Network Application Frameworks: Design and Architecture / Edition 1

Network Application Frameworks: Design and Architecture / Edition 1

by Eric Greenberg
     
 

ISBN-10: 0201309505

ISBN-13: 9780201309508

Pub. Date: 12/04/1998

Publisher: Addison-Wesley

As legacy systems continue to serve as the backbone for corporations, network engineers, IS managers, and architects face an enormous challenge - how to integrate modern networking platforms and applications with legacy systems to create a single computing environment that efficiently, effectively, and securely serves the organization's needs.

At last, with

Overview

As legacy systems continue to serve as the backbone for corporations, network engineers, IS managers, and architects face an enormous challenge - how to integrate modern networking platforms and applications with legacy systems to create a single computing environment that efficiently, effectively, and securely serves the organization's needs.

At last, with this comprehensive book by a pioneer in the networking and application development field, there is one single guide to this formidable task. A complete overview of major networking technologies and application development components is provided. And rather than just summarizing how various technologies work, the author provides deeper insight into enterprise-wide design, performance, security, reliability, and operational implications.

Network engineers will more easily isolate problems to the network, the application, or both. IS Managers will save invaluable time and resources by better identifying optimal integration strategies and existing trouble spots. Software managers will design more seamless maintainable applications. Architects will find a wealth of information needed to plan the future. Networks and their applications will be designed together rather than in isolation, producing a far better user experience while reducing cost and improving managability. Topics covered include:

  • TCP/IP, IP routing, OSPF, BGPv4, IGRP/EIGRP, IPv6 and IPv4
  • Security: Kerberos, public key cryptography, X.509 certificates and certificate authorities, SSL, IPSEC, and SASL.
  • Objects: CORBA, Microsoft COM/DCOM, and Microsoft Transaction Server (MTS)
  • Directory Services: Windows NT 4, NT 5 Active Directory, NDS, LDAP, and X.500
  • Microsoft's key technologies and architectures, including WOSA, SPI, WinSock, ADO, UDA, ODBC, MAPI, and mainframe integration Novell NetWare protocols, networking techniques, SAP and the bindery, NDS, TCP/IP integration, and interoperability for versions 3.x through 5.
  • IBM technologies, including SNA, SDLC, CICS, Token Ring legacy integration, and IBM mainframe integration with web technologies and TCP/IP
  • Open Group DCE and RPC

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780201309508
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley
Publication date:
12/04/1998
Pages:
416
Product dimensions:
7.54(w) x 9.50(h) x 0.96(d)

