Nazis on the Run: How Hitler's Henchmen Fled Justice [NOOK Book]

Overview


This is the fascinating story of how Nazi war criminals escaped from justice at the end of the Second World War by fleeing through the Tyrolean Alps to Italian seaports, and the role played by the Red Cross, the Vatican, and the Secret Services of the major powers in smuggling them away from prosecution in Europe to a new life in South America.

The Nazi sympathies held by groups and individuals within these organizations evolved into a ...
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Nazis on the Run: How Hitler's Henchmen Fled Justice

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Overview


This is the fascinating story of how Nazi war criminals escaped from justice at the end of the Second World War by fleeing through the Tyrolean Alps to Italian seaports, and the role played by the Red Cross, the Vatican, and the Secret Services of the major powers in smuggling them away from prosecution in Europe to a new life in South America.

The Nazi sympathies held by groups and individuals within these organizations evolved into a successful assistance network for fugitive criminals, providing them not only with secret escape routes but hiding places for their loot. Gerald Steinacher skillfully traces the complex escape stories of some of the most prominent Nazi war criminals, including Adolf Eichmann, showing how they mingled and blended with thousands of technically stateless or displaced persons, all flooding across the Alps
to Italy and from there, to destinations abroad.

The story of their escape shows clearly just how difficult the apprehending of war criminals can be. As Steinacher shows, all the major countries in the post-war world had 'mixed motives' for their actions, ranging from the shortage of trained intelligence personnel in the immediate aftermath of the war to the emerging East-West confrontation after 1947, which led to many former Nazis being recruited as agents turned in the Cold War.

Winner of the 2011 National Jewish Book Award for Holocaust Studies

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
After the defeat of the Third Reich, hundreds of Nazi war criminals—most famously Adolf Eichmann and Josef Mengele—escaped capture, in many cases by going to Latin America. Based on extensive research on newly opened archives, historian Steinacher documents four surprising institutions that aided them in this process: the International Committee of the Red Cross, which freely issued travel documents based on the testimony of two witnesses identifying the Nazi escapees; the Catholic Church, particularly the Vatican Relief Committee and individual priests more interested in fighting communism and gaining new adherents; the U.S., who employed former SS men as anticommunist agents; and finally, Argentina, led by dictator Juan Perón, which admitted ex-Nazis, particularly those with military ties, in an effort to quickly modernize the country. Perón even declared an amnesty for those who had entered the country illegally. Steinacher, a research fellow at Harvard and lecturer on contemporary history at the University of Innsbruck (Austria), generally tells this story clearly and the depth of his research is impressive. Too many individual stories are related too briefly, though, and he gives too much bureaucratic detail. But this is still a fine contribution to the post-history of Nazism, particularly as it was influenced by the early cold war. 16 pages of b&w photos. (June)
From the Publisher

"A well-written book that is packed with startling information and grubby stories about the moral cost of political exigency."
--New Statesman

"The standard for generations of historians who wish to study the fate of Hitler's followers who evaded justice for decades or escaped it altogether."
--Library Journal

Library Journal
Steinacher (Joseph A. Schumpeter Research Fellow, Ctr. for European Studies, Harvard) has meticulously researched how so many Nazi war criminals were able to escape justice after World War II. While its title may lead some readers to expect a dashing adventure tale of espionage and escape, this book is really about the bureaucratic chaos that paralyzed the Allied governments in the early postwar period. By pouring over newly released archives, Steinacher shows how the International Red Cross, the Vatican, and Western intelligence agencies preoccupied with the Cold War against the Soviet Union were all complicit in the escape of key Nazi criminals. Often this assistance was given unintentionally, but the chaos that followed World War II made the escapes almost inevitable. The millions of displaced without documentation made it easy for thousands of war criminals to disappear. VERDICT This book will be the standard for generations of historians who wish to study the fate of Hitler's followers who evaded justice for decades or escaped it altogether. Recommended.—Michael Farrell, Reformed Theological Seminary Lib., Oviedo, FL
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780191653773
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford
  • Publication date: 6/2/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 293,112
  • File size: 19 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Gerald Steinacher is currently a Joseph A. Schumpeter Research Fellow at the Center for European Studies at Harvard University and Lecturer on Contemporary History at the University of Innsbruck, Austria.

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Table of Contents

1. Contents to come with full translation
1. contents to come with full translation

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2012

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2012

    Bad

    As in the nazis are bad pple i liked the nook though.

    1 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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