Neo-Pragmatism, Communication, and the Culture of Creative Democracy

Overview

In exploring how John Dewey's notion of a "creative democracy" can be cultivated and advanced through a heightened awareness of the ways in which communication shapes individuals and society, this book helps scholars, activists, and citizens to rethink commonly accepted notions of community in order to imagine new possibilities for social, political, and economic organization—in short, new ways of imagining solidarity and citizenship with others, especially those who languish ...

See more details below
This Paperback is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

Overview

In exploring how John Dewey's notion of a "creative democracy" can be cultivated and advanced through a heightened awareness of the ways in which communication shapes individuals and society, this book helps scholars, activists, and citizens to rethink commonly accepted notions of community in order to imagine new possibilities for social, political, and economic organization—in short, new ways of imagining solidarity and citizenship with others, especially those who languish outside the range of our moral radar.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781433107313
  • Publisher: Lang, Peter Publishing, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 8/31/2009
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword Phillip K. Tompkins Tompkins, Phillip K.

Introduction 1

Ch. 1 Democracy and Diversity 9

Limitations of a Marketplace Diversity 15

Conclusion 20

Ch. 2 Social Justice and the Critical Imagination 24

Rejecting the Entertainment Model of Citizenship 29

Creative Democracy and the Importance of the Critical Imagination 35

Conclusion 41

Ch. 3 Communication as Epistemic and the Communicative Imagination 43

The Communicative Imagination 53

Conclusion 57

Ch. 4 Exploring Our Theoretical and Methodological Assumptions 60

The Critical Paradigm 63

Neo-Pragmatism 68

Conclusion 70

Ch. 5 Perspectivalism and Cosmopolitanism 75

Perspectivalism: De-Centering the "Real" 80

Conclusion 87

Ch. 6 The Contribution of Four Philosophers to This Project 89

Nietzsche, Cultural Criticism, and the "Good American" 89

Emerson and the Unattained Yet Attainable Self 96

Dewey's Democracy as a Moral Problem 97

Rorty's Anti-Foundationalism 101

Conclusion 105

Ch. 7 Alienation and Power 107

Power, Alienation, and Communication 108

Conclusion 118

Ch. 8 Contrasting Platonic and Critical Models of Education 123

Platonic v. Critical Models of Education 124

Critical Education 127

Conclusion 133

Ch. 9 Service Learning 135

Theoretical Bases of Service Learning 136

Social Justice-Oriented Service Learning 138

A Social Justice-Oriented Service Learning Model 140

Conclusion 149

Ch. 10 Final Remarks 150

References 153

Index 169

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)