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Neurobiology of Alzheimer's Disease
     

Neurobiology of Alzheimer's Disease

by David Dawbarn (Editor), Shelley J. Allen (Editor), S. J. Allen (Editor)
 

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Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in the elderly; 450,000 people in the UK and 4.5 million people in the USA suffer with this disease. This 3rd edition of Neurobiology of Alzheimer's Disease gives a comprehensive and readable account of the disease, from molecular pathology to clinical practice.

The book is intended for readers new to the field

Overview

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in the elderly; 450,000 people in the UK and 4.5 million people in the USA suffer with this disease. This 3rd edition of Neurobiology of Alzheimer's Disease gives a comprehensive and readable account of the disease, from molecular pathology to clinical practice.

The book is intended for readers new to the field, but it also covers an extensive range of themes for those with in-depth knowledge of Alzheimer's disease. It will therefore act either as an introduction to the whole field of neurodegeneration, or it will help experienced researchers to access the latest research in specialist topics. Each chapter is written by eminent scientists leading their fields in neuropathology, clinical practice, and molecular neurobiology; appendices detail disease-associate proteins, their sequences, familial mutations, and known structures.

It will be essential reading for students, researchers, and clinicians interested in neurodegeneration, giving a coherent and cohesive approach to the whole area of research. For those in the pharmaceutical industry it describes the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and explains how current and potential therapeutics may work.

Editorial Reviews

3 Stars from Doody
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Charles C Wang, MD, MS (University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine)
Description: This book reviews the new advances in the broad aspects of basic research and related clinical applications in the area of Alzheimer's disease. The first edition was published in 1995.
Purpose: The authors aim to provide an accessible overview of each of the predominant aspects of Alzheimer's disease. They wish to provide not only a readable introduction for those new to this subject, but also allow researchers to seek out and appeciate the overlap of their areas of expertise with other areas related to the disease. These are worthy objectives, which the author meets.
Audience: The audience will be reserchers in neurosicence with an interest in Alzheimer's disease and clincians including neurologists, geriatricians, and primary care physicains. The author is a credible authority in the subject matter of the book.
Features: The book covers broad topics in the basic neurobiology of Alzheimer's disease including neuropathology, molecular biology, genetics, imaging, diagnosis, and pharmacological approaches. The best aspects of the book are the comprehensive reviews of the advances in neuropathology, genetics, and molecular biology. These areas are well organized and illustrated.
Assessment: Alzheimer's disease is the most common dementia in the elderly. The vast expansion of knowledge in molecular biology and genetics makes the pathogenesis of the disease more understandable. The authors gather together the advances in knowledge on Alzheimer's disease in this well organized book. The audience will find the book a useful and handy reference. This new edition is justified because of the accumulation of research developements since the previous edition was published.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781872748146
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
02/28/1998
Series:
Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology Series (BIOS Scientific Publishers) Series
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.90(d)

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