Neuropsychology of Memory

Overview

This classic reference and text brings together leading neuroscientists to describe current approaches to the study of memory. The third edition gives particular attention to neuroimaging, which has emerged in the past decade as one of the most active areas of research in the field. Other major approaches covered are lesions; electrophysiology; single-unit recording; pharmacology; and molecular genetics, including new work with genetically modified mice. Chapters are organized into three sections, presenting ...
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Overview

This classic reference and text brings together leading neuroscientists to describe current approaches to the study of memory. The third edition gives particular attention to neuroimaging, which has emerged in the past decade as one of the most active areas of research in the field. Other major approaches covered are lesions; electrophysiology; single-unit recording; pharmacology; and molecular genetics, including new work with genetically modified mice. Chapters are organized into three sections, presenting state-of-the-art studies of memory in humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents and birds. Each chapter explicates the theoretical and methodological underpinnings of the authors' research program, reviews salient empirical findings, and identifies promising directions for future investigation. Featured are more than 50 illustrations, including three in color.

Studies of normal/abnormal memory in humans, monkeys, rodents, birds & invertebrates.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This impressive third edition covers a wide range of topics in an ever more sophisticated field. The volume's scope and the care with which it has been edited will once again make it a well-thumbed standard on many a bookshelf. Written by leading international figures in memory research as well as up-and-coming young investigators, chapters examine current issues and debates in a refreshingly open manner. Resolving these areas of controversy will be the mainspring of future advances in the field."—Professor Richard Morris, DPhil, FRS, Department of Neuroscience, University of Edinburgh, UK

"The science of memory has made remarkable progress during recent years, largely because of its now firmer-than-ever connections to the brain. This outstanding volume provides up-to-date and highly authoritative coverage of the striking progress in the field, in the areas of neuroimaging of human memory, neuropsychological analyses of brain-damaged patients, and neurobiological studies of non-human primates and other animals. Written by leading experts at the cutting edge of contemporary research, the third edition of Neuropsychology of Memory, like its predecessors, will prove an indispensable guide for both novices and veterans in memory research."—Endel Tulving, PhD, Rotman Research Institute of Baycrest Centre

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Nicholas Greco IV, MS, BCETS, CATSM (Columbia College of Missouri)
Description: This is the third edition of a book that incorporates the ever-changing technology and the approaches to the study of memory. The first edition was published in 1984 and the second edition in 1992.
Purpose: The purpose is provide updated and current thinking within the field of neuropsychology. The editors have compiled a collection of notable scientists to share their current approaches to the study of memory and to summarize their thoughts and ideas. Of interest are the chapters which discuss functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) as these neuroimaging techniques were not used or unavailable at the time of the second edition in 1992. The book is a worthy contribution to the field and meets the objectives.
Audience: This book is intended primarily for graduate students, academicians, researchers, and neuropsychologists. The editors and contributors are credible authorities in the field.
Features: The book is broken down into three parts: the first presents the studies of normal and abnormal memory in humans; the second, studies of memory in nonhuman primates; and the third, studies of memory in rodents and birds. The chapters are thorough, some chapters are technical yet readable, and the topics are quite relevant. The chapters on Alzheimer's developmental amnesia, and memory rehabilitation are a must read. The index is user-friendly, and this book has continued staying power as a teaching text.
Assessment: A well-written and smartly updated edition in what continues to be a prominent book within the field. This is an appropriate replacement of the 1992 edition and will continue to serve the needs of researchers as well as serve as a solid teaching tool.
Booknews
Reflects the progress--in the eight years since the first edition--in understanding the organization of memory and its neurological functions, due in part to the increased availability of animal models of human memory impairment. This edition is organized into three sections: Studies of Normal and Abnormal Memory in Humans; Studies of Monkeys and Rodents; and Studies in Birds and Invertebrates. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
From The Critics
Seventy-nine international neuroscientists contribute to the fully revised and updated third edition of this text, describing their current approaches in the study of memory and findings from resent research. Thirty-eight chapters are organized into sections on studies of normal and abnormal memory in humans, of memory in nonhuman primates, and of memory in rodents and birds. The many changes in the field since the 1992 publication of the second edition are reflected in the new text, including the use of positron emission tomography and the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging in research on memory. Other approaches discussed include lesions; electrophysiology; single-unit recording; pharmacology; and molecular genetics, including new work with genetically modified mice. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

4 Stars! from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781572307315
  • Publisher: Guilford Publications, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/6/2002
  • Edition description: Third Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 544
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 1.19 (d)

Meet the Author

Larry R. Sqiure , Ph.D , Veterans Affairs Healthcare System , San Diego ,CA ;Departments of Psychiatry , Neurosciences, and Psycology , University of California , San Diego Daniel L. Schacter ,Ph.D , Department of Psycology, Harvard University ,Cambridge ,MA

