Neither Wolf nor Dog: American Indians, Environment, and Agrarian Change / Edition 1

Neither Wolf nor Dog: American Indians, Environment, and Agrarian Change / Edition 1

by David Rich Lewis
     
 

During the nineteenth century, Americans looked to the eventual civilization and assimilation of Native Americans through a process of removal, reservation, and directed culture change. Underlying American Indian policy was a belief in a developmental stage theory of human societies in which agriculture marked the passage between barbarism and civilization. Solving… See more details below

Overview

During the nineteenth century, Americans looked to the eventual civilization and assimilation of Native Americans through a process of removal, reservation, and directed culture change. Underlying American Indian policy was a belief in a developmental stage theory of human societies in which agriculture marked the passage between barbarism and civilization. Solving the "Indian Problem" appeared as simple as teaching Indians to settle down and farm and then disappear into mainstream American society. Such policies for directed subsistence change and incorporation had far-reaching social and environmental consequences for native peoples and native lands. This study explores the experiences of three groups - Northern Utes, Hupas, and Tohono O'odhams - with settled reservation and allotted agriculture in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Each group inhabited a different environment, and their cultural traditions reflected distinct subsistence adaptations to life in the western United States. Each experienced the full weight of federal agrarian policy yet responded differently, in culturally consistent ways, to subsistence change and the resulting social and environmental consequences. Attempts to establish successful agricultural economies ultimately failed as each group reproduced its own cultural values in a diminished and rapidly changing environment. In the end, such policies and agrarian experiences left Indian farmers economically dependent and on the periphery of American society.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195117943
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
10/28/1997
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.60(d)

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations
Introduction3
1Agriculture, Civilization, and American Indian Policy7
2Nuciu, the Northern Ute People22
3Agriculture and the Northern Utes34
4Hupa, the People of Natinook71
5Farming and the Changing Harvest Economy in Hoopa Valley84
6Tohono O'odham, the Desert People118
7The Tohono O'odham and Agricultural Change133
Conclusion168
Abbreviations177
Notes179
Index231

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >