Need, Speed, and Greed: How the New Rules of Innovation Can Transform Businesses, Propel Nations to Greatness, and Tame the World's Most Wicked Problems [NOOK Book]

Overview

Over the past few decades, globalization and Googlization have kicked off the first phase of an innovation revolution more profound and more powerful than any economic force since the arrival of Europeans on North American shores half a millennium ago. These developments have brought us such advances as the Web, social networking, 24/7 connectivity, and global markets.

But the benefits of all this progress have not been shared fairly among all. It is true that the elites of ...

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Need, Speed, and Greed: How the New Rules of Innovation Can Transform Businesses, Propel Nations to Greatness, and Tame the World's Most Wicked Problems

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Overview

Over the past few decades, globalization and Googlization have kicked off the first phase of an innovation revolution more profound and more powerful than any economic force since the arrival of Europeans on North American shores half a millennium ago. These developments have brought us such advances as the Web, social networking, 24/7 connectivity, and global markets.

But the benefits of all this progress have not been shared fairly among all. It is true that the elites of Mumbai are closer today to the elites of Manhattan than they were two decades ago, but what about Kansas? The hard-working salarymen of the developed world are not getting wealthier, but the economic elites who have mastered the new rules of global innovation are. Even as rural women in Africa and Asia have seen their lives transformed by mobile phones and the Internet, the middle classes and blue-collar workers in prosperous countries everywhere have been squeezed by the new global realities. And as the first phase of the innovation revolution gives way to a much greater transformation, America and other rich societies must find a path to inclusive growth or else risk being left behind by history.

All this leads to the central political and economic question of our age: How can the extraordinary benefits of the innovation revolution be shared more equitably among all of society? In Need, Speed, and Greed, global correspondent for the Economist Vijay V. Vaitheeswaran answers that question, offering the essential insider’s guide to this new world of innovation. Drawing on the best of the academic and field work in this emerging area, Need, Speed, and Greed inspires and empowers readers to improve their lives, their work, and perhaps even the world.

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Editorial Reviews

Paul Saffo
“Need, Speed, and Greed is an absorbing and deeply insightful guide to the wild new landscape of global innovation. It is a must-read for strategists and entrepreneurs alike.
Juan Enriquez
“A great Atlas for worlds known and unknown”
Library Journal
In his latest book, Vaitheeswaran (correspondent, Economist; Power to the People: How the Coming Energy Revolution Will Transform an Industry, Change Our Lives, and Maybe Even Save the Planet) focuses on innovation and its key role in global competitiveness. He stresses that innovation should be thought of as "fresh thinking that creates something valuable, whether for individuals, firms, or society at large." He urges readers to recognize "innovation is not a zero-sum game" (e.g., China's economic success does not indicate a failure of the U.S. economy), think locally, act globally (e.g., create coalitions), turn risk into reward through resilience, relearn how to learn, and remember that the path from stagnation to rejuvenation runs through innovation. Vaitheeswaran provides case studies throughout to illustrate innovation practices in companies and ways of finding ideas to innovate services in companies, and he refers to major studies on innovation. VERDICT A thought-provoking work that provides new ways of thinking about innovation with reference to competing in global markets. Of benefit primarily to scholars, professors of business, and graduate and postgraduate students.—Lucy Heckman, St. John's Univ. Lib., Queens, NY
Kirkus Reviews
A correspondent for the Economist offers an insightful assessment of the changing global economy, complete with recommendations for how companies can thrive in a perpetually disruptive environment. Today's dizzying pace of innovation, and the attendant economic upheaval, represents both a challenge and an opportunity for businesses and consumers alike. Vaitheeswaran (ZOOM: The Global Race to Fuel the Car of the Future, 2007, etc.) tries to make sense of the chaos by focusing on the need for an uptick in the pace of innovation, the frighteningly exhilarating speed at which it's happening and the transformative power of self-interest--that is, how greed has the potential to benevolently speed the coming of the postindustrial age. His examples of the problems created by globalization--which range from the threat of rapidly spreading "super bugs" to supply-chain disruptions created by natural disasters--are powerful, as is his case for how savvy decision makers can leverage new technology and means of communication to tap into innovative ideas in every corner of the globe. Examples of the latter include behemoth "dinosaurs" like Proctor & Gamble opening up their research and design function to encourage contributions from outside sources and medical device makers in China finding ways to produce portable, economical versions of previously astronomically priced testing equipment. Only a few fanciful tangents, including a discourse on "the Singularity"--the point at which machines will surpass humans in intelligence--and the author's well-intentioned but occasionally cumbersome attempts to provide a fully balanced account of the positives and negatives of technological progress mar this otherwise exemplary narrative. The perfect primer for the postindustrial age.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062096715
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/13/2012
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 1,075,449
  • File size: 779 KB

Meet the Author

Vijay V. Vaitheeswaran is an award-winning global correspondent for the <i>Economist</i>. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, an adviser to the World Economic Forum, and an adjunct faculty member at NYU’s Stern School of Business. He is also the author of Zoom: The Global Race to Fuel the Car of the Future (co-authored with Iain Carson), and Power to the People: How the Coming Energy Revolution Will Transform an Industry, Change Our Lives, and Maybe Even Save the Planet. His op-eds have appeared in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, and he is a regular guest on NPR’s Marketplace, PBS’s NewsHour, ABC’s Nightline, and other leading programs.
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Table of Contents

Introduction: Welcome to the Ideas Economy 1

Part 1 NEED: Why Innovation Matters

1 Wicked Problems, Wiki Solutions 21

2 Cheap and Cheerful 51

3 Of Stagnation and Rejuvenation 69

Part 2 SPEED: Where Innovation Is Going

4 The Singularity and Its Discontents 91

5 So Long, Silo 107

6 Black Swan Kills Sitting Duck 136

Part 3 GREED: How to Win in the Age of Disruptive Innovation

7 The Sputnik Fallacies 163

8 Can Dinosaurs Dance? 196

9 Greed for Good 219

Conclusion: We Are All Innovators Now 251

Acknowledgments 263

Notes 265

Index 281

About the Author 293

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 29, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Zoom co-author Vijay V. Vaitheeswaran blends the old and the new

    Zoom co-author Vijay V. Vaitheeswaran blends the old and the new to produce something striking in his latest examination of innovation. Vaitheeswaran, The Economist’s China business editor, mixes familiar points – the world is globalizing, innovation is essential – with surprising insights – innovation has innate dangers. The book’s title refers to three key aspects of innovation: the need to innovate now, the speed of approaching singularity and the direction of innovation, and greed for what success looks like today, though the author actually warns against greediness. However, perhaps because portions of the text already appeared in The Economist as distinct articles, the various sections don’t always fully integrate. That caveat aside, every reader is sure to find something new and useful. getAbstract recommends this smart, interesting exegesis to innovators, those managing innovators and anyone who wants to prepare for a changing world.

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