Network Nation: Inventing American Telecommunications

Network Nation: Inventing American Telecommunications

by Richard R. John
     
 

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ISBN-10: 067402429X

ISBN-13: 9780674024298

Pub. Date: 05/01/2010

Publisher: Harvard

The telegraph and the telephone were the first electrical communications networks to become hallmarks of modernity. Yet they were not initially expected to achieve universal accessibility. In this pioneering history of their evolution, Richard R. John demonstrates how access to these networks was determined not only by technological imperatives and economic

Overview

The telegraph and the telephone were the first electrical communications networks to become hallmarks of modernity. Yet they were not initially expected to achieve universal accessibility. In this pioneering history of their evolution, Richard R. John demonstrates how access to these networks was determined not only by technological imperatives and economic incentives but also by political decision making at the federal, state, and municipal levels. In the decades between the Civil War and the First World War, Western Union and the Bell System emerged as the dominant providers for the telegraph and telephone. Both operated networks that were products not only of technology and economics but also of a distinctive political economy. Western Union arose in an antimonopolistic political economy that glorified equal rights and vilified special privilege. The Bell System flourished in a progressive political economy that idealized public utility and disparaged unnecessary waste.
The popularization of the telegraph and the telephone was opposed by business lobbies that were intent on perpetuating specialty services. In fact, it wasn’t until 1900 that the civic ideal of mass access trumped the elitist ideal of exclusivity in shaping the commercialization of the telephone. The telegraph did not become widely accessible until 1910, sixty-five years after the first fee-for-service telegraph line opened in 1845.
Network Nation places the history of telecommunications within the broader context of American politics, business, and discourse. This engrossing and provocative book persuades us of the critical role of political economy in the development of new technologies and their implementation.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780674024298
Publisher:
Harvard
Publication date:
05/01/2010
Pages:
528
Sales rank:
1,264,237
Product dimensions:
6.54(w) x 9.60(h) x 1.56(d)

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations and Tables vii

Introduction: Inventing American Telecommunications 1

1 Making a Neighborhood of a Nation 5

2 Professor Morse's Lightning 24

3 Antimonopoly 65

4 The New Postalic Dispensation 114

5 Rich Man's Mail 156

6 The Talking Telegraph 200

7 Telephomania 238

8 Second Nature 269

9 Gray Wolves 311

10 Universal Service 340

11 One Great Medium? 370

Epilogue: The Technical Millennium 407

Chronology of American Telecommunications 415

Notes 425

Acknowledgments 501

Index 505

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