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Table of Contents

I. Studies of Normal and Abnormal Memory in Humans
1. The Medial Temporal Lobe and Memory
Nicola J. Broadbent, Robert E. Clark, Stuart Zola, and Larry R. Squire
2. Exploring the Neural Bases of Complex Memory
Andrew R. Mayes
3. Impaired and Preserved Memory Processes in Amnesia
Mieke Verfaellie and Margaret M. Keane
4. Anterograde and Retrograde Amnesia Following Frontal Lobe, Temporal Lobe, or Diencephalic Lesions
Michael D. Kopelman and Nicola Stanhope
5. Relational Binding Theory and the Role of Consolidation in Memory Retrieval
Arthur P. Shimamura
6. Cross-Cortical Consolidation as the Core Defect in Amnesia: Prospects for Hypothesis Testing with Neuropsychology and Neuroimaging
Ken A. Paller
7. Developmental Amnesia: A Challenge to Current Models?
Alan Baddeley
8. Impact of Temporal Lobe Amnesia, Aging, and Awareness on Human Eyeblink Conditioning
John F. Disterhoft, Maria C. Carrillo, Catherine B. Fortier, John D. E. Gabrieli, M-Grace Knuttinen, Regina McGlinchey-Berroth, Alison Preston, and Craig Weiss
9. Memory Illusions in Amnesic Patients: Findings and Implications
Daniel L. Schacter, Mieke Verfaellie, and Wilma Koutstaal
10. The Neuropsychology of False Facial Recognition
Steven Z. Rapcsak, Lis Nielsen, Elizabeth L. Glisky, and Alfred W. Kaszniak
11. The Role of the Basal Ganglia in Learning and Memory
Barbara J. Knowlton
12. Electrophysiological Studies of Retrieval Processing
Michael D. Rugg, Jane E. Herron, and Alexa M. Morcom
13. Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Memory Retrieval
Kathleen B. McDermott and Randy L. Buckner
14. Cognitive Control and Episodic Memory: Contributions from Prefrontal Cortex
Anthony D. Wagner
15. Where Encoding and Retrieval Meet in the Brain
Lars Nyberg
16. Hippocampal Novelty Responses Studied with Functional Neuroimaging
R. J. Dolan and B. A. Strange
17. The Neural Basis of Working Memory Storage, Rehearsal, and Control Processes: Evidence from Patient and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies
Mark D'Esposito and Bradley R. Postle
18. Functional Anatomy of Motor Skill Learning
Julien Doyon and Leslie G. Ungerleider
19. Searching for the Neural Correlates of Object Priming
Alex Martin and Miranda van Turennout
20. Neuropsychological Approaches to Preclinical Identification of Alzheimer's Disease
Marilyn S. Albert and Mark B. Moss
21. Memory Rehabilitation
Barbara A. Wilson
22. Circadian Rhythms and Memory in Aged Humans and Animals
Gordon Winocur and Lynn Hasher

II. Studies of Memory in Nonhuman Primates
23. Cortical Memory Systems in the Nonhuman Primate: An Anatomical and Physiological Perspective
Wendy A. Suzuki
24. Neuronal Representation of Visual Long-Term Memory and Its Top-Down Executive Processing
Emi Takahashi and Yasushi Miyashita
25. Multiple Neuronal Mechanisms for Memory in the Anterior Inferior Temporal Cortex of Monkeys
Elizabeth A. Buffalo and Robert Desimone
26. The Medial Temporal Lobe Structures and Object Recognition Memory in Nonhuman Primates
Jocelyn Bachevalier, Sarah Nemanic, and Maria C. Alvarado
27. Arbitrary Sensorimotor Mapping and the Life of Primates
Elizabeth A. Murray, Peter J. Brasted, and Steven P. Wise

