Nearly Everything Imaginable: The Everyday Life of Utah's Mormon Pioneers

Nearly Everything Imaginable: The Everyday Life of Utah's Mormon Pioneers

by Ronald W. Walker
     
 

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From living in a dugout called the Castle of Spiders to eating so many weeds their skin took on a green cast to losing four children in just a few weeks to diphtheria, nearly everything imaginable happened to the Mormon settlers of Utah Territory. Here are the details of the lives of the common people—what they ate, wore, lived in, and celebrated, how they

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Overview

From living in a dugout called the Castle of Spiders to eating so many weeds their skin took on a green cast to losing four children in just a few weeks to diphtheria, nearly everything imaginable happened to the Mormon settlers of Utah Territory. Here are the details of the lives of the common people—what they ate, wore, lived in, and celebrated, how they worshipped, and why they endured.

In Nearly Everything Imaginable, you'll find hundreds of vignettes from Utah's early settlers, including: "Old and young would gather for dancing; everybody came early and left about the midnight hour. The bedrooms opening from the hall were generally filled with babies snugly tucked away, while the mothers enjoyed the dance. The huge fireplaces at either end of the hall were piled high with dry cedar fagots, the flames from which leaped and danced up the chimneys. Candles held in place by three nails driven into wooden brackets were ranged high along the walls. Tickets were paid for in any kind of produce that the fiddlers could be induced to accept. Usually a couple of two-bushel sacks could be seen near the door, into which the dancers deposited their contributions."

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Historians draw from a wide range of sources to reconstruct the rhythm and cycles of life in the 19th-century settlements. Among the topics are social character in rural settlements, dancing the buckles off their shoes, the , native children in Mormon households, and three specific families. A section of color photographs shows period clothing on new models. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknew.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781938896989
Publisher:
Deseret Book Company
Publication date:
10/13/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
7 MB

Meet the Author

Ronald W. Walker is the author of Wayward Saints: The Godbeites and Brigham Young and Mountain Meadows Massacre: The Andrew Jenson and David H. Morris Collections.
Doris R. Dant is a former executive editor of BYU Studies, an academic LDS journal.

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