Necessary Losses

( 10 )

Overview

"This perceptive book should absorb and enrich anyone who admits to being human."
Benjamin Spock, M.D.
Essayist Judith Viorst, who has humorously eased our journey to middle age, now turns her considerable talents to a more serious and far-reaching subject: how we grow and change through the losses that are an inevitable and necessary part of life. Arguing persuasively that through the loss of our mothers' protection, the loss of the impossible expectations we bring to ...
See more details below
This Hardcover (Large print ed.]) is Not Available through BN.com
Necessary Losses

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.38
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.

Overview

"This perceptive book should absorb and enrich anyone who admits to being human."
Benjamin Spock, M.D.
Essayist Judith Viorst, who has humorously eased our journey to middle age, now turns her considerable talents to a more serious and far-reaching subject: how we grow and change through the losses that are an inevitable and necessary part of life. Arguing persuasively that through the loss of our mothers' protection, the loss of the impossible expectations we bring to relationships, the loss of our younger selves, and the loss of our loved ones through separation and death, we gain deeper persepctive, true maturity, and fuller wisdom about life, Judith Viorst has wirtten a life-affirming and life-changing book.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Personal experience, great literature liberally quoted here, and study of psychoanalytic theory are combined in this far-ranging, somewhat rambling book by Redbook columnist Viorst to demonstrate that growing and aging involve a succession of conscious and unconscious losses, including the loss of youth. Citing examples, and starting with the loss of the mother-child connection, she indicates that only by learning to relinquish people, places, situations and emotions that concern us at stages of life from childhood to old age can we develop a positive identity and self-image. We must realize, she argues, that these losses are a necessary part of life and growth. A strong sense of self will help us remain positive in the face of the many physical and psychological losses of old age and to accept life's final loss that is death. Losing, Viorst concludes, is the price we pay for living. (April)
Library Journal
Viorst, poet and Redbook contributor, is also a research graduate of the Washington Psychoanalytic Institute, and has worked in psychiatric settings. Her topic is loss because everyone must cope with it throughout life: childhood ends, we recognize that our expectations are unrealistic, friends and family members die, ultimately we die. Viorst offers a competent journalistic treatment of the subject, drawing upon psychoanalytic theory, interviews, and literature, and includes notes and a bibliography. Most of what she says has been said elsewhere, especially in books on mid-life crisis. Popular collections will want to have this because Viorst is known, but readers who expect a profound or truly personal approach to the topic may be disappointed. Margaret Allen, M.L.S., West Lebanon, N.H.
From the Publisher
Benjamin Spock, M.D. This perceptive book should absorb and enrich anyone who admits to being human.

United Press International The kind of book that belongs in every household. It is simply healthy to have around.

Rabbi Harold S. Kushner author of When Bad Things Happen to Good People One of the most sensitive and comprehensive books about the human condition I have read in a long time.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781555042295
  • Publisher: AudioGO
  • Publication date: 1/1/1987
  • Edition description: Large print ed.]
  • Pages: 651

Meet the Author

Judith Viorst was born and brought up in New Jersey, graduated from Rutgers University, moved to Greenwich Village, and has lived in Washington, DC, since 1960, when she married Milton Viorst, a political writer. They have three sons and seven grandchildren. Viorst writes in many different areas: science books, children’s picture books, adult fiction and nonfiction, poetry for children and adults, and musicals, which are still performed on stages around the country. She is best known for her beloved picture book Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 10 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(4)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2003

    Very inspiring!

    This book allows us to understand that letting go of some things is part of a maturation process in life. Though many people commonly feel like letting go is like giving up and being a loser, we also know that the most important lessons in life are learned from our losses. This author sheds some light on the important difference between these two things by providing us with interesting examples from her experiences. I think this book is excellent for people who are at the brink of letting go of something important to them. It gives them an extra bit of inspiration to let go and move on with their lives. For people who are not near this stage, this book may not make much sense simply because they are not yet emotionally ready for the next step. Another book that is excellent in explaining the emotional process of letting go and how that relates to personal development is 'The Ever-Transcending Spirit' by Toru Sato. It explains these seemingly complex things in such a simple way that it is absolutely stunning!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2007

    A reviewer

    This book was not only enjoyable reading but illustrative of the many types of losses experienced by an individual, each one unique in its impact on individual growth through loss. Judith Viorst gives good perspectives on the notion of loss. This book was recommended reading for social work and research class.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 24, 2003

    One of My Top Five Favorite Books

    I would like to disagree with the slightly irresponsible reviews given this book by LIBRARY JOURNAL and PUBLISHER'S WEEKLY. Though their over-all reviews were positive, they implied that Judith Viorsts'work is well written and interesting for the most part but that it's been said before. I may not be as well-read as those reviewers but I read plenty of books of all kinds -- literary and or philosophical novels, philosophy and psychology books written for the layperson of which I am. I have also read a few textbooks of these types. Viorst doesn't write down to her readers. She writes as though we are her dear friends. After I've read anything written by her, whether it's a short essay, poetry, children's book or her other books like Necessary Losses, I come away from the reading feeling heartened, more knowledgeable and as though there is at least someone who has experienced the trials and happinesses that I have. There are answers in her expert weaving of words. I'd say that her book is like an answer-quilt -- one has to read and enjoy it and then when finished, re-read it in again in one's own mind, stand back and view it as you would a quilt. I think many will be astounded if they read any of her work with an open mind, always ready to receive information, knowledge and wisdom. Joy Lackey / p.o. Box 508 / Summersville, WV 26651

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 3, 2011

    23 years ago, when I was engaged to the silly man I'm still married to, this book helped me to understand something about commitment.

    I'm ordering a used paperback of this edition today. I want to read her introduction, and to look where I believe I'll find a positive way to look at moving on to this next chapter of life.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 24, 2012

    I have been reading this book for over 20 years. This is my com

    I have been reading this book for over 20 years. This is my comfort
    book. Making sense of life loss and tragic loss inparticular is
    difficult but I have sought comfort and understanding through this book
    and the lessons learned. Instead of sending flowers, I buy this book
    for people in my life who are experiencing difficult emotional times.
    It is a wonderful life resource that should be shared. I am purchasing
    two more today.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 23, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 12, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)