The Nearest Exit [NOOK Book]

Overview

'The first rule of Tourism is not to let it ruin you. Because it can. Easily.'

The Department of Tourism is an ultra-secret black-ops branch rumoured to carry out the CIA's dirtiest and deadliest work. Most agents don't even believe it exists.

Milo Weaver knows otherwise. Trained to kill cleanly and keep moving, he is a Tourist that understands the rules. Don't ask questions. Don't form attachments. Don't look...

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The Nearest Exit

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Overview

'The first rule of Tourism is not to let it ruin you. Because it can. Easily.'

The Department of Tourism is an ultra-secret black-ops branch rumoured to carry out the CIA's dirtiest and deadliest work. Most agents don't even believe it exists.

Milo Weaver knows otherwise. Trained to kill cleanly and keep moving, he is a Tourist that understands the rules. Don't ask questions. Don't form attachments. Don't look back.

But Milo is the only Tourist with a daughter. When he is told to assassinate a teenage girl, his commitment to the cause starts to crumble - and for the first time, he disobeys his orders.

The consequences pull him down into a complex world of clandestine government warfare, but Milo's own battle is with his conscience. When a security breach threatens the very existence of Tourism, will he choose to save his job, his family, or himself?

Winner of the 2010 Hammett Prize

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

To get back in the good graces of the CIA dark-side Department of Tourism, double agent Milo Weaver receives an odious assignment: kidnapping and killing the 15-year-old daughter of Moldovan refugees in Berlin. Repulsed by the mission and yearning desperately for his own family, Weaver is caught on the prongs of a moral dilemma that has no easy or safe solution. This standalone sequel to Olen Steinhauer's The Tourist reveals even a few more well-turned twists than that breakthrough novel. Tightly calibrated action; a protagonist you won't forget; serious entertainment.

Joshua Hammer
…reprises the themes of The Tourist, with even more success…Like le Carré's George Smiley, Weaver is a richly imagined creation with a scarred psyche and a complex back story that elevates him above the status of run-of-the-mill world-weary spook.
—The New York Times
Library Journal
This sequel to Steinhauer's memorable The Tourist presents an espionage tale as puzzling as any a spy fiction might require. An abundance of characters peppers emotionally troubled ex-superspy Milo Weaver's return to the field to perform a horrifying job he does not want to do for people he distrusts. The reader is suspended over a chasm of ambiguity as to who in which agency has been assigned by whom to do what to whom. As with all excellent spy stories, this one reveals betrayal by professional liars at every level. Tourists, hypersecret operatives of the CIA, appear to be the target of a mole, or perhaps there is no mole, only a loose lip somewhere high among American politicos. Working in Europe and the United States, anguished Milo unravels a skein of knotted plots, amoral officials, and subplots disguising an ingenious, unexpected, and terrible revenge.VERDICT While not quite as focused as The Tourist—at times too many important characters and multiple plots threaten to overwhelm the reader—this is still an extraordinarily complex and compelling thriller. [Library marketing.]—Jonathan Pearce, California State Univ.-Stanislaus, Stockton, CA
Publishers Weekly
Milo Weaver, a former field agent with the CIA's clandestine Department of Tourism, returns to action after a stint in prison for alleged financial fraud in this intense sequel to The Tourist. His handlers want Weaver to pursue a mole rumored to have infiltrated the CIA's black-ops department, but with his loyalty in question, he must first undergo some test missions, one of which is to kill the 15-year-old daughter of Moldovan immigrants now living in Berlin. Such a horrific assignment further weakens Weaver's already wavering enthusiasm for his secret life, and he becomes increasingly preoccupied with reconnecting with his estranged wife and child. When bombshell revelations rock Weaver's world, he vows to somehow put international intelligence work behind him. Can he do so without jeopardizing his and his family's safety? Steinhauer's adept characterization of a morally conflicted spy makes this an emotionally powerful read. Author tour. (May)
From the Publisher
Praise for The Tourist

“Here’s the best spy novel I’ve ever read that wasn’t written by John le Carré… It’s a complex story of betrayal anchored by a protagonist who’s as winning as he is wily.”

