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Nectar in a Sieve

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This beautiful and eloquent story tells of a simple peasant woman in a primitive village in India whose whole life was a gallant and persistent battle to care for those she loved.

Married as a child bride to a tennant farmer she had never seen, she worked side by side in the field with her husband to wrest a living from land that was ravaged by droughts, monsoons, and insects. With remarkable fortitude and courage, she sought to meet changing times and fight poverty and ...

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New York 1961 Mass-market paperback 2nd printing Very good. No dust jacket as issued. (090806) Mass Market Paperback is in VG+/Fine condition with slight age darkening at spine, ... slight spine slant, extremely light overall wear. Mass market (rack) paperback. Glued binding. Audience: General/trade. Read more Show Less

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1982 Mass-market paperback new american library GoodGOOD + CONDITION-TANNING INSIDE COVER-PAGES WHITE, FLAT, BINDING TIGHT. COVER IS CLEAN WITH CORNER CREASE. SHIPS FROM ... WA-USPS. Mass market (rack) paperback. Glued binding. Audience: General/trade. GOOD + CONDITION-TANNING INSIDE COVER-PAGES WHITE, FLAT, BINDING TIGHT. COVER IS CLEAN WITH CORNER CREASE. SHIPS FROM WA-USPS. Signet Book paperback 451-AE5647. new american library, copyright renewed 1982. Markandaya, Kamala-author. Farm life; Farmers' spouses; Fiction; General; India; Indian; Literary; Literary Collections; Rural Read more Show Less

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Nectar in a Sieve

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Overview

This beautiful and eloquent story tells of a simple peasant woman in a primitive village in India whose whole life was a gallant and persistent battle to care for those she loved.

Married as a child bride to a tennant farmer she had never seen, she worked side by side in the field with her husband to wrest a living from land that was ravaged by droughts, monsoons, and insects. With remarkable fortitude and courage, she sought to meet changing times and fight poverty and disaster. She saw one of her infants die from starvation, her daughter become a prostitute, and her sons leave the land for jobs which she distrusted. And, somehow, she survived...

In a small village in India, a simple peasant woman recalls her life as a child bride, a farmer's wife, and a devoted mother amidst fights to meet changing times, poverty, and disaster.

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Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
Comparable in many ways to Cry, the Beloved Country...if anything...better.
Saturday Evening Post
Comparable in many ways to Cry, the Beloved Country...if anything...better.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780451156471
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 5/1/1956
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 1
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 5.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Kamala Markandaya was the pen name of Kamala Purnaiya Taylor, who was born in Bangalore, India in 1924 and died in England in 2004. Her family was Brahman, the highest caste in Hindu society. Markandaya made an effort to know not just the city in which she lived but also India's rural areas. She was educated at the University of Madras in Chennai, India, and worked briefly for a weekly newspaper before emigrating to England in 1948. There she met her husband, with whom she lived in London. While Markandaya made England her home, she made many visits to India over the years to stay in touch with her culture and to find inspiration and ideas for her fiction.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 63 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(24)

4 Star

(24)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 63 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2009

    AP World History Review: Strength Through Change

    Nectar In a Sieve by Kamala Markandaya is an extremely interesting novel illustrating the struggles an Indian woman faces as she endures the changes white men bring to her small village. The author shows readers how Western industrialization and modernization greatly affected the lives of Indian civilians throughout the twenthieth century. The main character, Rukmani, witnesses her home transform from a connected, reliable, and enjoyable place to one where foreign ideas pollute the society and corrupt the minds and hearts of many. Through her struggles, Rukmani works hard to maintain hope for her family and remains supportive of the decisions made around her. Kamala Markandaya uses Rukmani to effectively portray the hardships imposed on Indians when the Westerners began implementing their own improvements. She preceisly depicts the changing perspectives and ways of life for people of India while white men transformed their society.