Table of Contents

Preface xvii(1)
Can We Really Cover All That? xviii(2)
Book Organization xx(7)
Acknowledgments and Reflections xxvii
Chapter 1 What Is a Network Application Framework?
1(26)
1.1 Introduction
1(1)
1.2 Object Technology and Distributed Objects
2(6)
1.2.1 The Study of Object-Oriented Concepts and Component Models
3(1)
1.2.2 Categories of Object Technology
4(1)
1.2.3 Object Terminology and Concepts
5(3)
1.3 Directory Services
8(6)
1.3.1 Characteristics of Directory Services
10(3)
1.3.2 Directory Services and the Network
13(1)
1.4 Transaction Services
14(4)
1.5 Security Services
18(1)
1.6 Networking Services
19(4)
1.6.1 Retransmission and Flow Control
21(1)
1.6.2 Byte Overhead
21(1)
1.6.3 Character Echo
22(1)
1.6.4 Packet Size and Queuing
22(1)
1.7 Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) and Development Platform Services
23(1)
1.8 File- and Printer-Sharing Services
24(1)
1.9 Conclusions
24(3)
Chapter 2 Core Network Application Framework Technologies
27(60)
2.1 Introduction
29(1)
2.2 Core Security Technologies
30(18)
2.2.1 Public Key Cryptography
32(12)
2.2.2 Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS) Protocols
44(7)
2.2.3 IP-Level Security (IPSEC)
51(1)
2.2.4 Kerberos
52(6)
2.3 Remote Procedure Call (RPC)
58(5)
2.3.1 Application Development Concerns
60(1)
2.3.2 Standard RPC Implementations
60(1)
2.3.3 Data Representation
61(1)
2.3.4 Transactional RPC (TxRPC)
61(1)
2.3.5 Security
62(1)
2.3.6 API Programming
63(1)
2.4 Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA): Awakening of the Object Web
63(10)
2.4.1 Introduction to CORBA
63(1)
2.4.2 Interfaces: Standardizing Information Passing Between Objects
64(1)
2.4.3 Hop on the Object Bus: The Object Request Broker (ORB)
65(1)
2.4.4 Static Versus Dynamic Object Discovery
66(2)
2.4.5 Distributed Object Communication: Inter-ORB Standards and IIOP
68(1)
2.4.6 CORBA Value-Added Services
69(4)
2.4.7 CORBA Versus RPC
73(1)
2.5 X.500 and Lightweight Directory Access Protocol Version 3 (LDAPv3)
73(11)
2.5.1 X.500
74(6)
2.5.2 LDAPv3
80(4)
2.6 Conclusions
84(3)
Chapter 3 The TCP/IP Protocol Suite
87(34)
3.1 Introduction
89(1)
3.2 IP, TCP, and UDP
89(13)
3.2.1 IP in Detail
90(6)
3.2.2 TCP in Detail
96(4)
3.2.3 UDP in Detail
100(2)
3.3 Application Design
102(1)
3.4 TCP and UDP Security and WAN Efficiency
103(5)
3.5 Protocol Security: A Closer Look
108(3)
3.5.1 Tapping and Sniffing
109(1)
3.5.2 TFTP and Security
109(1)
3.5.3 BOOTP/DHCP and Security
109(1)
3.5.4 DNS and Security
110(1)
3.5.5 SNMP and Security
110(1)
3.6 Efficiency: A Closer Look
111(3)
3.6.1 TELNET and Efficiency
111(1)
3.6.2 X-Terminal and Efficiency
112(1)
3.6.3 TFTP and Efficiency
113(1)
3.6.4 SNMP and Efficiency
113(1)
3.7 The World of Internet Addressing
114(4)
3.7.1 Subnet Masks: Organizing Your Network Address Space
116(1)
3.7.2 Variable-Length Subnet Masks (VLSM): Conserving Your Address Space
117(1)
3.8 Conclusions
118(3)
Chapter 4 IP Routing
121(50)
4.1 Introduction
123(1)
4.2 The Autonomous System (AS): Keeping Things Separate
124(2)
4.3 Fundamental Routing Characteristics
126(1)
4.4 Address Resolution Protocol (ARP)
126(2)
4.4.1 ARP Example
126(2)
4.5 Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) for IPv4
128(2)
4.6 IP Routing Protocols
130(38)
4.6.1 Routing Information Protocol Version 1 (RIPv1)