—Stephen King, Entertainment Weekly

“Smart… He excels when the focus is on Weaver, an intriguing, damaged man yearning to break free of his dark profession.”

People

“Remember John le Carré… when he wrote about beaten-down, morally directionless spies? In other words, when he was good? That's how Olen Steinhauer writes in this tale of a world-weary spook who can't escape the old game.”

Time

“Elaborately engineered… As for Mr. Steinhauer, the two-time Edgar Award nominee who can be legitimately mentioned alongside of John le Carré, he displays a high degree of what Mr. le Carré’s characters like to call tradecraft. If he’s as smart as The Tourist makes him sound, he’ll bring back Milo Weaver for a curtain call.”

The New York Times

“Tour de force… First-rate popular fiction… The Tourist is serious entertainment.”

Washington Post

The Tourist should be savored now. As rich and intriguing as the best of le Carré, Deighton or Graham Greene, Steinhauer's complex, moving spy novel is perfect for our uncertain, emotionally fraught times.”

Los Angeles Times

“As in the best of le Carré's work, the clandestine world of The Tourist is as much about bureaucrats as it is about black bag ops. Steinhauer has a solid grasp of the espionage world (either that or a fertile imagination) that enlivens his enjoyable story.”

Chicago Sun-Times

Kirkus Reviews
Proving there's still juice in the le Carre formula, still another spy comes in from the cold. There's a sort of Tourist who, when he or she visits a church or museum, wants to blow it up. In the clandestine community, Tourists-note the capitalization-are spoken of with the reverence reserved for the best and brightest-and the most lethal. The Department of Tourism, established by the CIA, is so hush-hush that within the Company itself there are those who doubt its existence. Who can blame them? Who ever sees a Tourist? In the entire world, there are only 63 of this special breed, who murder in the service of their government. Essentially decent, though deeply committed, Milo Weaver was one of them. Was, then wasn't, and then suddenly, inexplicably, he's back. So there's Milo, a Milo now with wife and daughter, presumably again ready to kill on command. Soon enough, he discovers that disconcerting changes have taken place: That old gang of his is no longer at command center. But blow away a 15-year-old girl? How does one go about preparing for an assignment that far beyond the pale? Long ago, Milo trained himself to accept on faith that certain acts of wickedness were in fact patriotic acts when ordered by people who loved their country as wholeheartedly as he did. Now, however, a new pragmatism may be undermining the Tourist trade. And maybe murder will turn out to be just murder. Excessively complicated, but it's a Steinhauer (The Tourist, 2009, etc.), which means it's good all the same. Author tour to New York, Washington, D.C., Boston, Minneapolis, San Francisco, Seattle
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781429927239
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press
  • Publication date: 5/11/2010
  • Series: Milo Weaver , #2
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 416
  • Sales rank: 35,668
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Olen Steinhauer

Olen Steinhauer is the author of the bestselling Milo Weaver series, including The Tourist, and a series of widely acclaimed Eastern European crime novels, which include The Bridge of Sighs, The Confession, 36 Yalta Boulevard, Liberation Movements, and Victory Square. He is a two-time Edgar Award finalist and has been shortlisted for the Anthony, the Macavity, the Ellis Peters Historical Dagger, and the Barry awards. Raised in Virginia, Steinhauer lives with his family in Budapest, Hungary.
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Read an Excerpt



THE NEAREST EXIT (CHAPTER 1)

He felt that if he could put a name to it, he could control it. Transgressive association? That had the right sound, but it was too clinical to give him a handle on it. Perhaps the medical label didn't matter anyway. The only thing that mattered was the effect it had on him, and on his job.

