Nemesis: A Miss Marple Mystery [NOOK Book]

Overview

Even the unflappable Miss Marple is astounded as she reads the letter addressed to her on instructions from the recently deceased tycoon Mr. Jason Rafiel, whom she had met on holiday in the West Indies (A Caribbean Mystery). Recognizing in her a natural flair for justice and a genius for crime-solving, Mr. Rafiel has bequeathed to Miss Marple a £20,000 legacy -- and a legacy of an entirely different sort. For he has asked Miss Marple to investigate...his own murder. The only problem is, Mr. Rafiel has failed to ...

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Nemesis: A Miss Marple Mystery

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Overview

Even the unflappable Miss Marple is astounded as she reads the letter addressed to her on instructions from the recently deceased tycoon Mr. Jason Rafiel, whom she had met on holiday in the West Indies (A Caribbean Mystery). Recognizing in her a natural flair for justice and a genius for crime-solving, Mr. Rafiel has bequeathed to Miss Marple a £20,000 legacy -- and a legacy of an entirely different sort. For he has asked Miss Marple to investigate...his own murder. The only problem is, Mr. Rafiel has failed to name a suspect or suspects. And, whoever they are, they will certainly be determined to thwart Miss Marple's inquiries -- no matter what it will take to stop her.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061753831
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 6/15/2004
  • Series: Miss Marple Mysteries
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 49,323
  • File size: 641 KB

Meet the Author

Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie is the most widely published author of all time, outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Her books have sold more than a billion copies in English and another billion in a hundred foreign languages. She died in 1976. Sophie Hannah is the internationally bestselling author of nine psychological thrillers, which have been published in more than 20 countries and adapted for television. Sophie is an Honorary Fellow of Lucy Cavendish College, Cambridge, and as a poet has been shortlisted for the TS Eliot Prize.

Biography

Agatha Christie is the world's best-known mystery writer. Her books have sold over a billion copies in the English language, and another billion in 44 foreign languages. She is the most widely published author of all time in any language, outsold only by the Bible and Shakespeare. Her writing career spanned more than half a century, during which she wrote 79 novels and a short story collection, as well as 14 plays, one of which, The Mousetrap, is the longest running play in history. Two of the characters she created, the brilliant Belgian detective Hercule Poirot and the irrepressible and relentless Miss Marple, went on to become world famous detectives. Both have been widely dramatized in feature films and made-for-TV movies. Agatha Christie died in 1976.

Author biography courtesy of Random House, Inc.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Mary Westmacott (used for her romantic fiction)
    1. Date of Birth:
      September 15, 1890
    2. Place of Birth:
      Torquay, Devon, England
    1. Date of Death:
      January 12, 1976

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

OVERTURE

In the afternoons it was the custom of Miss Jane Marple to unfold her second newspaper. Two newspapers were delivered at her house every morning. The first one Miss Marple read while sipping tier early morning tea, that is, if it was delivered in time. The boy who delivered the papers was notably erratic in his management of time. Frequently, too, there was either a new boy or a boy who was acting temporarily as a stand-in for the first one. And each one would have ideas of his own as to the geographical route that he should take in delivering. Perhaps it varied monotony for him. But those customers who were used to reading their paper early so that they could snap up the more saucy items in the day's news before departing for their bus, train or other means of progress to the day's work were annoyed if the papers were late, though the middle-aged and elderly ladies who resided peacefully in St. Mary Mead often preferred to read a newspaper propped up on their breakfast table.

Today, Miss Marple had absorbed the front page and a few other items in the daily paper that she had nicknamed "The Daily All-Sorts," this being a slightly satirical allusion to the fact that her paper, the Daily Newsgiver, owing to a change of proprietor, to her own and to other of her friends' great annoyance, now provided articles on men's tailoring, women's dress, female hearthrobs, competitions for children, and complaining letters from women and had managed pretty well to shove any real news off any part of it but the front page, or to some obscure comer where it was impossible to find it. Miss Marple, being old-fashioned, preferredher newspapers to be newspapers and give you news.

In the afternoon, having finished her luncheon, treated herself to twenty minutes' nap in a specially purchased, upright armchair which catered for the demands of her rheumatic back, she had opened The Times, which lent itself still to a more leisurely perusal. Not that The Times was what it used to be. The maddening thing about The Times was that you couldn't find anything any more. Instead of going through from the front page and knowing where everything else was so that you passed easily to any special articles on subjects in which you were interested, there were now extraordinary interruptions to this time-honoured program. Two pages were suddenly devoted to travel in Capri with illustrations. Sport appeared with far more prominence than it had ever had in the old days. Court news and obituaries were a little more faithful to routine. The births, marriages and deaths which had at one time occupied Miss Marple's attention first of all owing to their prominent position had migrated to a different part of The Times, though of late, Miss Marple noted, they had come almost permanently to rest on the back page.

Miss Marple gave her attention first to the main news on the front page. She did not linger long on that because it was equivalent to what she had already read this morning, though possibly couched in a slightly more dignified manner. She cast her eye down the table of contents. Articles, comments, science, sport; then she pursued her usual plan, turned the paper over and had a quick run down the births, marriages and deaths, after which she proposed to turn to the page given to correspondence, where she nearly always found something to enjoy; from that she passed on to the Court Circular, on which page today's news from the sale rooms could also be found. A short article on science was often placed there, but she did not propose to read that. It seldom made sense for her.

Having turned the paper over as usual to the births, marriages and deaths, Miss Marple thought to herself, as so often before:

"It's sad really, but nowadays one is only interested in the deaths! "

People had babies, but the people who had babies were not likely to be even known by name to Miss Marple. If there had been a column dealing with babies labelled as grandchildren, there might have been some chance of a pleasurable recognition. She might have thought to herself-.

"Really, Mary Prendergast has had a third granddaughter!" though even that perhaps might have been a bit remote.

She skimmed down Marriages, also with not a very close survey, because most of her old friends' daughters or sons had married some years ago already. She came to the Deaths column and gave that her more serious attention. Gave it enough, in fact, so as to be sure she would not miss a name. Alloway, Angopastro, Arden, Barton, Bedshaw, Burgoweisser (dear me, what a Gerawn name, but he seemed to be late of Leeds). Camperdown, Carpenter, Clegg. Clegg? Now was that one of the Cleggs she knew? No, it didn't seem to be. Janet Clegg. Somewhere in Yorkshire. McDonald, McKenzie, Nicholson. Nicholson? No. Again not a Nicholson she knew. Ogg, Ormerod -- that must be one of the aunts, she thought. Yes, probably so. Linda Ormerod. No, she hadn't known her. Quantril? Dear me, that must be Elizabeth Quantril. Eighty-five. Well, really! She had thought Elizabeth Quantril had died some years ago. Fancy her having lived so long! So delicate she'd always been, too. Nobody had expected her to make old bones. Race, Radley, Rafiel. Rafiel? Something stirred. That name was familiar. Rafiel. Belford Park, Maidstone. Belford Park, Maidstone. No, she couldn't recall that address. No flowers. Jason Rafiel. Oh, well, all unusual name. She supposed she'd just heard it somewhere. Ross-Perkins. Now that might be-no, it wasn't. Ryland? Emily Ryland. No. No, she'd never known an Emily Ryland. Deeply loved by her husband and children. Well, very nice or very sad, whichever way you liked....
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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 21 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 21 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 5, 2011

    Incorrect book description!

    The description or overview of this book says it is about the murder of a character in another novel by Agatha Christie. I had recently read and enjoyed that novel (A Caribbean Mystery) and chose to read Nemesis as a follow-up. However, the story line of Nemesis is NOT about Mr. Rafiel's murder. Instead, he asks Miss Marple to investigate a murder his son was blamed for. It was not only disappointing that the story wasn't what I expected, but it was also not one of the more intriguing novels by Agatha Christie.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2014

    Agatha Christie is always good.

    Very good book. Interesting characters, good story, and in well-written language. Always love A. Christie.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 22, 2012

    A little too talky

    Seems like she is padding--lots of long monologues

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 5, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    This is one of our favorites

    My daughter and I have purchased 16 of her novels on audio thus far and this one ranks up with the top ones we like. I definitely suggest this one and a very good listen, good plot, good twists, just an enjoyable story to listen to and try to guess who did the crime.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 3, 2003

    Unusual yet gripping

    This is surely one of Agatha Christie's better works. The mystrey from the past has to be uncovered without any clues to begin with. Miss Marple goes about her job slowly but surely to reveal the secret. Thrilling and gripping till the mystrey is solved.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2001

    First Cloudy, Then Bursting into a Ray of Light!!!!

    I read this book at the beginning of 2001, and it did not seem appealing at first, but soon became quite a book!! Miss Marple is at the top of her game, past the peak of her life! Enjoy!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2001

    An unusual but intriguing plot

    The book deserves being read by all AC fans for it's unusual beginning. Till for about a good 75 pages the reader is haunted as to what is the crime about that a dying man wants miss marple to investigate. Nothing is said as to about who is involved and when the crime had been committed. There are a number of characters though I wouln't say they all can be called suspects. But then the end wasn't very exciting because though you cannot guess the killer you are not happy when the killer is unmasked. There are in all 3 matters two in the past and one in the present. A dying man asks Miss Marple to bring about Nemesis which means bringing a retribution and for bringing the criminal to light fixes a contingent reward of 20,000 pounds for which she has to embark upon a tour where she would find a guardian angel.When Miss Marple receives the letter from the dying man's solicitor the dying man is a dead man for about a week. A murder is committed in course of the tour which has 11 bus passengers and 3 sisters living in a mansion as suspects. The brutality of the murder committed in the past which leads to the murder in the present is simply awful and a deviation from other AC books i would say. Also there is a lot of mentioning about rape and sexual assaults on young girls and the indifferent and delinquent young generation;and of course murder in this one which except for Halloween Party does not appear in her other books. This was written somewhere in the 1970s and probably because of the changed times she has included this element which is a pivotal one. Love being a 'frightening' word is what the story is about.Another hint is on the cover of the book which is a creeper kind of a plant called polygonum which too gives a lot of clue. Though the idea is interesting the book isnt - i wonder if AC had made it a point to make only Hercule POirot books intelligent. I find the so called investigations of M. Marple very dull though not as slow as Tommy and Tuppence Bensford who are a terribly boring duo.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted December 29, 2010

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    Posted September 7, 2011

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