Neuromancer

( 368 )

Overview

"Twenty years ago, it was as if someone turned on a light. The future blazed into existence with each deliberate word that William Gibson laid down. Neuromancer didn't just explode onto the science fiction scene. It permeated into our consciousness, our culture, our science, and our technology. The winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards, Neuromancer showed us what we were capable of creating and what we were capable of destroying - and illuminated the dark corners of the path we were headed down." Today, we have this science ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (17) from $7.52   
  • New (1) from $78.00   
  • Used (16) from $7.52   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$78.00
Seller since 2010

Feedback rating:

(60)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
1994 Hard cover First edition. Ace Hardcover ed. STATED 1ST EDITION, PRINTING New in new dust jacket. BRIGHT SHINY, BRAND NEW Glued binding. Paper over boards. With dust jacket. ... 278 p. Audience: General/trade. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Sloansville, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Neuromancer

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$7.99
BN.com price
This digital version does not exactly match the physical book displayed here.
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

"Twenty years ago, it was as if someone turned on a light. The future blazed into existence with each deliberate word that William Gibson laid down. Neuromancer didn't just explode onto the science fiction scene. It permeated into our consciousness, our culture, our science, and our technology. The winner of the Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards, Neuromancer showed us what we were capable of creating and what we were capable of destroying - and illuminated the dark corners of the path we were headed down." Today, we have this science fiction masterpiece to thank for the term "cyberpunk," for easing our way into the information age and Internet society. Neuromancer's virtual reality has become our own. And yet, William Gibson's vision still manages to inspire the minds that will take us ever further into the future.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Gerald Jonas
The 21st-century world of ''Neuromancer'' is freshly imagined, compellingly detailed and chilling in its implications....Mr. Gibson's style is all flash, and his characters are all pose without substance....The story moves faster than the speed of thought, but even when I wasn't sure what was happening, I felt confident that Mr. Gibson would pull me through, and he did. The ''cyberspace'' conceit allows him to dramatize computer hacking in nontechnical language, although I wonder how much his somewhat florid descriptions of the ''bodiless exultation of cyberspace'' will mean to readers who have not experienced the illusion of power that punching the keyboard of even a dinky little word-processor can give. (P.S. I still think ''Neuromancer'' is a terrible title.) -- New York Times
Gale Research
Combining the hip cynicism of the rock music underground and the dizzying powers of high technology, the novel was hailed as the prototype of a new style of writing, promptly dubbed "cyberpunk." Gibson, who was also earning praise as a skillful prose stylist, disliked the trendy label but admitted that he was challenging science fiction traditions. "I'm not even sure what cyberpunk means," he told thePhiladelphia Inquirer, "but I suppose it's useful as a tip-off to people that what they're going to read is a little wilder."
Publishers Weekly
William Gibson fans will welcome the 20th-anniversary edition of Neuromancer, the SF novel that launched cyberpunk and anticipated the Internet age. Gibson provides a new introduction, "The Sky Above the Port." Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Neuromancer is a fitting commemoration of the tenth anniversary of publication of Gibson's Nebula, Hugo, and Philip K. Dick Award-winning novel. The text is abridged, read by the author, and enhanced with music, sound effects, and other audio engineering. The plot contains sex, drugs, black market body parts, virtual reality, electronic relationships, pleasure palaces, murder, mayhem, cloned assassins, and intrigue in cyberspace, with nary a virtual nice guy in the mix. Wow! There's just enough time to take a deep breath between cassettes, as the listener is bombarded with strong language, tumultuous violence, and compelling imagery. Terrific stuff. Gibson's horrifying vision of our terrible headlong rush to nowhere is a must for science fiction and adult fiction collections.-Cliff Glaviano, Bowling Green State Univ. Libs., Ohio
Rolling Stone Magazine
Gibson has revitalized science fiction as no other single force in a generation.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780441000685
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 7/1/1994
  • Series: Sprawl Trilogy Series , #1
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Product dimensions: 5.56 (w) x 8.56 (h) x 0.98 (d)

Meet the Author

William Gibson is the author of Neuromancer, Count Zero, Mona Lisa Overdrive, Burning Chrome, Virtual Light, Idoru, All Tomorrow's Parties, and Pattern Recognition.

