Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South / Edition 1

Neither Lady nor Slave: Working Women of the Old South / Edition 1

by Susanna Delfino, Michele Gillespie
     
 

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ISBN-10: 0807827355

ISBN-13: 9780807827352

Pub. Date: 10/28/2002

Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press

Although historians over the past two decades have written extensively on the plantation mistress and the slave woman, they have largely neglected the world of the working woman. Neither Lady nor Slave pushes southern history beyond the plantation to examine the lives and labors of ordinary southern women—white, free black, and Indian.

Contributors

Overview

Although historians over the past two decades have written extensively on the plantation mistress and the slave woman, they have largely neglected the world of the working woman. Neither Lady nor Slave pushes southern history beyond the plantation to examine the lives and labors of ordinary southern women—white, free black, and Indian.

Contributors to this volume illuminate women's involvement in the southern market economy in all its diversity. Thirteen essays explore the working lives of a wide range of women—nuns and prostitutes, iron workers and basket weavers, teachers and domestic servants—in urban and rural settings across the South. By highlighting contrasts between paid and unpaid, officially acknowledged and "invisible" work within the context of cultural attitudes regarding women's proper place in society, the book sheds new light on the ambiguities that marked relations between race, class, and gender in the modernizing South.

Contributors E. Susan Barber, College of Notre Dame of Maryland (Baltimore, Md.)
Bess Beatty, Oregon State University (Eugene, Ore.)
Emily Bingham (Louisville, Ky.)
James Taylor Carson, Queen's University (Kingston, Ontario, Canada)
Emily Clark, University of Southern Mississippi (Hattiesburg, Miss.)
Stephanie Cole, University of Texas at Arlington (Arlington, Tex.)
Susanna Delfino, University of Genoa (Genoa, Italy)
Michele Gillespie, Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, N.C.)
Sarah Hill (Atlanta, Ga.)
Barbara J. Howe, West Virginia University (Morgantown, W. Va.)
Timothy J. Lockley, University of Warwick (Coventry, England)
Stephanie McCurry, Northwestern University (Evanston, Ill.)
Diane Batts Morrow, University of Georgia (Athens, Ga.)
Penny L. Richards, UCLA Center for the Study of Women (Los Angeles, Calif.)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807827352
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
10/28/2002
Edition description:
1
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 9.25(h) x 0.99(d)

Table of Contents

Introduction

Part I. The Rural World and the Coming of the Market Economy

James Taylor Carson

Chapter 2. Made by the Hands of Indians: Cherokee Women and Trade

Sarah H. Hill

Chapter 3. Producing Dependence: Women, Work, and Yeoman Households in Low-Country South Carolina

Stephanie McCurry

Part II. Wage-Earning Women in the Urban South

Chapter 4. A White Woman, of Middle Age, Would Be Preferred: Children's Nurses in the Old South

Stephanie Cole

Chapter 5. Spheres of Influence: Working White and Black Women in Antebellum Savannah

Timothy J. Lockley

Chapter 6. Patient Laborers: Women at Work in the Formal Economy of West(ern) Virginia

Barbara J. Howe

Part III. Women as Unacknowledged Professionals

Chapter 7. Depraved and Abandoned Women: Prostitution in Richmond, Virginia, across the Civil War

E. Susan Barber

Chapter 8. The Female Academy and Beyond: Mordecai Sisters at Work in the Old South

Emily Bingham and Penny Richards

Chapter 9. Peculiar Professionals: The Financial Strategies of the New Orleans Ursulines

Emily Clark

Chapter 10. Faith and Frugality in Antebellum Baltimore: The Economic Credo of the Oblate Sisters of Providence

Diane Batts Morrow

Part IV. Working Women in the Industrial South

Chapter 11. I Can't Get My Bored on Them Old Lomes: The Work and Resistance of Female Textile Laborers in the Antebellum South

Bess Beatty

Chapter 12. To Harden a Lady's Hand: Gender Politics, Racial Realities, and Women Millworkers in Antebellum Georgia

Michele Gillespie

Chapter 13. Invisible Woman: Female Labor in the Upper South's Iron and Mining Industries

Susanna Delfino

Contributors

Index

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