Nesting: Tales of Love, Life, and Real Estate

Overview


A place to call home...few ideas conjure up such a heartfelt sense of contentment, security, and simple happiness. As bestselling author Lois Wyse reminds us, each time we move, we set about finding a home for our hearts -- and therein lies the true art of nesting.

And so we turn to this delightful celebration of adorable honeymoon cottages, rotten first apartments, houses to remember (and forget), mortgaged mansions -- and that warm place in the heart we call home. With her ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (45) from $1.99   
  • New (4) from $3.95   
  • Used (41) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$3.95
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(282)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1999 Hard cover First edition. Illustrated. New in new dust jacket. Clean and tight-unused copy-Excellent! ! Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 192 p. Contains: Illustrations. ... Audience: General/trade. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Wauwatosa, WI

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$12.99
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(60)

Condition: New
New York 10/1999 Hard cover First Edition, First printing New in mylar cover. Mylar cover may show some rub wear. 192 p.; 0.66" x 7.34" x 6.67". == 130 ==

Ships from: Greenwood, IN

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$19.98
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(294)

Condition: New
068484494X New item in stock, may show minimal wear from storage. I ship daily. 100% Money Back Guarantee!

Ships from: FORT MYERS, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$29.51
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(345)

Condition: New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview


A place to call home...few ideas conjure up such a heartfelt sense of contentment, security, and simple happiness. As bestselling author Lois Wyse reminds us, each time we move, we set about finding a home for our hearts -- and therein lies the true art of nesting.

And so we turn to this delightful celebration of adorable honeymoon cottages, rotten first apartments, houses to remember (and forget), mortgaged mansions -- and that warm place in the heart we call home. With her trademark humor and insight, Lois Wyse has written a moving collection of stories, anecdotes, and poems that reminds us of the life lessons we learn as we repaint, refurnish, and redecorate in search of a place to settle down. Here are all the paths to our dream houses...and to the lives and loves we make there. It's been said that no woman ever met a man or a house she couldn't make over, but this wise little book shows us that what we are really making over is ourselves.

With short and sweet stories exploring both the emotional importance of home and the practical dramas of houses -- their quaint charms and their mysterious plumbing -- Nesting helps each of us remember that, after all, there's no place like home.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
A collection of vignettes, essays, and poetry organized around a central theme: Home is where the schmaltz is.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780684844947
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster
  • Publication date: 10/5/1999
  • Edition description: GIFT
  • Pages: 192
  • Product dimensions: 6.67 (w) x 7.34 (h) x 0.66 (d)

Meet the Author


Lois Wyse has published more than sixty books, including Women Make the Best Friends and the New York Times best-seller Funny, You Don't Look Like a Grandmother. She has been a long-time contributing editor at Good Housekeeping and writes a syndicated weekly advice column called "Wyse Words," which appears in newspapers across the country and on the Internet. The president and co-founder of Wyse Advertising, she lives in New York City and East Hampton, New York.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

From Chapter Two: Of Honeymoon Cottages, Rotten First Apartments, Mortgaged Mansions, and That Secret Place in the Heart We Cal HomeAll The Houses in the World

The first day Morgan apologized. "It never rains here," he began. "I don't understand this."

"Your cook said it's been like this for three days," the widow replied and then added, with just a hint of provocation in her voice, "But we're not really here to check the weather." She gave him her most beguiling smile.

"No, you're right. Weather be damned. Besides, I'm going to be on the phone with the office, so it's a good thing you've brought some books."

She nodded and went to her room. So much for her first attempt at a romantic response. She wondered what her three-year-old granddaughter was doing at this moment. If she were at home, she'd have the little girl with her because it was Saturday. But perhaps his concentration on business was just his style; maybe it had nothing to do with her. She'd try harder. When she came to dinner, she was wearing a long red caftan; her hair was pulled back, and she was wearing long earrings.

"You are so beautiful," he said. "Thank you for coming."

She smiled demurely.

"How did you spend your afternoon?" he asked.