    After reading this revealing and heartfelt novel, I was able to see the true impact of Western influence in India. Kamala Markandaya creates many characters that help bring readers into the lives of struggling Indians in the twenthieth century. I recommend this novel to anyone who enjoys reading about one's strength despite adversity. Nectar in a Sieve is an excellent novel that depicts the many struggles and instances of happiness of Indian society.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2009

    AP World History Review: A Touching Story

    Set in a small village in India, Kamala Markandaya's Nectar in a Sieve is a griping novel that tells a story of a woman's struggle to find happiness and her own inner strength in a changing India. Markandaya writes a very real tale of a 12 year old girl, Rukmani, through all her troubles until her last days. The author explains through Rukmani, the toils and tribulations struggling famillies in India faced. Shes goes in depth at some points in the novel, to the point where you have to drag through pages, but other than a few extra details this novel is very well written.

    All in all, this was a wonderful read. The book was very detailed and made you feel like you actually knew Rukmanni. Nectar in a Sieve is such an eye opener to the world around us. I enjoyed reading about the Indian culture, how ever rough and different it may be from ours. I'd recommend this novel to anyone in middle school or older. We can always learn something new about ourselves and other through any literature at any time in our lives.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 10, 2012

    Need To Read

    This is an absolutely beautiful novel that I’ve now read eight times, and I love it more with each reading. Markandaya really has a way with words, painting a vivid picture of what life is like in rural India, how wealth is decided by the season and weather, and how everything can be lost in an instant.

    In this circular novel, Rukmani tells her life story, beginning with a dream, then delving deep into the past, tracing her life from childhood to present, causing the reader to rejoice and cry alongside her as she reveals all in this heartbreaking yet triumphant novel. Having married young and leaving her family behind, Rukmani learns what it means to be the woman of the house, working the soil alongside her husband, praying for sons, and caring for those around her. Coming from wealth, her life is not what she expected, but her easy demeanor and good nature cause her never a grumble, making her a lovable character that the reader easily connects with, though we may never experience all the triumphs or tribulations that Ruku does.

    The fact that the story is so poignant and easy to follow, let alone interesting and intriguing, makes for a fast read, and though Rukmani’s life is so vastly different from my own, I can’t help but look up to her. She experiences vast heartache, but always comes back strong, making her twice the woman I am… The truths Markandaya presents in this novel are absolutely amazing and learning about Ruku’s culture, her way of life, her happiness, and her sadness really presses upon me the importance of living each day to the fullest and focusing on the good in life, as Ruku does. I find that this is a very powerful novel and I strongly believe that all should read it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2007

    By Matthew Gant: Nectar in a sieve

    A beautiful young woman, married to a poor hopeless farmer with no choice of her own. Her parent chose this life for her and now she has to live life hour by hour, day by day and every minute of it she is regretting living. Never knowing when she will be able to eat or when she will be able see her children. She is living a life in hope that she will someday become the woman she has always dreamt about, or she is hoping that she might not have to live at all. Married to a farmer by age 12 she knew that she was not going to like her life. She would have to work on a farm with her husband and hope that she would be able to feed her family, if not herself. This farm is filled with bad memories that she would have to live with for the rest of her life. Not only was this hardship bad enough but her but the farm she and her husband owns has dry unfertile soil that is horrible for growing crops. This farm will also endure a life of hardship. Having to survive (if that is what you would call it) the droughts monsoons, and insects.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 3, 2014

    An achingly beautiful book

    Oh the joy of finding such a book. So very beautiful. Beautifully written. A unforgetable love story an inspirational heroine. Best book in a long time
    So sad. The author died long ago.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 14, 2013

    Dont read!!

    Had to this this book for english and it is the worst book i've ever read. I will never recommend it.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2013

    Had to read for school. Loved it!!

    I jad to read this for school. I got a good grade on the test because the book is very well written and fairly easy to follow. Rukmani and Nathan suffer many hard times. Through a monsoon, drought, loss of family members and their life in thecity, they manage to maintain hope. I highly recommend this book!

