Neurobiology for Clinical Social Work: Theory and Practice / Edition 1

Hardcover (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$8.79
(Save 71%)
Est. Return Date: 11/21/2014
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$25.44
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $16.97
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 43%)
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (10) from $16.97   
  • New (8) from $22.31   
  • Used (2) from $16.97   

Overview

The last fifteen years have produced an explosion of research on the neurobiology of attachment.
This research, which explores the ways in which affect regulation play key roles in determining the structure and function of the developing brain and mind, has led to a revolution in the way that parent-child relationships are viewed. Although these insights have informed psychiatry as well as cognitive and psychoanalytic psychology, their application to social work practice, education, and research has been lacking.
Here for the first time ever, social work educators Jeffrey Applegate and Janet Shapiro demystify neurobiology and present it anew with the social work audience specifically in mind. Social workers, by virtue of their work with at-risk children and families, occupy a unique position from which to employ this new research in prevention and intervention. This lack of education about neurobiology has unfortunately fostered misconceptions among social workers that these theories are too academic and thus irrelevant to clinical practice. Neurobiology for Clinical Social Work corrects this misconception and introduces social workers to the powerful and practical ideas that are coming out of neurobiological research. The research summarized here offers new insights about the crucial role that relationships play in human development and in professional helping efforts. To set the stage for this inquiry, the authors introduce fundamentals of brain structure, development, and functioning in the first parts of the book.
This introduction is intended as a primer and proceeds from the assumption that many readers are relatively unfamiliar with the field of brain science. Building on this foundation, the authors go on to describe the manner in which memory and affect regulation are neuropsychological processes. The next chapters of the book delve into the concepts of attachment. Specifically, the authors are concerned with how precursors to attachment evolve during the earliest months of an infant’s life and how various attachment classifications (secure, insecure, disorganized) lead to affect regulation—the ability of a child to regulate emotion. Throughout the book these concepts are discussed in the context of what social workers face when trying to find explanatory structures for the ways in which early childhood experiences affect later life. Later chapters turn even more directly toward practice. Using case examples—including adolescent parents and their children, children with a depressed parent, and children of substance abusing parents—Applegate and Shapiro show clinicians how to make use of neurobiological concepts in designing treatment plans and interventions. One chapter contains three extended case examples, with commentary, representing the three most common intervention models taught in schools of social work—psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and systemic. Various settings, such as community mental health, family service agencies, and child welfare, are also discussed.
In order to be effective and meet the complex challenges of the twenty-first century, social work professionals must join with their colleagues in other disciplines in coordinated efforts to integrate and apply newly emerging knowledge toward the enhancement of human well-being. Neurobiology for Clinical Social Work is a great place to start this process of integration and learning.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Virginia Child Protection Newsletter
“Very readable...Social workers will discover practical and effective ways to incorporate neurobiological findings into their everyday repertoire of techniques.”
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Sciences: The Journal of Contemporary Social
An engaging and accessible book…an excellent source of reference for social work practitioners and clinicians in general.”— Shoshana Ringel
Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Sciences
An engaging and accessible book…an excellent source of reference for social work practitioners and clinicians in general.— Shoshana Ringel
Dennis Miehls
“A major contribution to social work literature…I congratulate the authors in this fine accomplishment.”
Shoshana Ringel - Families in Society: The Journal of Contemporary Social Services
“An engaging and accessible book…an excellent source of reference for social work practitioners and clinicians in general.”
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780393704204
  • Publisher: Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
  • Publication date: 7/29/2005
  • Series: Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 273,480
  • Product dimensions: 6.40 (w) x 9.60 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Jeffrey S. Applegate, Ph.D. is Professor of Social Work and Social Research at Bryn Mawr College. Trained in psychiatric social work at the Menninger Foundation, Applegate is coauthor of The Facilitating Partnership: A Winnicottian Approach for Social Workers and Other Helping Professionals.

Janet R. Shapiro, Ph. D.,is Associate Professor of Social Work and Social Research, as well as Director of the Center for Child and Family Well-Being, at Bryn Mawr College. She holds dual degrees in social work and developmental psychology, and is coauthor of Complex Adoption and Assisted Reproductive Technology: A Developmental Framework for Clinical Practice.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Ch. 1 The brain : an introductory tutorial 1
Ch. 2 The neurobiology of memory 15
Ch. 3 Affect : toward a neuropsychological integration 26
Ch. 4 Early affect regulation : prelude to attachment 40
Ch. 5 Attachment : the relational base of affect regulation 58
Ch. 6 Vulnerable dyads : the quality of early caregiving relationships 82
Ch. 7 Infant mental health : from understanding to prevention 119
Ch. 8 Neurobiology applied : affect dysregulation and its treatment 141
Ch. 9 Three case studies 160
Ch. 10 New directions for social work education 202
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)