"I did something I've been meaning to do. I finally had the time to begin reading the new Roosevelt biography. There were some things in it I'd never realized about -- "

"Just a minute, dear," he said. "I think there's a fax coming through."

The widow looked around the pretty dining room and realized she had no one to talk to.


At the end of the second day, another wet day he spent on the telephone with his broker and at his fax machine, she realized for the first time in many years that she felt lonely. By herself in her apartment she'd always sensed the presence of friends and family. Here she was isolated with a man wedded to his business and the people who worked for him.

At dinner the third evening he had his finest champagne served, raised his glass, and asked, "Now are you ready to make this your life?"

"You are such a fine man," she began as she raised her glass. "I wish I could say yes to you, but -- "

"Look at all I can give you," he interrupted. He looked closely at her. "I think we're compatible. We share the same values. I'm as devoted to worthwhile causes as you are." Now he set his glass down and put his hands on the table, the gesture he always made before announcing his best offer. "I'll give you thousands of dollars every month just for a clothing allowance."

She smiled sweetly. "That sounds like clamshells to me. I can't even translate that into how many dresses it would buy."

Now he pressed his hands into the table. "You can have all the money you want for charity. You'll have four houses, more if you want."

She shook her head. "Morgan, sitting in that little cottage, pretty as it is, made me realize that I felt very lonely. You have your computers and companies, but I want more than reading alone in a lovely place. Besides, loneliness isn't about being alone; it's about feeling alone."

She stood and walked around the table to where he sat. She kissed him gently on the cheek. "I'm going to leave tomorrow."


When Morgan returned to the city, he asked his second son for a list of eligible women, and three months later he announced his engagement to the widowed mother of one of his daughters-in-law.

Said the widow who spurned him, "I wish only the best for him, and I do hope his new wife will like me. He is a wonderful, generous man, even though he couldn't understand my decision. But you see, when a woman's been alone as I have, has learned to make a life for herself, likes nothing better than good conversation with bright and interesting people, how can she exchange it all for a rich man with a fax machine in all the houses in the world?"

Love is about the number
of hours, not the number of
houses, a man will share.


A Scene of Changes

She changed her name to Fred the morning of her thirty-fifth birthday. "I need to do something different," she explained when she phoned her best friend, Victoria. "I am getting nowhere with Mary. Frederica is my middle name, so why not use it? That name has just been sitting around on my birth certificate. It's time to try it on for size, and as long as I'm just trying, why not see if I can change my luck with a man's name?"

"The name is not the game," Victoria answered.

"But the only players in the game are named Fred or Joe or Bill. How many straight men who want to be married are still single at thirty-five? My biological clock is on eastern standard time and my life is three hours behind on Pacific time. At this rate I will never get married or have a baby."

"Is that so bad?" Victoria wondered.

"Maybe not for you," the newly minted Fred answered. "But I've got my body in pretty good shape for someone who lives on yogurt and take-out salads. I hang out at the gym because Mimzy -- remember Mimzy? -- met her new husband on the treadmill next to hers. I put in enough miles for cross-country expertise on that damned treadmill, and the only men next to me are potbellied guys getting over heart attacks or other women's husbands who don't want to leave home. No matter where I look, the only thing I see is a million other women like me. I see them in the deli and the take-out store. I see them at my office, in the movies, and on the bus. I'm damned tired of going home at night and wondering which Seinfeld episode they'll replay tonight."

"Maybe if you fixed up your apartment, you'd feel better," Victoria advised.

"That's what I said before I fixed up myself," Fred answered. "But if a new body didn't bring the boys around, why will a new sofa?"

"Because," Victoria took a deep breath and paused. "Well, I honestly don't know, but you have to go home and look at something besides old cheese in the fridge and those four green walls."

"You think I'll feel better if I throw away the cheese?" Fred laughed.

"Not necessarily. But maybe if you get rid of those green walls -- "

"I don't know why I'm listening to you. You're not any more married than I am. But I'm ready to try anything. So you're telling me guys don't like green walls...."