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  • Posted November 11, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Nectar in a Sieve is an Indian family story that is culturally

    Nectar in a Sieve is an Indian family story that is culturally and socially sound. It is a beautiful story of a family that went through a lot in their life. I find the Indian culture richly interwoven with the events of the story that involves a family grappling with survival in a setting that is immensely povertous. The struggle of each family member is one that shook heaven and earth in the story. Its beginning is beautiful until the events come one after the other in the story that lead the family to be in complete solidarity. This is a must read for those interested in Indian culture and family relationship.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2009

    AP World History Review: A Heartfelt Story of a Woman's Hardship in Changing Times

    Kamala Markandaya's character Rukmani describes her life from a little girl to an elderly grandmother in Nectar in a Sieve. From her early life, she knew that the conditions that most directly effected her life were changing. She was not given a grand, lavish wedding when she was 12 years old like her sisters were because their father, the village headman, was losing his power to the new British authority. The village she lived in with her husband was quickly over taken by more white men and changed into a thriving town complete with a tannery and new houses for the multitude of workers needed to run it. Only after money and land, these men refused to help during the droughts and flooding caused by monsoon rains that brought starvation into Rukmani's family of her husband, six sons and one daughter. She is a rebel against this change. She does not and will not ever accept it. She sees the violence, corruption, and unfairness brought by these newcomers who speak to the Indians as if they are inferior. The industrialization they bring to her village greatly displeases her. Prices of market items are driven up, land is taken from people to be made into a factory or houses for its workers, and laborers in search of a job crowd into the new town, as well as beggers, harlots, and hooligans. The starvation brought on by the monsoon winds and the state of the village after the white men come leads Rukmani to take extreme steps to care for her family. I think that she has a great sense of ownership and love towards her family that made her strong during her hardships. The duty she felt towards them made her keep fighting for what she believed was right. She did everything in her power to keep providing food for them, to educate them, to nurture them, and to give them a solid foundation for the rest of their lives. Between saving for a grand wedding for Ira, allowing her two sons to chase their dreams of a content life by leaving the village, and going hungry so her family could eat, Rukmani was an advocate for strength and is a character created by Markandaya to inspire others to fight through adversity.
    However, Rukmani's strength comes from and is applied in strange places. She believes that a woman's place is next to a husband. She allows Ira to prostitute herself on the streets, using her beautiful body as a tool to earn money. She submits to the will of Kenny because he is a white man and to Nathan because he is her husband. Her strength is applied to her family, but not to herself. She allows herself to be ordered around and scolded by Nathan and called ignorant and stupid by Kenny without putting up a fight. She is a strong parent and a strong promoter of her beliefs, but not strong as a woman. Also, the reasons behind her fight to feed her family and to have money are often that she cares what her neighbors will think of her. She is afraid of what people in the town will think of her and her family if they can not eat, if her sons do not go back to work at the tannery after they start a rebellion, and if Ira births a child out of prostitution. Not always does she do the things she does out of love and protection of her family, but for the keeping up of their appearance. Because of this, I think Markandaya does a fair job of accomplishing the purpose of inspiring strength in her readers. Rukmani does whatever is necessary to fend for her family, but not always for the right reasons or to the right causes.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2008

    AP World History Review: An Emotional Life Story

    Nectar in a Sieve tells the tale of a village woman that has suffered a lot throughout her life. Kamala Markandaya, the author of Nectar in a Sieve, purpose for writing Nectar in a Sieve is to explain the life of a woman whose village is under the control Britain in the mid 1900s and the devastating life that a woman would have to lead. Rukmani is the main character of the story, and she experienced the death of many of her sons and watched her daughter go into the field of prostitution to support the family. Rumors spread around the village that Rukmani was having an affair with Kenny, the village doctor, and force Rukmani to become angry with one of her neighbors. Markandaya completes her intention for writing the novel by explaining the life difficulties that Rukmani had to experience. Overall, I would recommend this book. It explains how the way of life today is utterly different from how life was back in the mid 1900s. People today need to know realize who different life is today. If they do not start to comprehend the differences, then society will always have corruption within it, and that would not be good for the human race. I would also recommend the novel because it tells of a strong woman that stood up for what she thought was right. Girls today should have a female figure in history that they can look up to as a mentor, whether that woman is fiction or not.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2007

    the bomb

    Nectar in a Sieve by Kamala Markandaya is the saddest book I have ever read. This book could probably put many people into tears. The writer did an excellent job of letting you know what the characters were going through. Nectar in a Sieve is the story of a strong woman trying to just survive in a little town in India. Rukmani, the main character, lives in a small hut on some farmland close to a very small village. Rukmani is married to a man named Nathan and has several children. Rukmani and her family go through many different struggles just to have something to eat. Nectar in a Sieve is very touching and I could imagine being one of the characters. The pain of Rukmani and her family is something that most people never have to deal with in their whole lives. People that I know take their food for granted and sometimes won¿t even eat it all. This wasn¿t even an option in Nectar in a Sieve. You finished what you received and you were usually unsatisfied.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    Not a masterpiece, but worth the time