Biography

Science fiction owes an enormous debt to William Gibson, the cyberpunk pioneer who revolutionized the genre with his startling stories of tough, alienated loners adrift in a world of sinister high technology.

Gibson was born in Conway, South Carolina, and spent much of his youth in Virginia with his widowed mother. He grew up shy and bookish, discovering science fiction and the literature of the beats at a precociously early age. When he was 15, he was sent away to private school in Arizona, but he left without graduating when his mother died suddenly. He fled to Canada to avoid the draft and immersed himself in '60s counterculture. He married, moved to British Columbia, and enrolled in college, graduating in 1977 with a degree in English. Around this time he began to write in earnest, combining his lifelong love of science fiction and his newfound passion for the punk music evolving in New York and London.

In the early 1980s, Gibson met writer and punk musician John Shirley and sci-fi authors Lewis Shiner and Bruce Sterling. All three were blown away by the power and originality of Gibson's stories, and together the four men went on to forge a radical new literary movement called cyberpunk. In 1984, Gibson's groundbreaking first novel, Neuromancer, was published. Daring and revolutionary, it envisioned such techno-marvels as AI, virtual reality, genetic engineering, and multinational capitalism years before they became realities. Although it was not an immediate sensation, Neuromancer struck a chord with hardcore sci-fi fans who turned it into a word-of-mouth hit. Then it won the Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards (the Triple Crown of Science Fiction), catapulting Gibson into superstardom overnight.

Even if he had never written another word, Gibson's impact would be clearly seen in the works of such cutting-edge contemporary authors as Neal Stephenson, Pat Cadigan, and Paul DiFilippo. But, as it is, Neuromancer was just the beginning -- the first book in an inspired trilogy that has come to be considered a benchmark in the history of the genre; and since then, Gibson has gone on to create even more visionary science fiction, including The Difference Engine, a steampunk classic co-authored with Bruce Sterling, and such imaginative post-9/11 cyber thrillers as Pattern Recognition and Spook Country .

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      William Ford Gibson (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
    1. Date of Birth:
      March 17, 1948
    2. Place of Birth:
      Conway, South Carolina
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of British Columbia, 1977

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1

The sky above the port was the color of television, tuned to a dead channel.

            “It’s not like I’m using,” Case heard someone say, as he shouldered his way through the crowd around the door of the Chat. “It’s like my body’s developed this massive drug deficiency.” It was a Sprawl voice and a Sprawl joke. The Chatsubo was a bar for professional expatriates; you could drink there for a week and never hear two words in Japanese.

            Ratz was tending bar, h is prosthetic arm jerking monotonously as he filled a tray of glasses with draft Kirin. He saw Case and smiled, his teeth a webwork of East European steel and brown decay. Case found a place at the bar, between the unlikely tan on one of Lonny Zone’s whores and the crisp naval uniform of a tall African whose cheekbones were ridged with precise rows of tribal scars. “Wage was in her early, with two joeboys,” Ratz said, shoving a draft across the bar with his good hand. “Maybe some business with you, Case?”

            Case shrugged. The girl to his right giggled and nudged him.

            The bartender’s smile widened. His ugliness was the stuff of legend. In an age of affordable beauty, there was something heraldic about his lack of it. The antique arm whined as he reached for another mug. It was a Russian military prosthesis, a seven-function force-feedback manipulator, cased in grubby pink plastic. “You are too much the artiste, Herr Case.” Ratz grunted; the sound served him as laughter. He scratched his overhang of white-shirted belly with the pink claw. “You are the artiste of the slightly funny deal.”

            “Sure,” Case said, and sipped his beer. “Somebody’s gotta be funny around here. Sure the fuck isn’t you.”

            The whore’s giggle went up an octave.

            “Isn’t you either, sister. So you vanish, okay? Zone, he’s a close personal friend of mine.”

            She looked Case in the eye and made the softest possible spitting sound, her lips barely moving. But she left.

            “Jesus,” Case said, “what kinda creepjoint you running here? Man can’t have a drink?”

            “Ha,” Ratz said, swabbing the scarred wood with a rag, “Zone shows a percentage. You I let work here for entertainment value.”