III. Studies of Memory in Rodents and Birds
28. Declarative Memory: Cognitive Mechanisms and Neural Codes
Howard Eichenbaum
29. Representation of Spatial Information by Dynamic Neuronal Circuits in the Hippocampus
Edvard I. Moser, Stig A. Hollup, and May-Britt Moser
30. Integrating Systems for Event Memory: Testing the Contribution of the Fornix
John P. Aggleton and Malcolm W. Brown
31. Subregional Analysis of Hippocampal Function in the Rat
Raymond P. Kesner, Paul E. Gilbert, and Inah Lee
32. How Sensory Experience Shapes Cortical Representations
Michael P. Kilgard
33. The Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System and Memory: Beware of Dogma
Mark G. Baxter and Stephanie L. Murg
34. The Amygdala Regulates Memory Consolidation
James L. McGaugh
35. Memory Modulation: Regulating Interactions between Multiple Memory Systems
Paul E. Gold
36. The Orbitofrontal Cortex: Modeling Prefrontal Function in Rats
Geoffrey Schoenbaum, Barry Setlow, and Michela Gallagher
37. Genetics of Memory in the Mouse
Mark Mayford and Edward Korzus
38. Testing Episodic-Like Memory in Animals
Nicola S. Clayton and Daniel P. GriffithsI. Studies of Normal and Abnormal Memory in Humans
1. The Medial Temporal Lobe and Memory
Nicola J. Broadbent, Robert E. Clark, Stuart Zola, and Larry R. Squire
2. Exploring the Neural Bases of Complex Memory
Andrew R. Mayes
3. Impaired and Preserved Memory Processes in Amnesia
Mieke Verfaellie and Margaret M. Keane
4. Anterograde and Retrograde Amnesia Following Frontal Lobe, Temporal Lobe, or Diencephalic Lesions
Michael D. Kopelman and Nicola Stanhope
5. Relational Binding Theory and the Role of Consolidation in Memory Retrieval
Arthur P. Shimamura
6. Cross-Cortical Consolidation as the Core Defect in Amnesia: Prospects for Hypothesis Testing with Neuropsychology and Neuroimaging
Ken A. Paller
7. Developmental Amnesia: A Challenge to Current Models?
Alan Baddeley
8. Impact of Temporal Lobe Amnesia, Aging, and Awareness on Human Eyeblink Conditioning
John F. Disterhoft, Maria C. Carrillo, Catherine B. Fortier, John D. E. Gabrieli, M-Grace Knuttinen, Regina McGlinchey-Berroth, Alison Preston, and Craig Weiss
9. Memory Illusions in Amnesic Patients: Findings and Implications
Daniel L. Schacter, Mieke Verfaellie, and Wilma Koutstaal
10. The Neuropsychology of False Facial Recognition
Steven Z. Rapcsak, Lis Nielsen, Elizabeth L. Glisky, and Alfred W. Kaszniak
11. The Role of the Basal Ganglia in Learning and Memory
Barbara J. Knowlton
12. Electrophysiological Studies of Retrieval Processing
Michael D. Rugg, Jane E. Herron, and Alexa M. Morcom
13. Functional Neuroimaging Studies of Memory Retrieval
Kathleen B. McDermott and Randy L. Buckner
14. Cognitive Control and Episodic Memory: Contributions from Prefrontal Cortex
Anthony D. Wagner
15. Where Encoding and Retrieval Meet in the Brain
Lars Nyberg
16. Hippocampal Novelty Responses Studied with Functional Neuroimaging
R. J. Dolan and B. A. Strange
17. The Neural Basis of Working Memory Storage, Rehearsal, and Control Processes: Evidence from Patient and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Studies
Mark D'Esposito and Bradley R. Postle
18. Functional Anatomy of Motor Skill Learning
Julien Doyon and Leslie G. Ungerleider
19. Searching for the Neural Correlates of Object Priming
Alex Martin and Miranda van Turennout
20. Neuropsychological Approaches to Preclinical Identification of Alzheimer's Disease
Marilyn S. Albert and Mark B. Moss
21. Memory Rehabilitation
Barbara A. Wilson
22. Circadian Rhythms and Memory in Aged Humans and Animals
Gordon Winocur and Lynn Hasher

II. Studies of Memory in Nonhuman Primates
23. Cortical Memory Systems in the Nonhuman Primate: An Anatomical and Physiological Perspective
Wendy A. Suzuki
24. Neuronal Representation of Visual Long-Term Memory and Its Top-Down Executive Processing
Emi Takahashi and Yasushi Miyashita
25. Multiple Neuronal Mechanisms for Memory in the Anterior Inferior Temporal Cortex of Monkeys
Elizabeth A. Buffalo and Robert Desimone
26. The Medial Temporal Lobe Structures and Object Recognition Memory in Nonhuman Primates
Jocelyn Bachevalier, Sarah Nemanic, and Maria C. Alvarado
27. Arbitrary Sensorimotor Mapping and the Life of Primates
Elizabeth A. Murray, Peter J. Brasted, and Steven P. Wise

III. Studies of Memory in Rodents and Birds
28. Declarative Memory: Cognitive Mechanisms and Neural Codes
Howard Eichenbaum
29. Representation of Spatial Information by Dynamic Neuronal Circuits in the Hippocampus
Edvard I. Moser, Stig A. Hollup, and May-Britt Moser
30. Integrating Systems for Event Memory: Testing the Contribution of the Fornix
John P. Aggleton and Malcolm W. Brown
31. Subregional Analysis of Hippocampal Function in the Rat
Raymond P. Kesner, Paul E. Gilbert, and Inah Lee
32. How Sensory Experience Shapes Cortical Representations
Michael P. Kilgard
33. The Basal Forebrain Cholinergic System and Memory: Beware of Dogma
Mark G. Baxter and Stephanie L. Murg
34. The Amygdala Regulates Memory Consolidation
James L. McGaugh
35. Memory Modulation: Regulating Interactions between Multiple Memory Systems
Paul E. Gold
36. The Orbitofrontal Cortex: Modeling Prefrontal Function in Rats
Geoffrey Schoenbaum, Barry Setlow, and Michela Gallagher
37. Genetics of Memory in the Mouse
Mark Mayford and Edward Korzus
38. Testing Episodic-Like Memory in Animals
Nicola S. Clayton and Daniel P. Griffiths

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