The Network: A Novel

The Network: A Novel

3.4 9
by Jason Elliot
     
 

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In this bold novel, Jason Elliot illuminates the dark recesses of the intelligence community during a crucial moment in history: the struggle to avoid a terrorist attack. Based on real characters and drawing on the author's extensive firsthand knowledge of Afghanistan, the novel follows ex-army officer Anthony Taverner, recruited by the British Intelligence

Overview

In this bold novel, Jason Elliot illuminates the dark recesses of the intelligence community during a crucial moment in history: the struggle to avoid a terrorist attack. Based on real characters and drawing on the author's extensive firsthand knowledge of Afghanistan, the novel follows ex-army officer Anthony Taverner, recruited by the British Intelligence Service to help destroy a cache of American Stinger missiles loose in Afghanistan-before they fall into al-Qaeda's hands. This is a thriller of rare authenticity, providing sustained insight into influences surrounding 9/11 and raising questions about the role of intelligence agencies in historical events deliberately hidden from the public eye.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781608198467
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
07/17/2012
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

Jason Elliot is a notable, prize-winning travel writer, whose works include An Unexpected Light: Travels in Afghanistan, a New York Times bestseller and winner of the Thomas Cook/Daily Telegraph Travel Book Award, and Mirrors of the Unseen: Journeys in Iran. The Network is his first novel.

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Network 3.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 9 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
headhunterIA More than 1 year ago
Would not recommend this book, I really tried to read it but could not. Almost like a narrative, very boring.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wonderful novel! The author has blended the curent affairs with fiction so well it feels like im reading an interesting real life covert op. The training part, the characters playing an equally important roles are very nicely blended and is more interesting to read. The relationship building between H and the protoganist is perfect. This novel is on par with david ignatius novels.
OregonAnthrop More than 1 year ago
I loved Elliot's AN UNEXPECTED LIGHT and consider it one of the most authentic and engaging accounts available on the "real" Afghanistan. This novel, however, makes only limited use of Elliot's knowledge and travels (in Iran as well as Afghanistan) and is not a particularly exciting or illuminating spy narrative. I struggled through it, hoping (and until the end, still believing) that Elliot's insights and wisdom would shine through. But in the end there are about 10 worthwhile pages, at most, and the rest is better done by Hollywood blockbusters.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Billjr13 More than 1 year ago
I can highly recommend Jason Elliot's new novel The Network. He has created a richly detailed novel based in reality that is truly compelling to read. It is a spy thriller that speaks with vivid description and distinctive authenticity of someone who lived there. It really has it all, seemingly authentic tradecraft, espionage, deceit, betrayals, religion, international affairs, exploitation, romance and friendships, all tested to the very limit. The Network is well written with a complex plot, plenty of suspense, wonderful depiction of locations and even a little romance. On the eve of 9/11, Former army officer and Gulf War veteran Captain Anthony Taverner is living a quiet life in the English countryside. But his intimate knowledge of Afghanistan and his knowledge of explosives haven't gone unnoticed. Taverner is recruited by the Secret Intelligence Service for a mission in Afghanistan: to infiltrate a fort in Taliban-held territory and destroy a cache of the CIA's stinger missiles before they fall into the hands of Al Qaeda. Soon he finds himself moving into secret worlds; from the tunnel complex beneath SIS HQ in London's Vauxhall Cross, to the CIA's bin Laden tracking station at Langley. At first, it seems likes a straightforward mission. But Taverner has a secret past of his own which he must conceal from even his closest allies. H, a former SAS man and security expert, is methodical, focused and supremely fit, and spends months training "Ant" in a range of 'useful' and potentially deadly skills. He will also accompany Taverner on the Op. They will destroy the fort together. But just what is the Network? What does the Baroness know about their mission? And how will all this affect history, and change the political landscape forever? As the dangerous trail leads from the pirate-haunted coast of Sudan and the company of beautiful Jameela, bin Laden's sister-in-law, to the war-torn streets of Kabul, Taverner is forced to confront the fears that belong to his most secret past.
KenCady More than 1 year ago
The Network promises much more than it delivers. We are led to believe that a former ops expert in Afghhanistan is being called out of retirement to conduct a mission that he is the only suitable person for. In the process, he faces double loyalties, both to his employer and this shadowy network that consists, mostly as we can tell, of an 86 year old lady. Promised is lots of action and ethical conflict; delivered is a detailed preparation for the op, which is not uninteresting, and then a very short tale of the op itself. The Network never plays a big part in the story, and the reader, like the operative, is left waiting in the desert- I guess for a taxi. A most unsatisfying ending for a mediocre novel.