Nebula Awards Showcase 2012

Nebula Awards Showcase 2012

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by Joseph Kessel
     
 

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The Year's Best Science Fiction and Fantasy Selected by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America®.

The Nebula Awards Showcase volumes have been published annually since 1966, reprinting the winning and nominated stories in the Nebula Awards, voted on by the members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. The editors

Overview

The Year's Best Science Fiction and Fantasy Selected by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America®.

The Nebula Awards Showcase volumes have been published annually since 1966, reprinting the winning and nominated stories in the Nebula Awards, voted on by the members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. The editors selected by SFWA's anthology committee (chaired by Mike Resnick) are John Kessel and James Patrick Kelly, both highly acclaimed not only for their own award-winning fiction but also as coeditors of three anthologies: Feeling Very Strange: The Slipstream Anthology, Rewired: The Post-Cyberpunk Anthology, and The Secret History of Science Fiction.

Stories and excerpts by Harlan Ellison™, Kij Johnson, Chris Barzak, Eric James Stone, Rachel Swirsky, Geoff Landis, Shweta Narayan, Adam Troy-Castro, James Tiptree Jr., Aliette de Bodard, Amal El-Mohtar, Kendall Evans and Samantha Henderson, Howard Hendrix, Ann K. Schwader, Connie Willis, Terry Pratchett, and more.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
From the cover by Nebula-winning artist Michael Whelan to the very last page, this remarkable anthology is filled with the very best of the SF and fantasy published in 2010. In addition to republishing or excerpting many winners and a few finalists from the 2010 Nebulas, Kelly and Kessel (Kafkaesque) have thoughtfully included selections from a few other speculative fiction awards, such as “In the Astronaut Asylum” by Kendall Evans and Samantha Henderson, which won the Rhysling Award for long-form poetry, and a snippet of Terry Pratchett’s I Shall Wear Midnight, winner of the Andre Norton Award for children’s and young adult SF/F. Readers will savor the writing of such well-known authors as Connie Willis (excerpts from Blackout and All Clear) and Kij Johnson (“Ponies”) as well as relative newcomers like Amal El-Mohtar (“The Green Book”) and Rachel Swirsky (“The Lady Who Plucked Red Flowers Beneath the Queen’s Window”); all the inclusions are outstanding works of fiction. (May)
Kirkus Reviews
The 2010 Nebula Award winners, as voted in 2011 by members of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (after a preliminary sieving), finally served up in 2012. The short-story winners, following a tie: Kij Johnson's "Ponies," a razor-slash across the jugular illustrating the unthinking cruelty of young girls; and Harlan Ellison's "How Interesting: A Tiny Man," something like a modern take on the point J.G. Ballard made long ago with "The Drowned Giant." Novelette winner Eric James Stone's "That Leviathan, Whom Thou Hast Made" features colossal energy-beings that live inside the sun, and--really--Mormonism (I know, I know--but read the story anyway). "The Lady Who Plucked Red Flowers Beneath the Queen's Window," Rachel Swirsky's winning novella (concerning a matriarchal society whose chief wizard is betrayed by her monarch into perpetual enslavement) suffers from its staccato pacing and unfinished air. There are excerpts from Connie Willis' Blackout/All Clear (best novel) and Andre Norton Award winner Terry Pratchett's I Shall Wear Midnight. The Solstice Award (for impact on the field) was claimed by the late James Tiptree Jr. and illustrated with a devastating story of alien sex, "And I Awoke And Found Me Here On The Cold Hill's Side." Other ballot finalists are represented by Geoff Landis, Chris Barzak, Shweta Narayan, Adam Troy-Castro, Aliette de Bodard and Amal el-Mohtar, and there's poetry from Kendall Evans and Samantha Henderson, Howard Hendrix and Ann K. Schwader. Not a banner year, all things considered, with greatest likely appeal to the younger section of the audience (but is it the audience that's getting younger, or the writers, or the voters?), and too often pallid, especially--perhaps unfairly--contrasted with a true heavyweight champion like Tiptree.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781616146207
Publisher:
Prometheus Books
Publication date:
05/11/2012
Sold by:
Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,101,282
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

James Patrick Kelly has written novels, short stories, essays, reviews, poetry, audioplays, theatrical plays and planetarium shows. His short novel Burn won the Nebula Award in 2007; he has also won two Hugo Awards. His fiction has been translated into eighteen languages.

John Kessel teaches creative writing and American Literature at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. He has been nominated nine times for the Nebula Award and has won twice, for the novelette "Pride and Prometheus" and the novella "Another Orphan," and he has also won the Theodore Sturgeon, Locus, James Tiptree Jr., and Shirley Jackson Awards. Kessel co-edited the anthologies Feeling Very Strange and The Secret History of Science Fiction with James Patrick Kelly. His collection The Baum Plan for Financial Independence and Other Stories was published in 2008.


From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Nebula Awards Showcase 12 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Life is different as a lizzard. But different is bad. I didnt know what to do it was so weird being a lizzard. Everyone else was freaking out, but not more than me. Feet were everywhere and I was afraid of being steped on. Then suddenly I was me again. Gone was the orange scales and wings of the lizzard yet the panic stayed. Scared I looked aroujd and found the eyes of the teacher. Then I knew I had to go. My life was already ruined enough it didnt matter what I did. So I dissappeard in fear. I maybe should have just walked out or flew out because I was rapidly falling. Falling straight for where the real magma lizzards live. Freefalling towards the magma at the bottom I almost forgot how to fly. I did but my wings didnt d at the last moment possible I found my self hovering over the magma. Now even more scared then Iwas before I flew, back towards the city, as fast as I could go. I could go back to school and couldnt go anywhere public for sure. So I went the only place I could, home. But even there I wasnt safe. I had only a few minutes to myself. My teacher had found our clan eleder. I watched from a window as he came walking towards me with my parents and teacher in tow. I dont remember much after that but it was all a blur. But next came my trial an I do remember that.