            As Case was picking up his beer, one of those strange instants of silence descended, as though a hundred unrelated conversations had simultaneously arrived at the same pause. Then the whore’s giggle rang out, tinged with certain hysteria.

            Ratz grunted. “An angel has passed.”

            “The Chinese,” bellowed a drunken Australian, “Chinese bloody invented nerve-splicing. Give me the mainland for a nerve job any day. Fix you right, mate…;”

            “Now that,” Case said to his glass, all his bitterness suddenly rising in him like bile, “that is so much bullshit.”

            The Japanese had already forgotten more neurosurgery than the Chinese had ever known. The black clinics of Chiba were the cutting edge, whole bodies of technique supplanted monthly, and still they couldn’t repair the damage he’d suffered in that Memphis hotel.

            A year here and he still dreamed of cyberspace, hope fading nightly. All the speed he took, all the turns he’d taken and the corners he’d cut in Night City, and still he’d see the matrix in his sleep, bright lattices of logic unfolding across that colorless void…;The Sprawl was a long strange way home over the Pacific now, and he was no console man, no cyberspace cowboy. Just another hustler, trying to make it through. But the dreams came on in the Japanese night like livewire voodoo, and he’d cry for it, cry in his sleep, and wake alone in the dark, curled in his capsule in some coffin hotel, his hands clawed into the bedslab, temperfoam bunched between his fingers, trying to reach the console that wasn’t there.

            “I saw your girl last night,” Ratz said, passing Case his second Kirin.

            “I don’t have one,” he said, and drank.

            “Miss Linda Lee.”

            Case shook his head.

            “No girl? Nothing? Only biz, friend artiste? Dedication to commerce?” The bartender’s small brown eyes were nested deep in wrinkled flesh. “I think I liked you better, with her. You laughed more. Now, some night, you get maybe too artistic; you wind up in the clinic tanks, spare parts.”

            “You’re breaking my heart, Ratz.” He finished his beer, paid and left, high narrow shoulders hunched beneath the rainstained khaki nylon of his windbreaker. Threading his way through the Ninsei crowds, he could smell his own stale sweat.

            Case was twenty-four. At twenty-two, he’d been a cowboy, a rustler, one of the best in the Sprawl. He’d been trained by the best, by McCoy Pauley and Bobby Quine, legends in the biz. He’d operated on an almost permanent adrenaline high, a byproduct of youth and proficiency, jacked into a custom cyberspace deck hat projected his disembodied consciousness into the consensual hallucination that was the matrix. A their, he’d worked for other, wealthier thieves, employers who provided the exotic software required to penetrate the bright walls of corporate systems, opening windows into rich fields of data.

            He’s made the classic mistake, the one he’s sworn he’d never make. He stole from his employers. He kept something for himself and tried to move it through a fence in Amsterdam. He still wasn’t sure how he’d been discovered, not that it mattered now. He’d expected to die, then but they only smiled. Of course he was welcome, they told him, welcome to the money. And he was going to need it. Because––still smiling––they were going to make sure he never worked again.

            They damaged his nervous system with a wartime Russian mycotoxin.

            Strapped to a bed in a Memphis hotel, his talent burning out micron by micron, he hallucinated for thirty hours.

            The damage was minute, subtle, and utterly effective.

            For Case, who’d lived for the bodiless exultation of cyberspace, it was the Fall. In the bars he’d frequented as a cowboy hotshot, the elite stance involved a certain relaxed contempt for the flesh. The body was meat. Case fell into the prison of his own flesh.

            His total assets were quickly converted to New Yen, a fat sheaf of the old paper currency that circulated endlessly through the closed circuit of the world’s black markets like the seashells of the Trobriand islanders. It was difficult to transact legitimate business with cash in the Sprawl; in Japan, it was already illegal.

            In Japan, he’d known with a clenched and absolute certainty, he’d find his cure. In Chiba. Either in a registered clinic or in the shadowland of black medicine. Synonymous with implants, nerve-splicing, and microbionics, Chiba was a magnet for the Sprawl’s techno-criminal subcultures.

            In Chiba, he’d watched his New Yen vanish in a two-month round of examinations and consultations. The men in the black clinics, his last hope, had admired the expertise with which he’d been maimed, and then slowly shaken their heads.

