The Nervous System and the Heart / Edition 1

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Overview

Gert Ter Horst and a panel of recognized experts illuminate the complexities and importance of heart-brain and brain-heart interactions in human health. These distinguished authorities critically review what is known about autonomic control of the heart, hypothalamo-pituitary- adrenal modulation, heart pain, modulation by humoral factors, and the relationship between cognitive/neuropsychiatric disorders and heart disease. Highly relevant and up-to-date, The Nervous System and the Heart offers the first comprehensive treatment of the important mutual interactions of the heart and the brain. By integrating specialist knowledge in cardiology with that from neuroscience, this important book constitutes a brilliant guide to today's novel approaches to neural control of the heart and consequent reduction of cardiovascular mortality.

The book contains black-and-white illustrations.

The heart and the brain have a bilateral physiological dependence so that they can both function properly. A consequence of this close relationship is that dysfunction in either organ will affect the other, which is apparent in the common coexistence of neuropathological and cardiovascular diseases. This book brings together a distinguished panel of authors who review various aspects of heart-brain interaction such as neuronal control, cardiac nociceptive mechanisms, and the nervous and humoral feedback systems. Its aim is to give a concise overview of all of the important heart-brain interaction mechanisms to a broad audience, ranging from the post-graduate level to specialized areas of experimental cardiology, psychiatry, pharmacology, and neurobiology.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Audris J. Bredikis, MD (Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine)
Description: An intimate relationship between CNS, the neurohumoral system, the autonomic nerve system, and regulation of the heart activity is described in this text.
Purpose: Although not clearly stated, I believe this book is written to cover in one book the large amount of new information about complex neurocardiac interactions.
Audience: This is an excellent resource for medical students, researchers, and clinicians (including neurologists, cardiologists, and psychiatrists).
Features: A wide area of complex interactions, starting from anatomy and organization of neural pathways both at CNS and peripheral levels and extending to humoral neuromodulation of the heart activities, are covered. Part I is an excellent, updated review of newer, non-classical neurotransmitters, emotional neurocircuitries, circadian regulation, and effects of neuropathology on cardiovascular regulation. The neuroanatomy section, in which the intracardiac nerve supply is described, could be enriched with human data regarding effects of surgical incisions and radio-frequency ablation in the areas rich with intracardiac ganglia on electrophysiological properties of sinus and atrioventricular nodes. Regarding the extracardiac nerve system, the role of stellate ganglion in mediating differential regional electrophysiological effects on sinus, atrioventricular node, and myocardium is clinically relevant and would be a nice addition to Part I as well. Part II is an excellent review of stress hormones and their effects on the heart. This chapter is a timely update on the complexity of physiological actions of stress hormones beyond ACTH. Cardiac pain is a subject of Part III, in which a detailed review of cardiac nociceptive system anatomy, pathophysioligy, clinical syndromes, and new insights into syndrome X is provided. The angiotensinogen II and vasopressin relationship and the role of angiotensinogen II receptor subtypes in the release of vasopressin are reviewed in a Part IV. Multi-level actions of renin-angiotensin system at peripheral and CNS levels in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis are described in Part IV as well. The role of mediators of inflammation in atherogenesis is also discussed. The relationship of neuropsychiatric disorders and cardiac disease and the association of depression with increased cardiovascular mortality are very interesting clinical topics and are well covered in the last chapter.
Assessment: This is a very timely and successful attempt to synthesize a huge amount of new information regarding complex neurocardiac interactions in one book. The clinical usefulness of this book would be enhanced by including a chapter on neural effects on cardiac arrhythmias as well as on important clinical syndromes, like long QT syndrome, carotid sinus syndrome, and neurocardiogenic syncope, which hopefully we will find in the next edition.
Audris J. Bredikis
An intimate relationship between CNS, the neurohumoral system, the autonomic nerve system, and regulation of the heart activity is described in this text. Although not clearly stated, I believe this book is written to cover in one book the large amount of new information about complex neurocardiac interactions. This is an excellent resource for medical students, researchers, and clinicians (including neurologists, cardiologists, and psychiatrists). A wide area of complex interactions, starting from anatomy and organization of neural pathways both at CNS and peripheral levels and extending to humoral neuromodulation of the heart activities, are covered. Part I is an excellent, updated review of newer, non-classical neurotransmitters, emotional neurocircuitries, circadian regulation, and effects of neuropathology on cardiovascular regulation. The neuroanatomy section, in which the intracardiac nerve supply is described, could be enriched with human data regarding effects of surgical incisions and radio-frequency ablation in the areas rich with intracardiac ganglia on electrophysiological properties of sinus and atrioventricular nodes. Regarding the extracardiac nerve system, the role of stellate ganglion in mediating differential regional electrophysiological effects on sinus, atrioventricular node, and myocardium is clinically relevant and would be a nice addition to Part I as well. Part II is an excellent review of stress hormones and their effects on the heart. This chapter is a timely update on the complexity of physiological actions of stress hormones beyond ACTH. Cardiac pain is a subject of Part III, in which a detailed review of cardiac nociceptive system anatomy,pathophysioligy, clinical syndromes, and new insights into syndrome X is provided. The angiotensinogen II and vasopressin relationship and the role of angiotensinogen II receptor subtypes in the release of vasopressin are reviewed in a Part IV. Multi-level actions of renin-angiotensin system at peripheral and CNS levels in the regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis are described in Part IV as well. The role of mediators of inflammation in atherogenesis is also discussed. The relationship of neuropsychiatric disorders and cardiac disease and the association of depression with increased cardiovascular mortality are very interesting clinical topics and are well covered in the last chapter. This is a very timely and successful attempt to synthesize a huge amount of new information regarding complex neurocardiac interactions in one book. The clinical usefulness of this book would be enhanced by including a chapter on neural effects on cardiac arrhythmias as well as on important clinical syndromes, like long QT syndrome, carotid sinus syndrome, and neurocardiogenic syncope, which hopefully we will find in the next edition.
Booknews
There are physiological bases for associations of the heart with emotions, and with the apparently universal increased mortality in winter. Thirteen contributions integrate expertise in cardiology and neuroscience in overviewing the latest knowledge about head-heart interactions. The first five chapters explain autonomic control of cardiovascular functions, the neural supply of the heart, and neuropathology. Part II examines the effects of stress on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal system and the heart. Part III treats the neurobiology and neuroimaging of cardiac pain. Next, humoral factors in cardiovascular regulation and as mediators of inflammation in coronary artery disease are considered. Finally, the relationship between heart disease and cognitive/neuropsychiatric disorders is discussed. Includes photomicrographs, schematic drawings, and nice large print. The editor is with the U. of Groningen, The Netherlands. Contributors hail from the US, The Netherlands, Scandinavia, the UK, and Australia. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

