Neighbours and Successors of Rome: Traditions of glass production and use in Europe and the Middle East in the later 1st millennium AD

Overview

Presented through 20 case studies covering Europe and the Near East, Neighbours and Successors of Rome investigates development in the production of glass and the mechanisms of the wider glass economy as part of a wider material culture in Europe and the Near East around the later first millennium AD. Though highlighting and solidifying chronology, patterns of distribution, and typology, the primary aims of the collection are to present a new methodology that emphasises regional...
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Overview

Presented through 20 case studies covering Europe and the Near East, Neighbours and Successors of Rome investigates development in the production of glass and the mechanisms of the wider glass economy as part of a wider material culture in Europe and the Near East around the later first millennium AD. Though highlighting and solidifying chronology, patterns of distribution, and typology, the primary aims of the collection are to present a new methodology that emphasises regional workshops, scientific data, and the wider trade culture.

By twinning a critique of archaeometric methods with the latest archaeological research, the contributors present a foundation for glass research, seen through the lens of consumption demands and geographical necessity, that analyses production centres and traditional typological knowledge. In so doing the they bridge an important divide by demonstrating the co-habitability of diverse approaches and disciplines, linking, for example, the production of Campanulate bowls from Gallaecia with the burgeoning international late antique style. Equally, the particular details of those pieces allow us to identify a regional style as well as local production. As such this compilation provides a highly valuable resource for archaeologists, anthropologists, and art historians.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781782973973
  • Publisher: Oxbow Books Limited
  • Publication date: 5/30/2014
  • Pages: 352
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 11.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Table of Contents

Contents:

Acknowledgments

Glass from the later first millennium AD: current state of research
(Daniel Keller, Jennifer Price and Caroline Jackson)

The last Roman glass in Britain: recycling at the periphery of the empire
(Caroline Jackson and Harriet Foster)

Opaque yellow glass production in the early medieval period: new evidence
(James R. N. Peake and Ian C. Freestone)

The vessel glass assemblage from Anglo-Saxon occupation at West Heslerton, North Yorkshire
(Rose Broadley)

Glassworking at Whitby Abbey and Kirkdale Minster in North Yorkshire
(Sarah Paynter, Sarah Jennings and Jennifer Price)

Glass workshops in northern Gaul and the Rhineland in the first millennium AD as hints of a changing land use – including some results of the chemical analyses of glass from Mayen
(Martin Grünewald and Sonngard Hartmann)

Campanulate bowls from Gallaecia: evidence for regional glass production in late antiquity
(Mário da Cruz)

The Wilshere Collection of late Roman gold-glass at the Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford
(Susan Walker)

The “proto-history” of Venetian glassmaking
(David Whitehouse)

Late Roman glass from South Pannonia and the problem of its origin
(Mia Leljak)

Glass supply and consumption in the late Roman and early Byzantine site Dichin, northern Bulgaria
(Thilo Rehren and Anastasia Cholakova)

An early Christian glass workshop at 45, Vasileos Irakleiou Street in the centre of Thessaloniki
(Anastassios Ch. Antonaras)

Glass tesserae from Hagios Polyeuktos, Constantinople: their early Byzantine affiliations
(Nadine Schibille and Judith McKenzie)

Successors of Rome? Byzantine Glass Mosaics
(Liz James)

Glass from the Byzantine Palace at Ephesus in Turkey
(Sylvia Fünfschilling)

Late Roman and early Byzantine glass from Heliopolis/Baalbek
(Hanna Hamel and Susanne Greiff)

Changes in glass supply in southern Jordan in the later first millennium AD
(Susanne Greiff and Daniel Keller)

Egyptian glass abroad: HIMT glass and its markets
(Marie-Dominique Nenna)

Continuity and change in Byzantine and early Islamic glass from Syene/Aswan and Elephantine, Egypt
(Daniel Keller)

Sasanian glass: an overview
(St John Simpson)

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