The simplest things could trigger it--a bar of music, a face, some small Swiss dog crapping on the sidewalk, or the smell of automobile exhaust. Never children, though, which was strange even to him. Only the indirect fragments of his earlier life gave him that punch in the gut, and when he found himself in a freezing Zürich phone booth calling Brooklyn, he wasn't even sure what had triggered it. All he knew was that he had lucked out: No one answered. An early breakfast somewhere, perhaps. Then the machine picked up. Their two voices: a minor cacophony of female tones, laughing, asking him to please leave a message.

He hung up.

No matter the name, it was a dangerous impulse. On its own, it was nothing. An impulsive--maybe compulsive--call to a home that's no longer home, on a gray Sunday afternoon, is fine. When he peered through the booth's scratched glass at the idling white van on Bellerivestrasse, however, the danger became apparent. Three men waited inside that van, wondering why he'd asked them to stop here, when they were on their way to rob an art museum.

Some might not even think to ask the question, because when life moves so quickly looking back turns into a baffling roll call of moral decisions. Other answers, and you'd be somewhere else. In Brooklyn, perhaps, dealing with Sunday papers and advertising supplements, distractedly listening to your wife's summary of the arts pages and your daughter's critique of the morning's television programming. Yet the question returned as it had so many other times over the last three months: How did I end up here?

The first rule of Tourism is to not let it ruin you, because it can. Easily. The rootless existence, keeping simultaneous jobs straight in your head, showing no empathy when the job requires none, and especially that unstoppable forward movement.

Yet that bastard quality of Tourism, the movement, is also a virtue. It leaves no time for questions that do not directly relate to your survival. This moment was no exception. So he pushed his way out, jogged through the stinging cold, and climbed into the passenger seat. Giuseppe, the pimply, skinny Italian behind the wheel, was chewing a piece of Orbit, freshening the air they all breathed, while Radovan and Stefan, both big men, squatted in the empty rear on a makeshift wooden bench, staring at him.

With these men, the lingua franca was German, so he said, "Gehen."

Giuseppe drove on.

Each Tourist develops his own personal techniques to keep from drowning--verse recitation, breathing exercises, self-injury, mathematical problems, music. This Tourist had once carried an iPod religiously, but he'd given it to his wife as a reconciliation gift, and now he was left with only his musical memories. As they rolled past the bare, craggy winter trees and homes of Seefeld, the southern neighborhood stretching alongside Lake Zürich, he hummed a half-forgotten tune from his eighties childhood, wondering how other Tourists dealt with the anxiety of separation from their families. A stupid thought; he was the only Tourist with a family. Then they turned the next corner, and Radovan interrupted his anxiety with a single statement. "My mother has cancer."

Giuseppe continued driving in his safe way, and Stefan used a rag to wipe excess oil off of the Beretta he'd picked up in a Hamburg market last week. In the passenger seat, the man they knew as Mr. Winter--who toured under the name Sebastian Hall but was known to his distant family as Milo Weaver--glanced back at the broad Serb, whose thick, pale arms were crossed over his stomach, gloved fists kneading his ribs. "I'm sorry to hear that. We all are."

"I'm not trying to jinx anything," Radovan went on, his German muddied by a thick Belgrade accent. "I just had to say something before we did this. You know. In case I don't have a chance later."

"Sure. We get it."

Dutifully, Giuseppe and Stefan muttered their agreement.

"Is it treatable?" Milo Weaver asked.

Radovan looked confused, crammed in between Stefan and a pile of deflated burlap bags. "It's in the stomach. Spread too far. I'm going to have her checked out in Vienna, but the doctor seems to know what he's talking about."

"You never know," Giuseppe said as he turned onto another tree-lined street.

"Sure," Stefan agreed, then went back to his gun, lest he say something wrong.

"You're going to be with us on this?" Milo asked, because it was his responsibility to ask such things.

"Anger helps me focus."

Milo went through the details with them again. It was a simple enough plan, one that depended less on its mechanics than on the element of surprise. Each man knew his role, but Radovan--might he take out his personal troubles on some poor museum guard? He was, after all, the one with a gun. "Remember, there's no need for casualties."