            Now he slept in the cheapest coffins, the ones nearest the port, beneath the quartz-halogen floods that lit the docks all night like vast stages; where you couldn’t see the lights of Tokyo for the glare of the television sky, not even the towering hologram logo of the Fuji Electric Company, and the Tokyo Bay was a black expanse where gulls wheeled above drifting shoals of white styrofoam. Behind the port lay the city, factory domes dominated by the vast cubes of corporate arcologies. Port and city were divided by a narrow borderland of older streets, an area with no official name. Night City, with Ninsei its heart. By day, the bars down Ninsei were shuttered and featureless, the neon dead, the holograms inert, waiting, under the poisoned silver sky.

—Reprinted from Neuromancer by William Gibson by permission of Berkley, a member of Penguin Putnam Inc. Copyright © 1984, William Gibson. All rights reserved. This excerpt, or any parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form without permission.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 368 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(200)

4 Star

(96)

3 Star

(40)

2 Star

(20)

1 Star

(12)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 368 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 17, 2008

    I Also Recommend:

    The best kind of Sci-fi...imo

    First off, I have to say that I was introduced to this novel by seeing, loving and researching The Matrix. I believe that the movie was just absolutely fantastic and amazing and any other adjective that I can think of (Just not at the moment). So, I picked up this book from the library to see what it was all about.<BR/>It was pretty good basically sums it up. It had innovative settings and ideas and was generally awesome all around, but I just didn't like how sometimes certain technologies were never explained or were only barely mentioned. That's fine if it is just mentioned in passing, but when you linger on them and detail them without saying what they actually do, that kind of frustrated me.<BR/>Other than that, this book was what I like to call perfect. Everything about it was expertly crafted and written, and I highly recommend it to people interested in cyperbunk or just basic science fiction. I will be getting a copy for my own library.

    10 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 24, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Neuromancer: Escape into Cyberpunk's Roots.

    Neuromancer should be on the top of any Sci-fi fans must read list. What can you say about a book that launched an entire sub-genre of literature? With a breakthrough image of the future that we become a little closer to each day, William Gibson has inspired his fellow authors, futurists, and tech guru's since the day it was published. How many other works of art have reached a level of influence that in spawns a whole world with its own spinoffs in the works of Shadowrun?

    Read it. If you have ever dreamed of the future, wanted to see the internet you surf, or use technology to make yourself a better YOU Neuromancer contains all of that and more.

    8 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 9, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent book

    For years I'd heard about what a great book this is, and how it was one of the defining novels of cyberpunk. Unfortunately, I was not interested in cyberpunk, or Neuromancer. Recently, however, my attitude changed, and decided to pick it up. I'm sorry I waited so long.

    Neuromancer is, almost 30 years after it was published, still refreshingly original. Having read it, I can see the influence it's had on other books and movies, yet it feels different from all of its "offspring." Now that I've finished it, what began as a passing interest, "to see what it's all about," has grown into a deep fascination, and I'm looking forward to picking up more of Gibson's books.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 20, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A classic, by all accounts.

    Neuromancer is by no means a long novel, it is under 400 pages composed of many short chapters; this does not mean it is anything like an "easy read."

    Gibson consistently uses words that laymen, or persons-not-from-the-future, will not know in context. Reading this book today the reader most likely feels as if he's missed some crucial background info, possibly a predecessor to the novel that he didn't know existed, but that is not the case with Neuromancer. Throughout the book Gibson weaves his tale while not divulging every detail or aspect about it. By giving the reader a very narrow realistic view, through the eyes of the protagonist, and using technical jargon not invented yet the reader is almost coerced to put himself into the story and try to unravel what is taking place. All of this can make for a confusing read to many readers- and the brilliance of Gibson's work can easily be overlooked.

    I cannot recommend this book for everyone or even avid fans of science fiction. I can only say that I view it as an important book in the history of the science fiction genre and look at it as progenitor to other great masterpieces such as Snow Crash, by Neal Stephenson.

