Neanderthal

( 10 )

Overview

Not since Jurassic Park has a novel so enthralled readers everywhere. Now, enter the world of Neanderthal...

The expedition of the century...uncovers the find of the millennium...Neanderthal.

In the remote mountains of central Asia, an eminent Harvard archeologist discovers something extraordinary. He sends a cryptic message to two colleagues. But then, he disappears.

Matt Mattison and Susan Arnot— once ...

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Overview

Not since Jurassic Park has a novel so enthralled readers everywhere. Now, enter the world of Neanderthal...

The expedition of the century...uncovers the find of the millennium...Neanderthal.

In the remote mountains of central Asia, an eminent Harvard archeologist discovers something extraordinary. He sends a cryptic message to two colleagues. But then, he disappears.

Matt Mattison and Susan Arnot— once lovers, now academic rivals— are going where few humans have ever walked, looking for a relic band of creatures that have existed for over 40,000 years, that possess powers man can only imagine, and that are about to change the face of civilization forever.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Think Indiana Jones! A rollicking tale, hair-raisingly believable. Perfect vacation reading."— Newsday

"Imaginative, entertaining, intelligent...such fun reading."— San Francisco Chronicle

"Clever...Non-stop action!"— Los Angeles Daily News

Library Journal
Darnton's best-selling adventure about scientists who discover a lost race of Neanderthals in Afghanistan is an obvious choice for libraries, so let us only observe that Jay O. Saunders does a good job of narration and move on to other thoughts. The back of the box reads, "Far away, in the mountains of Northern Asia, a guerrilla fighter vanishes, a schoolgirl is murdered, and an eminent Harvard paleontologist disappears." The listener hears about only the last of these three items, but it doesn't matter. Modern escape fiction, too jerky and dialog-heavy for unabridged recordings, lends itself to abridgment perfectly well without losing much stylistic integrity. Yes, one notices characters whizzing by without much development, but one suspects that there isn't all that much more in the full novel. Finally, although it would seem impossible to review this book without mentioning a certain other best-selling writer, we should do Darnton the favor of realizing that he falls squarely into the "lost race" tradition of H. Rider Haggard, Arthur Conan Doyle, and others from the turn of the century (though without the racism). A safe choice for all popular collections.Michael Barrett, San Antonio P.L., Tex.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312963002
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 5/28/1997
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 627,537
  • Product dimensions: 4.26 (w) x 6.70 (h) x 1.09 (d)

Meet the Author

John Darnton was born in New York City in 1941. He has worked for thirty years as a reporter, editor, and foreign correspondent for The New York Times, based in New York, Nigeria, Kenya, Spain, Poland, and the United Kingdom. He won the George Polk Award for his coverage of Africa and Eastern Europe, and in 1982 was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for stories smuggled out of Poland during martial law. He is married to Nina Darnton, also a journalist. They have two daughters, Kyra and Liza, and a son, Jaime. They live in New York City, where Darnton is the Culture Editor for The New York Times.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

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(2)

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Sort by: Showing all of 10 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2004

    Neanderthal level reading material

    Without a doubt, this is one of the schlockiest storylines to make it to print and mass distribution in quite some time. An intriguing beginning soon devolves into a ridiculous pageant of telepathic cavemen hamming it up with some of the most vacuous characters you¿re likely to run across outside the Harlequin romance category. Without giving too much away, I will concede that the irredeemably preposterous (and unintentionally laugh-out-loud hilarious) climax could be worth it for its incomparable cheesiness alone. Overall, though, the book is simply asinine. Make your kids read it as punishment next time they act like little Neanderthals.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    Many of the negative reviews for this novel discount it's primar

    Many of the negative reviews for this novel discount it's primary objective: to take it's readers on a science-fiction adventure. They spoil the story's surprises, some of these reviews, and gasp at the notions presented here in relation to psycho-telepathy and other wonders of which we could not disprove, even if they seem unlikely. I'd love to read their version of a modern adventure about the Neanderthal, and see if I'm half entertained by their interpretation based on current, unimaginative fact alone.
    Somewhere along the line they failed to remember they were reading fiction. Along that trajectory, I wonder if Moby Dick draws regular criticism about its realism and scientific fact. Now, I don't mean to compare this work with the literary genius of Melville's classic, but my point lies in the allowance for fiction to take it's liberties in telling a story that flexes known facts, and dares to suggest other possibilities. For what it was meant for, this novel does it's job.
    If I were to have read this story without knowing who the author was, I would have pegged Michael Crichton. There is science here, but only in the service of establishing a perfect "what-if" scenario. There are indeed a handful of modern scientists and investigators who believe in the premise this novel suggests, but I doubt Mr. Darnton adamantly subscribes to their theories. What he does seem to subscribe to is fun, tense, and (if not particularly original in form) unique story-line parameters that make this a joy to read.
    I mentioned the negative reviewers, and I respect their point of view. But, if you are like me, and have been looking for an entertaining adventure story with just enough technicality and scientific basis to immerse yourself in it's world...Neanderthal provides.
    And always remember history when doubting others' ideas, even the fictional ones. At one point mankind thought it was ridiculous to imagine evolution, or flying in machines, or a world that was not the center of the universe. We doubt even our own capacities for mental transcendence. Darnton is simply saying, "What if...?" Me...I prefer to have fun with those beliefs and feel that power of possibilities; we don't have to swear by them, but why not allow for their potential? Those negative reviewers must have a hard time enjoying anything interesting, unless of course someone's already spelled it out for them.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 5, 2006

    Mind candy

    Matt Mattison and Susan Arnot drive each other crazy. Years ago, when both were graduate assistants to Harvard archaeologist Jerry Kellicut, they lived together as lovers and then parted company when they couldn't stop competing. Or was that all that drove them away from each other? In the busy years of hard, career-building work since then, each has thought about it. Now they're being thrown back together by the professional opportunity of a lifetime. They will have to not only get along, but depend on each other and trust each other. On that their survival will depend. Can they do it? And are both smart enough, on a level that has nothing to do with intellectual brilliance, to realize that's the case? That's the human conflict at the heart of this speculative fiction outing. The book's premise, Neanderthals surviving into the present thanks to isolation, has its moments as author Darnton spins an entertaining yarn. All in all, though, this is familiar stuff and the ending is utterly predictable. Mind candy for spec-fic lovers. Pretty good mind candy, but female readers may sometimes be amused or embarrassed when the author tries with touching awkwardness (marked by complete failure) to get inside Dr. Susan Arnot's head. 3 stars for this one, I think. Worth reading, but impossible to take seriously.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2001

    Fun Exciting Book

    This book was full of action. It was hard to put this book down. It was a great way to start of my summer. The copy I read stated this was going to become a movie directed by Steven Spielberg and come out through Dreamworks. What happened?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2000

    Good ole yarn

    Don't read this book if your looking for the meaning of life .This book is nothing more than a story and a very interesting one at that. It's good in that it gives some knowledge of the theories surrounding Neanderthals -it's especially blatant through the conversations between the scientists. It's so contrived that it makes you wonder if the two main love-interest characters think about anything other than sex and anthropology. But this book doesn't sell itself as something that towers above in the intellectual sphere. It is a great boook for a film. It's true what the cover says,'It will do for Neandertthals what Jurassic Park did for dinosaurs'. I eagerly await Mr. Spielberg's or Mr. Lucas's attempt to turn this into what they do best.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 1999

    Great book that I couldn't put down

    This was a great edge of your seat book. I couldn't put it down! It's a long book but it's worth it. I highly reccomend.

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    Posted July 3, 2013

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    Posted February 25, 2010

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    Posted February 23, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 29, 2009

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