They all knew this, if only because he had repeated it continually over the last week. It had quickly become a joke, that Mr. Winter was their Tante Winter, their old aunt keeping them out of trouble. The truth was that he had been through nearly three months of jobs they knew nothing about, none of which had claimed bystanders. He didn't want these recruits ruining his streak.

This was job number eight. It was still early enough in his return to Tourism that he could keep track, but late enough for him to wonder, and worry, about why all the jobs had been so damned easy.

Number four, December 2007. The whiny voice of Owen Mendel, acting director of Tourism, spoke through his Nokia: Please, go to Istanbul and withdraw fifteen thousand euros from the Interbank under the name Charles Little. You'll find the passport and account number at the hotel. Fly to London, and in the Chase Manhattan at 125 London Wall open an account with that money. Same name. Make sure customs doesn't find the cash. Think you can handle it?

You don't ask why because that's not a Tourist's prerogative. Simply believe that it's all for the best, that the whiny voice on the line is the Voice of God.

Job two, November 2007: There's a woman in Stockholm. Sigfreid Larsson. Two esses. She's at the Grand Hôtel on Blasieholmshammen. She's expecting you. Buy her and yourself a ticket to Moscow and make sure she gets to 12 Trubnaya ulica by the eighteenth. Got that?

Larsson, a sixty-year-old professor of international relations, was shocked but flattered by all the fuss made over her.

Jobs for children; jobs for third-rank embassy staff.

Number five, January 2008: Now this one is sensitive. Name's Lorenzo Peroni, high-scale arms dealer based in Rome. I'll text you the details. He's meeting with a South Korean buyer named Pak Jin Myung in Montenegro. I want you on top of him from when he leaves his apartment on the eighth until he returns on the fifteenth. No, don't worry about mikes, we've taken care of that. Just keep up the visual, hone your camera work.

As it turned out, Pak Jin Myung was no arms buyer but one of Peroni's many mistresses. The resulting photographs were more appropriate for English tabloids.

So it went. One more impotent surveillance in Vienna, the order to mail a sealed manila envelope from Berlin to a Theodor Wartmüller in Munich, a one-day Paris surveillance, and a single murder, at the beginning of the month. That order had been sent by text message:

L: George Whitehead. Consider dangerous. In Marseille for week starting Thurs.

George Whitehead, patriarch of a London crime family, looked about seventy, though he was in fact closer to eighty. No bullets were required, just a single push in the hotel steam room. His head cracked against the damp wall planks; the concussion knocked him out for life.

It hardly even felt like murder.

Others might have been pleased by the ease and inconsequence of these assignments. However, Milo Weaver--or Sebastian Hall or Mr. Winter--could not relax, because the ease and inconsequence meant only one thing: They were onto him. They knew, or they suspected, that his loyalties did not lie entirely with them.

Now this, another test. Get some money together. Ideally, twenty million, but if you can only get five or ten we'll understand.

Dollars?

Yes, dollars. You have a problem with that?

THE NEAREST EXIT. Copyright © 2010 by Third State, Inc.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 59 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 59 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    a terrific complicated and purposely convoluted espionage thriller

    Former master spy Milo Weaver is assigned to return to field work. He loathes the task as he is ordered to do something horrific for people who will throw him under the bus if there is a hint of scandal.

    Apparently a mole is inside the agency. He or she must be purged before those in the cold are eliminated. Milo is to find the traitor and kill the traitor. The problem is no evidence surfaces inside the agency; only politicians taking credit and tossing blame. That is until he begins to unravel a double helix case of revenge, but by who remains unknown and the field threat imminent.

    The return of The Tourist is a terrific complicated and purposely convoluted espionage thriller as even the identities of the agencies are murky. Weaver knows exactly the key traits of his superiors whom he detests and distrusts. These political desk jockey handler(s) make Lady Macbeth seem as if she lacks ambition as they will do anything including allowing field operatives to die to further their careers. Filled with a zillion suspects and multiple subplots, Weaver knows The Nearest Exit for a field agent is death.