    The story of Neuromancer is exciting but difficult to follow if it fails to grab your attention thoroughly. It won't be uncommon to get confused by the plot while reading Neuromancer but as long as you're attentive and keep reading any conflict should resolve itself as the story unfolds. If you're a science fiction fan looking for a challenging read and interested in a classic then you should pick up Neuromancer.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2012

    Fantastic book

    While at times i had to stop and read a paragraph or two over, it was still an understandable and entertaining book. I would definitely recommend to a sci-fi fan, but i think any of the newer generations can appreciate it

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 11, 2007

    Choppy story

    I only got about half-way through this book. It reminded me a lot of trying to read Gravity's Rainbow where the writing at times was so choppy that I only ever had a vague idea of what was going on. I read several passages a few times and couldn't help but wonder what exactly had happened or why. If you read books by scimming along and getting the general idea of things as you go, then this won't bother you and for that, I'll say it's a neat sci-fi premise.

    4 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2012

    Every bit as good as they say.

    This one's a classic for a reason. This is the book that spawned Cyberpunk, and includes the seeds of ideas that would give us Bladerunner (Do Androids Dream), and eventually The Matrix. So revolutionary that things I've loved have been cribbing off it for years without my knowledge. Good to finally be able to give credit where it's due!

    This one's a must read, whether you're in it for the detective story, the action, or the cybernetic enhancements. Great stuff.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    Best ccyberpunk novel of all time

    anyone who says this is a bad book can punch themselves

    3 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 28, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Neuromancer

    The most important thing to keep in mind when reading 'Neuromancer' is that it was the first to do what it does. Before there was the Matrix trilogy, before iPods and 3D broadcasting home televisions, there was 'Neuromancer'. Written at the same time the very first home PC was released, Gibson envisioned a vast network of connected information called 'cyberspace'. People who sought to break into the databases of others would use their technical skills to link up with the Matrix and and break through layers of ICE to steal information. So basically, Gibson envisioned the internet as we know it, hackers and firewalls. The writing itself is actually pretty confusing. This is also the book that created the genre of cyber-punk, so it is very technically laden and can be mind boggling at times. The story itself is pretty interesting about an AI that seeks autonomy. The characters aren't all that original, in fact almost all of them feel like stereotypical mid 80's action film characters. Perhaps with the exception of the psychotic Riviera. I chose to read 'Neuromancer' because of all the reviews that referred to it as a mind bender. To that I must disagree. I will say that one chapter is VERY mind bending, but the rest, not so much; pretty straight forward actually. But that also may be me viewing the story through the lens of someone who has lived with things like the internet for most of my life. Either way, it is still a good book and an easy read for the most part.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2003

    Err...best cyber-punk novel ever?

    Well, I bought this book because of the numerous awards it recieved (Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick awards), thinking it couldn't be half bad, and it might even revive my waning love of SF. Well, I think it might've nailed the coffin shut. This is the first 'Cyber-punk' novel I've ever read, and probably my last. I actually started this novel ,like, half a year ago and stopped cuz I had no idea what was going on. Well, I finally finished it, still having no idea what it was about. The only reason why I'm giving it three stars is because of the lyrical, almost poetic prose that William Gibson has going on for him. His diction is truly amazing. Other than that, disappointing.

    3 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2013

    Poor pacing makes for a disjointed narrative

    No doubt some will proclaim that Gibson's choppy, stuttering prose is meant to reflect the setting of this dark story. Intentional or not, it makes for a decidedly unpleasant read. The uneven pacing and drug addled perspective of the POV character makes for a fairly boring read. I found myself unimpressed with the setting (scene setting is quite sparse.) and uninterested in the characters. I would only recommend this novel for hardened fans of the cyberpunk sub-genre. Go for Richard Morgan's Thirteen for a better written novel in a similiar setting.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2001

    As Good As Cyberpunk Gets

    From the first sentence, I can see why this novel would be considered such a landmark work in its specific genre. I compliment Gibson for each and every one of his thoroughly-constructed phrases; such precise language is rarely so stylish, having never been presented in such a modern tech-noir context. However, I felt the characters were all throwaways - I immediately thought of the filmed version of 'Mission: Impossible,' in which almost every member of the team dies without the audience getting a chance to care about any of them. In Neuromancer (a sort of 'M:I meets the Matrix'), the reader is presented with a similarly underdeveloped ensemble. Yet film audiences can tolerate shallow characters much easier than any dedicated reader can. Gibson is obviously a talented wordsmith, and I guarantee he could win more Hugos and Nebulas if he spent some time creating at least one fascinating character.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2001

