.NET Web Services: Architecture and Implementation

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Overview

Praise for .NET Web Services

“Keith Ballinger has been ‘Mr. Web Services’ at Microsoft for as long as there were Web services. Anyone doing work on the Microsoft Web Services platform would do themselves a favor by reading this book, as Keith’s insights are unique.”

Bob Beauchemin, DevelopMentor

“This book is a very good introduction to Web services, providing enough specific information for a person to fully understand the principles and implementation issues of Web services . . . Ballinger clearly outlines the fundamental architectural topics that any organization looking to implement XML Web services should consider.”

Colin Bowern, Consultant, Microsoft Corporation

“This book provides information about all principal components of Webservices: transport protocol, interface definition and services discovery mechanisms, security and messaging infrastructure, as well as underlying technologies (XML, TCP/IP, HTTP). Description of each subject is comprehensive and complete; examples provide good illustration from the content.”

Max Loukianov, Solomio Corp.

.NET Web Services is the authoritative guide to designing and architecting better Web services using Microsoft technologies. Written by Keith Ballinger, a Program Manager for XML Web Services at Microsoft, this book explains what Web services are, why they exist, and how they work in .NET. Readers will gain a thorough understanding of the technologies that allows them to take full advantage of .NET.

The book opens with an introduction to Web services and Web services standards. It then explores .NET technologies and examines how the .NET Framework gives developers the tools they need to build Web service applications. The core of the book focuses on the key specifications that make up the Web services architecture, from HTTP to SOAP to WS-Security. .NET Web Services concludes with the author's expert advice on architecting and designing Web service applications.

Topics covered include:

  • The features and pitfalls of Web services
  • Web services standards
  • Creating Web Services with ASP.NET
  • Creating Web service clients
  • XML serialization with .NET
  • Extending Web services
  • Transport protocols for Web services
  • XML and XML Schemas
  • SOAP
  • Describing Web services
  • Discovering Web services
  • Messaging with Web services
  • Securing Web services
  • Advanced messaging

Best practices are illustrated throughout with full working examples as well as code samples using C# and ASP.NET Web services. A companion Web site at www.keithba.net includes all sample code from the book.

Books in the Microsoft .NET Development Series are written and reviewed by the principal authorities and pioneering developers of the Microsoft .NET technologies, including the Microsoft .NET development team and DevelopMentor. Books in the Microsoft .NET Development Series focus on the design, architecture, and implementation of the Microsoft .NET initiative to empower developers and students everywhere with the knowledge they need to thrive in the Microsoft .NET revolution.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
If you’re building web services, you owe it to yourself to take a good look at .NET’s capabilities. This concise book is a quick, easy way to understand Microsoft’s impressive work.

Keith Ballinger guides you through virtually every facet of web services development in .NET. You’ll start by creating simple web services in ASP.NET, then learn how to create clients in three ways: with the .NET Framework SDK; using Visual Studio .NET (briefly); or “by hand.” The latter is crucial, because you’ll sometimes need to seriously modify the client class .NET generates for you.

Next, there’s detailed coverage of XML serialization, .NET’s convenient, “class-friendly” technology for manipulating XML content. You’ll find coverage of SOAP messaging and extensions; transport via HTTP, TCP, and even SMTP; data formats, schemas, and namespaces; describing web services with WSDL; and discovering them with UDDI.

As Ballinger observes, web services aren’t just about remote method calls: their true value lies in long-running business transactions that utilize asynchronous messages that don’t require an immediate reply. To make this work, you need to handle multiple transports and nodes seamlessly -- and that means mastering standards like WS-Routing, WS-Referral, WS-Security, and DIME. As program manager for Web Services Enhancements for Microsoft .NET, Ballinger has been at the heart of Microsoft’s work in these areas, and he introduces them well.

The book concludes with an overview of several “advanced” message reliability features users often request, and guidance on designing web services for interoperability or performance. Useful, practical, and very accessible. Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks for Dummies, Second Edition.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Keith Ballinger is the Program Manager for the Web Services Enhancements for Microsoft .NET at Microsoft. He was a key contributor to several features in the .NET Framework and Visual Studio .NET, including ASP.NET Web services. Keith is coauthor of the Web Services Inspection Language specification, and he regularly speaks at a variety of conferences, including Microsoft Tech Ed, the XML Conference & Exposition, and the Microsoft Professional Developers Conference. He is also coauthor of Special Edition: Using Active Server Pages™ (Que, 1998).