Copyright © 1999 by Garrett Press, Inc.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Contents

Foreword

I.Memories Are Made of This

Where?s Robbie?

Moving On

New and Strange Streets

Count by Number

Spring Cleaning

Ghost in the Attic

Moving Thoughts

II.Of Honeymoon Cottages, Rotten First Apartments, Mortgaged Mansions, and That Secret Place in the Heart We Call Home

The Music of My Heart

Monsters and Moguls

The Most Beautiful House in the World

In the Beginning

Short Play

A Man?s Story

Lighting the Way

Waves of Happiness

Just a House

Tiffany at Home

Destiny

All the Houses in the World

A Scene of Changes

The Way We Are

III. At Long Last Home

Going Home

Whatever Lola Wants...

A Moving Experience

Come See My House

That Old Glow

The Christmas Tree

A Movable Feast

Off the Beaten Path

Coming Home

Afterword

Acknowledgments

Read More Show Less

Foreword

Foreword

Who doesn't remember the start of it all, the days when we played house with a best friend, tested the waters, and tried to decide what life would be like when we made the rules?

It's a long road from playhouse to real house but, although few of us realized at the moment, our early make-believe was preparing us for the days of our nesting, the time when we would create a home of our own. In our first recollections home meant the place we'd find someone reaching out with open arms offering kisses to cure the bad and reward the good.

In our childhood homes we learned to make beds and memories, set tables, establish values, and practice ways to tame the wolves waiting outside our doors. For many of us, home always remains that first family address, and it is inextricably tied into feelings for mother, daddy, grandparents, caretakers, and siblings. Memories of home, no matter when we left, are always right under the surface, so that some disconnected event may suddenly propel us back into a long-forgotten place.

A sudden whiff of bread baking -- or was that toast burning? -- can erase the years and put us back in the first kitchen we remember. The sight of a single rose can make a garden of memory bloom. A cricket's chirp, an automobile horn, or a song on the radio let us live another life again. Just seeing a little girl in a plaid skirt, a boy hugging his dog, even hopscotch blocks chalked on a city street can conjure up a collage with images of home.

Like an involuntary reflex, the train of memory propels us from the present back into a half-remembered past. A familiar pull on the heartstrings, a rush of random emotions, and in a split second we are led back into the old familiar safety of the nest.

Inevitably those first memories become a part of our consciousness and subconscious and figure in our decisions, both positive and negative, about our own homes ("All I ever want is a flowered bedroom" or "I'll never have a flowered bedroom like the one I had"). Perhaps the reason each early nest echoes in some ways the one from which we flew is that the heart does not leave home with ease. It is hard to move on and move out, hard to know what will finally make us feel that our nest-in-waiting is indeed home. For many of us home won't be home until there's a spouse. For others a spouse isn't enough; there has to be a child, too. For a few it will be an absence of other people, rather than a presence, that makes a place feel like one's own. And for some it's home the day a dog or cat or goldfish moves in.


Some of us will never stop looking. Armed with recollections and hopes, we will go through life opening doors and looking for a place to call home, pausing first to get the beat of the place. Does this room talk to me? Can I imagine us here on a Sunday afternoon? Is this just another house or, wonder of wonders, does it feel like home, a sanctuary where dreams can be parked and fears hidden, a refuge where each of us can find the quiet time to heal both head and heart while coping with what is supposed to be real life?

We won't all love the same houses any more than we all love the same people. We don't all look at home through the same telescope. One family's treasure goes into another's garage sale. But it is from treasures and not-quite treasures that we build and scrape to put together those bits and pieces of ourselves that make our nests.


This is a book about those nests we call home, the changes we make to find them, and the reasons we make them. We may repaint a house here or add a closet there, but in the world where ideas are traded, careers switched, and loves ended, what we are really making over is ourselves.

Each movement, each subtle alteration offers a lesson of life. While this is a book of stories, it is also a book about the lessons we learn as we go about finding a home for the heart, which is, after all, the true art of nesting.

Copyright © 1999 by Garrett Press, Inc.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)