    Probably the Greatest Work of Cyberpunk Ever

    Unfortunately, cyberpunk is not a very good genre. Most cyberpunk authors generally rehash whatever Philip K Dick book they like the most, and Gibson is no exception. The characters are tired-they're cardboard cutouts-as are the AI machines that the characters encounter. This book has its excellent parts, but the basic idea of plugging one's brain into a computer directly is not explored very well, so thinking readers would be better off watching The Matrix. Neuromancer is not a bad book, and it's certainly unique, but it does not stand up to earlier works of science fiction and its main ideas have been explored more fully in The Matrix and modern Anime.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2013

    Started off OK and got less and less interesting

    I'll make this short. The books characters and ideas were more than a bit strange to begin with but had enough substance to hook me into reading it. However, by he time I had gotten halfway through it I had lost all interest in the book. It didn't really seem to have a point and if it had a point it had a very obtuse way of making it. Also the characters had gotten more and more weird and less and less interesting. At that point I stopped reading it which I do with maybe 5-10% of any book I start to read. Watching the grass grow would probably be more interesting than reading this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 22, 2012

    Better than I Remember

    I finished Neuromancer a second time, the first was when I was between 12-14. I barely remembered anything from my first read through of the book so it was practically brand new.

    It's interesting, the way Gibson wrote the book, as his writing mimics the later quick-cuts of first music videos, then later movies. He doesn't languidly slide from one location to another, or one conversation to another. Everything jumps, from viewpoints, to conversations, to concepts.

    I enjoy me a good caper story and I was pleasantly surprised to re-discover this book was a caper of sorts. Gibson certainly withstands the test of time and nostalgia for me. A fantastic book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2012

    Great book

    For those hung up on labels "cyberpunk" is a big pro/con of this book since it basically launched the genre. Ignore all of that marketing hype. This is an excellent near-future science fiction story. It's a perfect combo of action and intricate storyline. Still my favorite of Gibson's works.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2012

    Short answer review.

    Difficult at times to follow as Gibson's descriptions seem bent toward people in the story. Great story otherwise.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2012

    Nostalgia

    I am not sure why this was called a new trend setter back in it's day. Those of you over 60 will recognize the writing style as Micky Spillanes in his "Mike Hammer" series.......with profanity, sex. and sci-fi trappings. If it were music it would be Bill Haley and the Comets VS Brian Eno.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2014

    The start of cyberpunk

    That this is a seminal work of cyberpunk is a well attested fact but it is not a perfect book. Some complain that the words are obtuse but I found it easy to keep up with Gibson's prattling jargon as it was the beat of the novel that propelled the story. What's more difficult was his lack of clarity; there are passages that are just not well written and require one to go over them a few times to find out what's going on. He varies wildly with his writing quality.

    It helps to think of this genre also as tech-noir, for it came from those old black and white movies full of booze and cigarette smoke and dames with a shady past chased by thugs all moved into the near future world of computers and multi-national corporations. It's the stuff that dreams are made of recast for a new generation.

    It is a book worth reading and has some good spots; too bad that this was Gibson's high point and that the stuff I've read since then does not match it. His descriptive passages improved with age but I set Pattern Recognition aside twice as it has no plot whatsoever. Maybe Gibson needs to start taking drugs again to get back the old magic.

    Read this and afterwards watch Blade Runner and see what the eighties prefigured.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 18, 2014

    Slick and Prophetic

    This is an amazing book. One of those that started the cyberpunk genre. Like other good literature, it's a story that works on many levels. Gibson explores a lot of themes that have since become staples. What is humanity? What is love? If I experience something so intensely I can't tell it from reality, is it real? And can reality compare?

    Gibson's prose is at times like one of Van Gogh's paintings. Broad strokes of words that suggest something without providing any fine detail. At other times, he exhibits a laser-like focus and precision, forcing the reader to see something with absolute clarity. His characters are flawed, but by no means simple. Tragic and believable. Reflections of both the dystopian society they inhabit, and our own.

    So when you read it, don't think to yourself "Gosh, I've seen that a hundred times." Instead think "Dang, this is where those others got the idea!"

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 368 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)