130(8)
4.6.2 Routing Information Protocol Version 2 (RIPv2)
138(1)
4.6.3 Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) Protocol
139(12)
4.6.4 Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (IGRP) and Enhanced Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP)
151(4)
4.6.5 Border Gateway Protocol 4 (BGP-4)
155(13)
4.7 Conclusions
168(3)
Chapter 5 Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6)
171(16)
5.1 Introduction
172(1)
5.2 Datagram Header Format and Options
173(5)
5.2.1 The Minimum IPv6 Header
174(3)
5.2.2 Extension Headers
177(1)
5.3 Addressing
178(4)
5.3.1 Hexadecimal Representation
178(2)
5.3.2 Structure and Assignment
180(2)
5.4 Autoconfiguration
182(1)
5.5 Address Resolution
183(1)
5.6 Impact on Applications
183(1)
5.7 IPv4/IPv6 Migration and Interoperability
183(1)
5.8 Conclusions
184(3)
Chapter 6 The Open Group Distributed Computing Environment (DCE)
187(16)
6.1 Introduction
188(1)
6.2 DCE: Not Necessarily an Operating System
189(1)
6.3 DCE Security Service
190(2)
6.3.1 Tickets and PACs
191(1)
6.3.2 Security Database
192(1)
6.3.3 Security API
192(1)
6.4 DCE Directory Service
192(2)
6.5 DCE File Service (DFS)
194(3)
6.6 DCE Time Service (DTS)
197(1)
6.7 DCE Threads
197(2)
6.7.1 A Platform-Independent API
197(1)
6.7.2 Threads Application Development
198(1)
6.8 DCE and CORBA
199(1)
6.9 DCE Interoperability
199(1)
6.10 Conclusions
200(3)
Chapter 7 Microsoft and WOSA
203(44)
7.1 Introduction
204(4)
7.1.1 Vision
204(1)
7.1.2 Components of the Microsoft Network Application Framework
205(3)
7.2 Service Provider Interface (SPI) Architecture
208(1)
7.3 Multitasking, Synchronization, and Threads
209(1)
7.4 Local Interprocess Communication
210(1)
7.5 Networking
210(6)
7.5.1 Transports
210(1)
7.5.2 Remote Interprocess Communication
211(1)
7.5.3 WNet() APIs
212(1)
7.5.4 NetBIOS
212(1)
7.5.5 Berkeley (BSD) Sockets and Windows Sockets Specification (WinSock)
213(3)
7.6 Open Database Connectivity (ODBC)
216(2)
7.7 Messaging API (MAPI)
218(3)
7.7.1 Simple Microsoft Messaging API (MAPI)
220(1)
7.7.2 Common Messaging Call (CMC)
220(1)
7.7.3 Extended MAPI
220(1)
7.8 Telephony API (TAPI)
221(1)
7.9 Microsoft Distributed Object Framework
222(11)
7.9.1 Evolution of COM: The Art of All That Is "X"
222(3)
7.9.2 COM Wrapping: Microsoft Interface Definition Language (MIDL)
225(1)
7.9.3 COM: A Binary Standard
226(1)
7.9.4 ActiveX Security
227(2)
7.9.5 Containers
229(1)
7.9.6 COM, Clustering, and Middleware
230(1)
7.9.7 Microsoft Message Queue Server (MSMQ)
231(1)
7.9.8 Distributed COM (DCOM): COM with a Longer Wire
232(1)
7.9.9 COM+
233(1)
7.10 Microsoft Transaction Server (MTS): Managing Objects in the Enterprise
233(5)
7.10.1 MTS Services and Architecture
233(2)
7.10.2 MTS and Object Pooling
235(1)
7.10.3 MTS and Object Creationism
236(1)
7.10.4 MTS and Object Security
237(1)
7.11 COM Transaction Integrator for CICS and IMS (Cedar): Intergrating with SNA/Mainframe Technology
238(1)
7.12 COM, CORBA, and JavaBeans: Friendly Fire and Interoperability
239(3)
7.12.1 COM Versus Java RMI Versus CORBA
240(1)
7.12.2 COM/CORBA Interoperability
241(1)
7.13 Universal Data Architecture (UDA), Active X Data Objects (ADO), and OLE-DB
242(1)
7.14 Internationalization
243(1)
7.15 Conclusions
243(4)
Chapter 8 The NT 4 Directory Service
247(18)
8.1 Introduction
248(1)