    Harriet Klausner

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 12, 2011

    Not as good as the first one

    This book definitely picks up where the first one left off, but it does a lot of recapping so that someone could read this as a stand alone instead of a 2nd book in a series. I found it to be very repetitive and moved a lot slower than the first one in the series. I still finished it, and I did enjoy it, and I would even read the next one. But I think the reiteration of so much plot was a waste of space and probably unnecessary.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Enjoyable

    Read "The Tourist" first it too is a good book and it makes "The Nearest Exit" a good sequel. These two books are good for those who love espionage novels.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 19, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    He Didn't Take The Right Exit

    If this novel were 300 pages long, I would have said that it was exciting and full of intrigue, even if a bit convoluted and at times confusing. It surely deserved 4 stars for entertainment value.
    But, the book, inexplicably, went on for another 100 pages, where the author found more tedium as he felt the need to explain more than necessary. Perhaps he just liked his story so much that he couldn't quit. But, the last 100 pages wore me out, they didn't excite me, and I found myself looking for the nearest exit!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 9, 2012

    Loved it


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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2012

    SpyGal on May 6, 2012

    LOVED The Tourist, so was very excited about this one. A bit more complex and more foul language...the language, for such a compelling writer, was quite disappointing. Plot and storyline were great though! Was always anxious to read more each day!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 20, 2012

    Recommended

    Good follow-up to "The Tourist".

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  • Posted May 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great Spy Stuff

    Mr. Steinhauer can really weave a plot. The Tourist and this book are the only two of his books I've read and I can't wait to get my hands on the third book in the Milo Weaver Trilogy - whenever that may be. These books remind me of Bill Granger's "November Man" books - great characters, deep insight in to the darkest aspects of modern day espionage, and very believable. If you love SpyFi, you need these books on your shelf.

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  • Posted March 4, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Great Addition to the Series

    Book 2 in the Milo Weaver series

    The series focuses on the world of espionage and clandestine operations in the post 9-11 era. Although the author has provided some helpful background to jog ones memory and keep the pace moving smoothly reading the prequel "The Tourist" is a must to fully grasp the cleverness behind the plotting. You will soon discover that the novels are more than simple espionage thrillers; they also combine mystery, romance and horror without sacrificing action or suspense.

    The story begins where "The Tourist" ended. Milo Weaver is fighting to get back into action and regain his good stature with his employer, being a full-fledged "Tourist" (undercover agent) is his only mission in life. Everything goes well in proving his loyalty until he is assigned an unbelievable request: kidnap and murder a 15 year old girl. He kidnaps the girl but hesitates at murder thus leaving him in a dangerous position. Caught between his conscience and the orders of his powerful boss, Milo finds himself haunted by his profession, a world where truth and trust are but a blur. He is plunged into a maze of lies that takes him on an action packed roller-coaster ride till the end....He needs help....

    The complex central plot is embedded in a twisted mesh of sub-plots, a Pandora's Box of deceit and manipulation brilliantly conceived. "Tourists" are programmed to follow orders without question but Milo needs to know the deep routed reason behind his boss's request. He turns to his father, another powerful man for help and together they arrange a solution, a deception that is beyond belief.....The mystery deepens when Milo senses he is being shadowed....all this makes for an exciting adventure full of intrigue and international espionage....

    The brisk pacing and sharp dialogue enhance the plotting and paint a vivid picture of the underworld of espionage. The numerous characters are well represented, very motivated and task driven but run of the mill stereotyping sneaks in at times. The story becomes a tad challenging as it follows the different points of view of its characters back and forth in time, but is well worth the effort.

    This sequel is a great addition to Milo's escapades

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  • Posted June 8, 2010

    Nearest Exit

    a great sequel to The Tourist with if anything more twists and turns than that terrific story. I suggest reading TT first though it's not critical I guess. Read and enjoy.

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