0321113594AB01162003

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Read an Excerpt

This book is the result of several years of work. Not just my personal work (although writing this book has involved some late nights), but also the hard work and many person years of effort by Microsoft's .NET Framework and

But this begs the questions: Why have so many people and so much money been poured into this technology? Why do Microsoft and many others perceive Web services as a huge and potentially industry-changing piece of work? This book can't possibly give a complete answer, but in it I've tried to deliver the most important pieces of information I can about Web services, specifically those built with .NET. In doing so, I hope that you, too, can see how wonderful this technology is.

Most books on Web services have focused on specific technologies and how to use class libraries to build Web services and clients. Some of the better ones have attempted to give an overview of SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol), WSDL (Web Services Description Language), and other technologies. What are Web services? Why do they exist? Again, I can't answer those questions completely, but I can help interested individuals better understand the technology in general, and thereby design and architect better Web services. I've tried to present the material in a way that makes obvious the reasons for their existence.

Of course, as the program manager for Web services built with Microsoft's .NET Framework, I feel compelled to show off a little. I truly feel that I have helped to build the best Web services technology around, and that it's appropriate for me to take you through the major features of this technology. Most of the code listings also use C# and ASP.NET Web Services.

I designed this book to be read either from front to back, or randomly. Although each chapter builds on previous chapters, most chapters can be read alone and still be useful. This book consists of 15 chapters:

  • Chapters 1 and 2 explain what Web services are and the standards that make up the Web services world.
  • Chapters 3 through 6 are an in-depth view of how the .NET Framework enables developers to build Web service applications.
  • Chapters 7 through 14 take a step back and drill into the specifications (from HTTP, to SOAP, to WS-Security) that make up the Web service architecture.
  • Chapter 15 delivers a few words of advice about architecting and designing Web service applications.

—Keith Ballinger

0321113594P01272003

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Table of Contents

Foreword.

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

1. Introducing Web Services.

The Problem: Sharing Data.

The Solution: Distributed Application Development.

The Web Architecture.

Defining Web Services.

The Significance of Internet Standards.

The Significance of WSDL.

The Significance of Interoperability.

The Significance of Loose Coupling.

Modular Design.

Message Passing.

Error Handling.

The Web Service Architecture.

The Baseline Specifications of Web Service Architecture.

Summary.

2. XMLWeb Services Standards.

The Basics.

HTTP.

XML and XML Schema.

Standards for XMLWeb Services.

The Protocol: SOAP.

Describing Services with WSDL.

Discovering Services with UDDI.

Other Protocols.

Summary.

3. Creating Web Services with ASP.NET.

Roadmap to ASP.NET Web Services.

Building Servers.

Anatomy of a Web Service.

Building Document-Literal Services.

Building Document-Encoded Services.

Building RPC-Encoded Services.

Building One-Way Services.

Controlling Routing.

Using SOAP Bindings.

Implementing a Server Asynchronously.

Using SOAP Headers.

Returning Errors.

Summary.

4. Creating Web Service Clients.

Creating Clients with the .NET Framework SDK.

Discovery with disco.exe.

WSDL Consumption.

Creating Clients with Visual Studio .NET.

Creating Web Service Clients Manually.

Building Document-Literal Clients.

Building Document-Encoded Clients.

Building RPC-Encoded Clients.

Building One-Way Clients.

Building a Client That Includes Asynchronous Methods.

Handling Errors and SOAP Faults.

Extending and Customizing a Client.

Summary.

5. XML Serialization with .NET.

Overview.

Only Classes with a Public, Default Constructor Will Be Serialized.

Only Public Fields and Properties Will Be Serialized.

Read-Only Fields and Properties Will Not Be Serialized.

Methods and Other Type Information Will Not Be Serialized.

Writing and Reading XML.

Serializing Encoded XML.

Customizing XML Serialization.

The Namespace of Serialized XMLWill Be http://tempuri.org by Default.

Properties and Fields Will Remain in the Same Namespace.

Properties and Fields Will Be Serialized as Elements.

Arrays with XML Serialization.

Serializing Untyped XML.

Creating Classes from Schemas.

XML Serialization and Web Services.

Summary.

6. Extending Web Services.

Soap Extensions.

Description Formatters.

Customizing Transport Information.

Setting Exposed HTTP Properties.

Overriding Proxy Class Behavior.

HTTP Modules.

The Web Services Enhancements for Microsoft .NET.

Summary.

7. Transport Protocols for Web Services.

TCP Communication.

Unreliable Messages with UDP.

SOAP in E-mail: SMTP.

The Web's Transport: HTTP.

The WebClient Class.

