspondent, traveling with President Clinton and covering the 1996 and 2000 presidential elections. He lives outside of Washington, D.C.

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Nazi Hunter 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I ended up skimming it. Lame personal interactions and too much religion that did nothing for the story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
WWII junkies, this one's for you. The year is 1994, and there's a suspected Nazi war criminal living in the USA. The central character, an Orthodox Jewish bachelor lawyer working for a federal agency, is intriguing for his innocent, tender personality; the plot is unique for its serpentine movement and unexpected interjections; and the research behind the story development is amazing for its depth and accuracy. You don't have to be Jewish to get caught up in the drama; readers who called it boring in their reviews probably had no interest in the subject to begin with. The point of the book is justice and integrity; and at a time when public sentiment and political correctness demand criticism of Israel, this book offers a sound reason for the necessity for a Jewish homeland. Without being maudlin, Alan Elsner uses the Holocaust as a remote background for a murder mystery and an action piece which I found gripping and so engrossing I almost couldn't put it down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
How many mysterious eyes are there? *she sighs* l need to find another twoleg.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Snarls running after
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Okay...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Helping bust out innocents! *uses telepathy*
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am planning a vires to distroy the nook system bewate!