Neither Wolf Nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder / Edition 2

Neither Wolf Nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder / Edition 2

4.4 21
by Kent Nerburn, Ken Nerburn
     
 

ISBN-10: 1577312333

ISBN-13: 9781577312338

Pub. Date: 08/28/2002

Publisher: New World Library

In this 1996 Minnesota Book Award winner, Kent Nerburn draws the reader deep into the world of an Indian elder known only as Dan. It’s a world of Indian towns, white roadside cafes, and abandoned roads that swirl with the memories of the Ghost Dance and Sitting Bull. Readers meet vivid characters like Jumbo, a 400-pound mechanic, and Annie, an 80-year-old

…  See more details below

Overview

In this 1996 Minnesota Book Award winner, Kent Nerburn draws the reader deep into the world of an Indian elder known only as Dan. It’s a world of Indian towns, white roadside cafes, and abandoned roads that swirl with the memories of the Ghost Dance and Sitting Bull. Readers meet vivid characters like Jumbo, a 400-pound mechanic, and Annie, an 80-year-old Lakota woman living in a log cabin. Threading through the book is the story of two men struggling to find a common voice. Neither Wolf nor Dog takes readers to the heart of the Native American experience. As the story unfolds, Dan speaks eloquently on the difference between land and property, the power of silence, and the selling of sacred ceremonies. This edition features a new introduction by the author. “This is a sobering, humbling, cleansing, loving book, one that every American should read.” — Yoga Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781577312338
Publisher:
New World Library
Publication date:
08/28/2002
Edition description:
Second Edition
Pages:
335
Sales rank:
78,749
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x (d)

Table of Contents

Contents

FOREWORD,
INTRODUCTION,
CHAPTER 1 An Old Man's Request,
CHAPTER 2 Burnt Offerings,
CHAPTER 3 Talking for the Grandfathers,
CHAPTER 4 One Wily Old Indian,
CHAPTER 5 A Land of Dreams and Phantasms,
CHAPTER 6 Junk Cars and Buffalo Carcasses,
CHAPTER 7 Rooting for the Cowboys,
CHAPTER 8 Taking Maize from Squanto,
CHAPTER 9 Jumbo,
CHAPTER 10 Ponytails and Jewelry,
CHAPTER 11 The Selling of the Sacred,
CHAPTER 12 Welcome to Our Land,
CHAPTER 13 Tatanka,
CHAPTER 14 Seeing with Both Eyes,
CHAPTER 15 Shiny Soup,
CHAPTER 16 The Stranger,
CHAPTER 17 Leaders and Rulers,
CHAPTER 18 Drunk on Jesus,
CHAPTER 19 Pushing,
CHAPTER 20 Revelations,
CHAPTER 21 Half-breed,
CHAPTER 22 The Song of History,
CHAPTER 23 Storm,
CHAPTER 24 Paha Sapa,
CHAPTER 25 Wounded Knee,
CHAPTER 26 The Promise,
ABOUT THE AUTHOR,
The Wolf at Twilight,

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Neither Wolf Nor Dog: On Forgotten Roads with an Indian Elder 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Greywolf_Borealis More than 1 year ago
I read The Wolf at Twilight first and am sorry I did. The books should be read in the order in which they were written. However, Neither Wolf Nor Dog stands alone as a great account of Dan's experiences and the literal torture that the Red Man has had to endure. Mr. Nerburn was afraid that he wouldn't "get the story right," but he does. I enjoyed this book so much that I bought the Chief Joseph book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book because Nerburn nails the attitudes and ignorance that some white people have that we Lakota are subjected to every summer and everytime a new documentary or movie about one of our reservations comes out. What is great about this book is that Nerburn is honest in his writing about his own clumbsiness and ignorance but in a humorous and gentle way without being self-depricating as he slowly comes to important self and cultural realizations. I really liked the book, as a Lakota who has seen first hand some of the behaviors,language,cultural innapropriateness he discusses; it provided me with many a laugh,(on his behalf) and in the end I had more compassion for white ignorance. In the end, he grows as a human and thats incredible to witness. I'm a Nerburn fan now and strongly recommend this book and the follow up the wolf at twilight. Read it for the cultural awareness message but then apply what you learned to your own life, where ever you are.
Sarah Williams More than 1 year ago
A must read by all! I will pass this book on several times!
Neemah More than 1 year ago
some really good points made in this book. stop, listen, think
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I happened upon this book at a Native American Pow Wow with no previous exposure to the author or his works. Being an enthusiast for stories both fiction and non-fiction on the cuture I took a chance and picked it up. Whether you are interested in Native American culture or not, reading this book will give you the opportunity to consider alternative perspectives on life. Kent Nerburn draws you in with an engaging and compeling story telling style that I greatly admire. This book propelled me to become a fan and reader of additional Nerburn books. I highly recommend it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was amazing! I had to read for a high school class and the philosophy and ideas in it just blew me away. Yes, Dan had a lot of problems himself and he wasn't perfect, but I felt that it just added to the validity of what he was saying. In particular, the idea that leaders are not leaders because they are elected really interested me leaders are naturally made and therefore elections are not valid indications of a person's ability. I recommend this book to anyone interested in learning more about the Native American way of life and just philosophy in general!
Guest More than 1 year ago
poses some extremely thought provoking ideas, many of which i thought made more sense than i could imagine, however i think it maybe sort of a contradiction..dan trusts few white people, obviously does not like them too much but however, is allowing Nerburn and white publishing companies to profit from his stories? i don't know maybe there's something else behind that that i don't know. BUT other than that, i thought the book was amazing and i think everyone in the US should read it if they know what's good for them.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
:)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I have read this book several times since it's release. I have bought and given out many copies to friends. It is an eye opening look into a world that is not often seen.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Interesting from a historical point of view. I felt the Native American was a very angry person about his life He did not relay any positive thoughts about his life onto the reader. Many times he would twist the white mans life around to say we were trying to act like the Native American, such as by wearing their type of jewelry. I feel the Indian Elder was a whiner.