    When I was given this book to read for a school assignment, I didn¿t know whether to be excited or disappointed. The book looked interesting, but I didn¿t know whether it just looked good, or was very boring with little life in it. While the book is a little dry in places, I enjoyed all the way. The way that Rukmani, the main character, still clings to hope after misfortune after misfortune is just a good read. The story begins in the 1930¿s-1940¿s with a twelve year old Rukmani, an Indian girl whose father is a village chieftain. She gets married off to Nathan, a poor rice farmer in a far away village. After growing up in relative luxury, the sudden change is drastic and shaking. Soon, she adapts and makes friends with the village women, except for Kunthi, a beautiful snob. She also meets Kenny, a European doctor sent to the village to provide relief and medical care when possible. At first, Rukmani cannot conceive a child, but she secretly visits Kenny, who improves her fertility, and she bears a daughter named Ira. After years of working, and several sons later, the village is hit with a massive drought and the crops fail. With a large family to support, their food stocks go to an all time low. With everyone in the village starving, Kunthi, hoping to regain her lost beauty, visits Rukmani and asks for rice, or she will tell Nathan that she visited Kenny. After many days of famine, Rukmani¿s infant Kuti dies. Ira becomes a prostitute, and Rukmani¿s sons go off in search of jobs. Soon, Nathan¿s employer sells the land to another, and Rukmani and her husband must leave town to find a son. After many miles of harsh traveling conditions, they enter a large city, and try to adjust to life there. They are pick pocketed, stolen from, and driven to near starvation looking for a son they might never find. Kamala Markandaya really came through here. Instead of a dull, plodding book, I found a book that is full of happiness, sadness, and hope that I haven¿t read in a book yet. When I first got the book, I thought it would be a dumb educational book about India. Once I started reading, my mind changed. It certainly kept me entertained. While entertaining, I also learned a bit about Indian culture. A girl of twelve can get married, rice is one of the main crops of India, and there are a plethora of Indian words used frequently in the book, all defined in the back of the book. Anyone who enjoys reading about the life of a family in poverty, life in India, or just wants something to do for a few hours should definitely pick up this book. Though it¿s by no means a masterpiece, it is definitely worth the time and couple of bucks to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2007

    My Book Review

    My Synopsis on Nectar In A Sieve I felt this book was incredible to read and I would recommend this to anyone who is interested in foreign cultures and people. I actually cried and felt as though I truly knew the main character, almost experiencing the pain and hardship with her that she felt everyday. This book impacted my life and made me see how grateful I should be. I don¿t think that I could have handled half of the things she went through. This greatly shows what a strong and determined person Rukmani was. I greatly admired her character and the way she was always able to look at a situation in a positive manner. Nectar In a Sieve is most definitely a book worth reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2007

    Eh......

    The book is about a young girl by the name of Rukmani who is married at a very young age to a farmer boy by the name of Nathan. This poor young girl had to work day after day in the field with her husband in order to star alive in the harsh times. What made this difficult was the fact that the land was going through a drought, monsoons, and always the problem of insects. The life she was about to live would never get any more simple. She was such a young child, and yet was almost forced to give birth because it was almost needed by a man to bare children. Of course, she was very scared and worried that this horrid lifestyle would not work, but her husband Nathan was always by her side to calm her down. After about a year she gives birth to her first child, Ira. She is amazed by the beauty of the child because her and Nathan are not the two greatest looking people. At first things start going good with the crop and everything, until a monsoon destroys it. Even though Nathan and her lived in poverty, they bore five more sons after Ira, giving them less and less food to eat. Ira eventually marries just as her mother had to a husband that would eventually leave her because she could not conceive just like her mother was unable too

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    A good historical fiction read

    The novel Nectar in a Sieve by Kamala Markandaya follows the long and tragic life of a young woman, Rukmanni, who is thrown into this type of life at the early age of12. The book follows her from her wedding day until the end of the troubles she endures in her life. It is hard not to enjoy the strong and caring character of Rukmanni, who despite the troubles thrown to her, maintains a optimistic and controlled manner even in the worst circumstances. She is a wonderful wife and mother to her family she puts the well being of her children and husband before herself and would do anything to ensure there success. When Rukmanni leaves to live with her husband Nathan in a small village, she meets the neighboring women, Kali, Janaki, and Kali. Their relationship, though it takes a turn later on, is kind and warm, since they are like a new family to here because she has moved far from her original home. In this new village she works on the rice fields with her husband. Though the land is not theirs, they live in a house near by. She enoys her quite ife in town until things take a turn for the worst.First, a giant tannery is built in the middle of town, bringing in more people and noise to the once peaceful village. Rukmanni absolutely despises the tannery. Then two of her sons leave to work there. A few years later, they get a surprise visit from their already-married-off daughter, Ira. She has been unable to bear children for her husband, so he has decided to leave her. She is forced then to live with her mother and father, along with her younger brothers. Later, worst of all, their is a great flooding of the village. Their rice is destroyed and they go into poverty. The lack of food and money leads to the death's of their last two sons and her daughter prostituting to earn money to live. When there are first signs of fate turning good, even more troubles come their way. Despite all this, Rukmanni keeps her head and remains a strong and unbreakable spirit. All in all, this was a wonderful read. The book was very detailed and made you feel like you actually knew Rukmanni. Also, coming from a completely different lifestyle, I enjoyed learning about this cultures way of life and cultural values. It is not a very long book page wise, but it is a long story with many interesting events. Like all books, it is not a book for everyone, but if you enjoy historical fiction novels and tales of people who overcome their hardships to have a better life, you will absolutely love this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2007

    da' shizznit

    Ruknami is a strong woman who faces many hardships growing up in a demanding life. However, in the process she learns to never give up for the people she loves. I¿m impressed by the way the talented Kamala blended such a strong message with an equally strong setting. I believe everyone, male and female, should read Nectar in a Sieve because it can teach us all a little something we don¿t know.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    Nectar In A Sieve, Book Review

    My personal thought about the book, Nectar in a Sieve, was that I loved it. In the beginning it was hard to understand and follow it, but towards the middle I couldn¿t put it down. I really enjoyed reading it. It was interesting and intriguing. I never really thought about reading books like this. But, after reading this I am a lot more interested in not only reading more books alike it, but more books from this author. She's a great writer, and a very interesting one too. Nectar In A Sieve, is a great and interesting read, and I would completely recommend it too any reader at a highschool or higher reading level.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2007

    Dull, Unmotivating, and Utterly Drab

    My expectations for a novel have never started this high and fallen so low, demonstrating the blandness and underachievement of Kamala Markandaya. Though told through the perspective of and old woman named Rukmani, there is no real voice to support such a tale. Overall, the whole novel was a complete failure, with such simplistic word choice and a foggy transition between time periods. At first, I was at least ready to read this book. I thought that I would jump into something that I could get into. However, after the first few chapters, the annoying back-and-forth storytelling from the old woman¿s point of view was finally stopped at her younger self¿s. However, this point of view became just as annoying because of the almost untold jump from year to year and back again. Before I knew it, Rukmani had gone to a young woman being married to a peasant farmer to an older woman with three sons and a daughter, and back to only her daughter. This became utterly frustrating. Basically, Rukmani begins around thirteen, married to a peasant farmer named Nathan, who loved her very much. The both work their farm in the small village they dwelled in. Soon, however, she meets Kenny, a doctor who helps her have a daughter, and an awkward transition shows her with three sons and a tannery being made in the village square, making farming less and less important. After much hardship, one son is murdered while trying to steal from the tannery to provide for his family, another son is born, and the droughts which decimated the rice paddies had ceased. Soon after, the youngest dies when the droughts return, Rukmani and Nathan¿s daughter becomes a prostitute. The hardships and plot twists seem to never cease, but the worst disaster isn¿t worth mentioning, seems it brings an end to everything. Though it was originally supposed to have been a tale narrated by an old woman who reflected on her life from early adulthood, the only times she could actually seem old was in the beginning. The end stayed with her at whatever age she ended up in. Maybe she was elderly at the end, but there was no voice to support such idea. Overall, if you are still curious about Nectar in a Sieve, don¿t get your hopes up. I would avoid this book at all costs, seems the plot appears to have jumped from situation to situation to situation and year to year. If there was one positive thing about this story, it was that the idea was original, and I can¿t hide the fact that I was a bit intrigued by numerous parts of it. I only had a hard time when I hit the point of the hospital that Kenny built, because this section was unbearably long. Kenny was characterized as very rich with thousands of the Indian currency, the rupee. However, all this money could have saved Rukmani¿s family, and imagine my shock when she found this out and showed no reaction to this fact. Overall, I rest my explanation of this book as a complete flop, with the most irritating bunch of twists and turns, filled with a dilapidated and pathetic word choice. The only person who seemed halfway intelligent was Kenny while his frustration for the poor people in the village reached its peak. His outbursts were easily understandable. Just avoid Nectar in a Sieve. I had to crawl to the very end, exasperating every once of concentration just to stoop down to its level and find out the blurry ending with plenty of Rukmani¿s life ahead of her.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 19, 2007