8.2 Directory Structure
249(3)
8.3 The Application of Groups Within Domains
252(1)
8.4 Domains in More Detail
253(1)
8.5 Domains and Groups
254(1)
8.6 Access Control Lists
254(1)
8.7 Trust Management
255(1)
8.8 Directionality of Trust and Human Relationships
255(1)
8.9 Summary of Design Rules
257(1)
8.10 Directory Service Topologies
258(3)
8.10.1 Single Domain
258(1)
8.10.2 Single Master Domain
258(2)
8.10.3 Multiple Master Domain
260(1)
8.10.4 Complete Trust
261(1)
8.11 Interoperability and Migration
261(1)
8.12 Conclusions
262(3)
Chapter 9 NT 5 Active Directory Services
265(12)
9.1 Introduction
266(1)
9.2 Standards Supported
266(2)
9.2.1 DNS
266(1)
9.2.2 Kerberos and SSPI
267(1)
9.2.3 X.500
268(1)
9.2.4 ADSI, LDAP, and MAPI
268(1)
9.3 Directory Structure
268(1)
9.4 Objects, Users, Groups, Resources, and OUs
269(1)
9.5 Naming, Domains, and Trees
270(1)
9.6 Kerberos: Guarding the "Forest"
271(1)
9.7 The Global Catalogue: Make It Snappy
271(1)
9.8 Domain Controllers
272(1)
9.9 Name Interference
273(1)
9.10 Trust Management
273(1)
9.11 Interoperability and Migration
273(1)
9.12 Conclusions
274(3)
Chapter 10 Novell NetWare
277(32)
10.1 Introduction
278(1)
10.2 NetWare 3.x
279(11)
10.2.1 Core Protocols and Functions
280(1)
10.2.2 Internetwork Packet Exchange (IPX)
280(3)
10.2.3 Sequenced Packet Exchange (SPX)
283(1)
10.2.4 Service Advertisement Protocol (SAP) and the Bindery: Precursor to a Directory
284(4)
10.2.5 Routing Protocols: RIP, NLSP, and EIGRP
288(1)
10.2.6 NetWare Core Protocol (NCP)
288(1)
10.2.7 Application Development
289(1)
10.3 NetWare 4.x/IntraNetWare
290(1)
10.4 NetWare Directory Services (NDS)
290(12)
10.4.1 Containers and Leaf Objects: Organizing People, Resources, and Services
292(4)
10.4.2 Trust Management and Inherited Rights Filter (IRF)
296(1)
10.4.3 Security: Authentication and Authorization
297(1)
10.4.4 Partitions and Replicas: Designing for Reliability and Performance
298(3)
10.4.5 NDS for NT: Integrating with Microsoft NT Domains
301(1)
10.4.6 LDAP Services for NDS
302(2)
10.5 NetWare 3.x/4.x Integration with TCP/IP
302(2)
10.6 NetWare and IBM SNA Integration
304(1)
10.7 NetWare 5: The Dawn of Native TCP/IP over NetWare
305(1)
10.8 Modern Novell Application Development: Java, CORBA, and the Directory Service
305(2)
10.9 Conclusions
307(2)
Chapter 11 IBM
309(32)
11.1 Introduction
310(1)
11.2 An IBM Time Line and Computer Systems Overview
311(6)
11.2.1 The Time Line
312(2)
11.2.2 Processors and Architectures
314(1)
11.2.3 Mainframe Operating Systems and Applications
315(2)
11.2.4 Mainframe Access with Terminals
317(1)
11.3 SNA Components: Physical Units and Logical Units
317(2)
11.4 The Systems Network Architecture (SNA) Layered Model
319(3)
11.5 IBM Networking
322(2)
11.5.1 The First Networking Intelligence Assumption: The Desktop Has None
322(1)
11.5.2 Making It Dynamic: APPN
323(1)
11.5.3 Networking Media and Methods
324(10)
11.6 IBM Transaction Series Systems: The Customer Information Control System (CICS)
334(1)
11.7 Integrating CICS with the Web
335(3)
11.7.1 CICS Gateway for Java
336(1)
11.7.2 CICS Internet Gateway
337(1)
11.8 The IBM 3270 Java Emulator
338(1)
11.9 Conclusions
338(3)
Chapter 12 Design Rule Summary
341(16)
12.1 Introduction
341(1)
12.2 Tables
341(16)
Index 357

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