The WebRequest Classes.

Summary.

8. Data and Format: XML and XML Schemas.

The Meta-Language.

XML Documents and Namespaces.

Programming with XML and Namespaces.

Streaming XML Processing.

DOM-Based Programming.

Describing XML with Schemas.

Data Types with XML Schema.

Describing the XML Shape.

Programming with Schemas.

Programming Schema-Based XML.

Manipulating XML Schema Documents.

Summary.

9. The Messaging Protocol: SOAP.

Overview of the SOAP Protocol.

Enveloping with SOAP.

Errors with SOAP.

Remote Method Calls with SOAP.

SOAP and HTTP.

Using SOAP to Send Messages.

SOAP Headers and Asynchronous Messaging

Summary.

10. Describing Web Services.

Requirements for Describing Web Services.

The Web Services Description Language.

Extensibility.

Abstraction.

Structure.

Anatomy of WSDL.

Abstract Message Operations.

Concrete Operation Information.

Types.

Messages.

Port Types and Operations.

Bindings.

Services and Ports.

Writing WSDL.

Reading WSDL Documents with .NET.

Extending WSDL.

Web Service Policy.

Summary.

11. Discovering Web Services.

Universal Discovery with UDDI.

The Anatomy of UDDI.

Programmer's API.

WSDL and UDDI.

WS-Inspection.

Anatomy of WS-Inspection.

Ad-Hoc Discovery.

Summary.

12. Messaging with Web Services: WS-Routing, WS-Referral, and DIME.

Logical Names.

Routing Messages.

Message Paths with WS-Routing.

Building WS-Routing Applications.

Dynamic Configuration of SOAP Routers.

DIME.

Anatomy of a DIME Message.

Using DIME with SOAP.

Summary.

13. Securing Web Services with WS-Security.

Security Technologies and Standards.

Authentication.

Confidentiality.

Integrity.

Web Service Security Protocols.

Definitions.

WS-Security.

Summary.

14. Advanced Messaging: Reliability and Sessions.

Sessions.

HTTP Sessions.

Message-Level Sessions.

Message Reliability.

Dialogues and Monologues.

Summary.

15. Designing Web Services.

Performance.

Writing Performance-Oriented Code with .NET.

Message Size and Network Latency.

How Important Is Performance?

Interoperability.

Audience-Centered Design.

Specific SOAP Issues.

Versioning.

Types of Versioning.

Loosely Coupled Architecture and Implementation Versioning.

Namespaces and Versioning.

Using Business Logic.

Caching.

Summary.

Final Thoughts.

Index. 0321113594T01272003

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Preface

This book is the result of several years of work. Not just my personal work (although writing this book has involved some late nights), but also the hard work and many person years of effort by Microsoft's .NET Framework and XML messaging teams. Several other companies and talented individuals, such as Sam Ruby from IBM, have also been critical in taking this technology to the public.

But this begs the questions: Why have so many people and so much money been poured into this technology? Why do Microsoft and many others perceive Web services as a huge and potentially industry-changing piece of work? This book can't possibly give a complete answer, but in it I've tried to deliver the most important pieces of information I can about Web services, specifically those built with .NET. In doing so, I hope that you, too, can see how wonderful this technology is.

Most books on Web services have focused on specific technologies and how to use class libraries to build Web services and clients. Some of the better ones have attempted to give an overview of SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol), WSDL (Web Services Description Language), and other technologies. What are Web services? Why do they exist? Again, I can't answer those questions completely, but I can help interested individuals better understand the technology in general, and thereby design and architect better Web services. I've tried to present the material in a way that makes obvious the reasons for their existence.

Of course, as the program manager for Web services built with Microsoft's .NET Framework, I feel compelled to show off a little. I truly feel that I have helped to build the best Web services technology around, and that it's appropriate for me to take you through the major features of this technology. Most of the code listings also use C# and ASP.NET Web Services.

I designed this book to be read either from front to back, or randomly. Although each chapter builds on previous chapters, most chapters can be read alone and still be useful. This book consists of 15 chapters:

  • Chapters 1 and 2 explain what Web services are and the standards that make up the Web services world.
  • Chapters 3 through 6 are an in-depth view of how the .NET Framework enables developers to build Web service applications.
  • Chapters 7 through 14 take a step back and drill into the specifications (from HTTP, to SOAP, to WS-Security) that make up the Web service architecture.
  • Chapter 15 delivers a few words of advice about architecting and designing Web service applications.

--Keith Ballinger

0321113594P01272003

Read More Show Less

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