    boring

    this was very boring book and difficult to read through. it made no sense at all. kamala markandaya books are very boring. dont ever read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2006

    Living in Hope and Fear

    Nectar in a Sieve By Kamala Markandaya Review by Breana Living in Hope and Fear When I first received this book from my teacher, I didn¿t think much of it I believed that it was going to be another ¿educational¿ boring book that my classmates and I had to read for a grade. Then, I sat down and began to read Nectar in a Sieve by Kamala Markandaya, and my perspective started to change. At first it wasn¿t the most interesting story I had ever read, but throughout the story I became intrigued about the hardships of which the main character Rukmani faced while living in India. The story is told by Rukmani herself and all through the story, she gives vivid details on her perspectives of situations and the feelings she experienced during different situations, whether it be examining her crops grow each new season or when times were harsh and money was low. ¿With each tender seedling that unfurled its small green leaf to my eager gaze, my excitement would rise and mount winged, wondrous.¿ From these details, it felt as those she was a real person who, at one point in time, truly experienced all of the challenges she came across while traveling on her path through life. Nathan is Rukmani¿s husband, and they had such a profound love for one another that was true and sheer. He helped Rukmani grow from a child to an adult, and together they faced the challenges of managing farmland and raising children. There is always one character in a story that acts almost as a guardian angel towards the main character that is in need of guidance. This character in Nectar in a Sieve was Kenny, a doctor who came and went as he pleased throughout the story. He is an innocent bystander of the story who tries to understand the India customs and tries to help the people during their times of need. He was there for Rukmani when she needed to conceive a son to make her husband proud and helped take care of her family when they were ill. Kenny would always try to understand the ways of the India people and try to lend them a helping hand whenever he could. In the story, I had to piece together with what information they gave me about the Indian way of life. From this information, I learned that a girl of at least twelve years of age could be married off to a stranger that a matchmaker or family member chose. It was expected that the wives conceived a son or sons so that they can carry forth in their father¿s business. Their religion involved praying to the gods and goddesses for guidance and blessings often, farmers would go to temples so they could pray for a good harvest and have their seeds be blessed. Pride was also very important to the people of the story Rukmani would let pride overcome her in some situations where she would rather starve and scavenge for food than beg. This is one trait of the India people which I do not like, because it is very foolish to not call on for help when in need. The setting of the story takes place in India, before electricity and cars were invented. It was a time of oil lamps and bullock carts. In the story, Rukmani gives immense details on the surroundings about her. You can visualize the ¿blue skies and tender trees¿ before her and the ¿trickling river¿ flowing. All through the story, it also describes the changes that India is undergoing and the resentment that Rukmani has towards these changes she wants life to be simple without the hustle and bustle of the city and be able to see wide open plains and clear blue skies. Rukmani is the type of character that likes to live in a peaceful life and appreciate the world surrounding her, instead of always worrying about the time and never noticing the world around. Even though these people were more successful with wealth than Rukmani and her family, she loved where she lived. I relate to Rukmani in this scenario, because I enjoy watching the sun set on the horizon and seeing the color change of the sky smelling the daisies

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