3 Stars from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780896036932
  • Publisher: Springer-Verlag New York, LLC
  • Publication date: 12/29/1999
  • Edition description: 2000
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 564
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.44 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword v
Preface vii
Contributors xv
Part I Autonomic Control
1 Nerve Supply of the Heart 3
2 Emotions and Heart-Activity Control: Neurocircuitries and Pathway Interactions 55
3 Circadian Organization of the Autonomic Nervous Syste 117
4 Neuropathology and Cardiovascular Regulation: Fundamental Aspects 159
5 Neuropathology and Cardiovascular Regulation: Clinical Aspects 181
Part II The Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenal System and the Heart
6 Stress, the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenal System, and the Heart 241
Part III Heart Pain
7 Cardiac Nociceptive Systems 267
8 The Neuroanatomy of Cardiac Nociceptive Pathways: Differential Representations of "Deep" and "Superficial" Pain 303
9 Neurophysiology of Heart Pain 343
10 Neuroimaging of Heart Pain 365
Part IV Humoral Factors
11 The Central Renin-Angiotensin System in Cardiovascular Regulation 415
12 Mediators of Inflammation in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease 467
Part V Heart Disease and Brain Dysfunction
13 Heart Disease and Cognitive/Neuropsychiatric Disorders 491
Index 547
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