Neuroscience and Philosophy: Brain, Mind, and Language / Edition 1

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Overview

In Neuroscience and Philosophy three prominent philosophers and a leading neuroscientist clash over the conceptual presuppositions of cognitive neuroscience. The book begins with an excerpt from Maxwell Bennett and Peter Hacker's Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience (Blackwell, 2003), which questions the conceptual commitments of cognitive neuroscientists. Their position is then criticized by Daniel Dennett and John Searle, two philosophers who have written extensively on the subject, and Bennett and Hacker in turn respond.

Their impassioned debate encompasses a wide range of central themes: the nature of consciousness, the bearer and location of psychological attributes, the intelligibility of so-called brain maps and representations, the notion of qualia, the coherence of the notion of an intentional stance, and the relationships between mind, brain, and body. Clearly argued and thoroughly engaging, the authors present fundamentally different conceptions of philosophical method, cognitive-neuroscientific explanation, and human nature, and their exchange will appeal to anyone interested in the relation of mind to brain, of psychology to neuroscience, of causal to rational explanation, and of consciousness to self-consciousness.

In his conclusion Daniel Robinson (member of the philosophy faculty at Oxford University and Distinguished Professor Emeritus at Georgetown University) explains why this confrontation is so crucial to the understanding of neuroscientific research. The project of cognitive neuroscience, he asserts, depends on the incorporation of human nature into the framework of science itself. In Robinson's estimation, Dennett and Searle fail to support this undertaking; Bennett and Hacker suggest that the project itself might be based on a conceptual mistake. Exciting and challenging, Neuroscience and Philosophy is an exceptional introduction to the philosophical problems raised by cognitive neuroscience.

Columbia University Press

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Editorial Reviews

Science - Barry Dainton

A useful introduction.

Metapsychology - James Sage

Readable and accessible.

Science
A useful introduction.

— Barry Dainton

Metapsychology
Readable and accessible.

— James Sage

CHOICE

[A] rare opportunity to appreciate an encapsulated philosophical debate... Recommended.

Choice
[A] rare opportunity to appreciate an encapsulated philosophical debate... Recommended.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780231140454
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • Publication date: 3/25/2009
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 232
  • Sales rank: 959,551
  • Product dimensions: 5.40 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Maxwell Bennett is professor of neuroscience and university chair at the University of Sydney and scientific director of the Brain and Mind Research Institute. His most recent books are History of the Synapse, The Idea of Consciousness, and Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience, which he coauthored with Peter Hacker.Daniel Dennett is Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy and director of the Center for Cognitive Studies at Tufts University. He is the author of numerous books including Freedom Evolves, Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon, and Darwin's Dangerous Idea: Evolution and the Meanings of Life.Peter Hacker is a fellow of St. John's College, Oxford. The leading authority on the philosophy of Wittgenstein, his seventeen books include, most recently, Human Nature: The Categorical Framework, Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience, which he coauthored with Maxwell Bennett, and Wittgenstein: Connections and Controversies.John Searle is Slusser Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of sixteen books, including Freedom and Neurobiology: Reflections on Free Will, Language, and Political Power, Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language, and Mind: A Brief Introduction. His works have been translated into twenty-one languages, and in 2004 he was awarded the National Humanities Medal.

Columbia University Press

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Table of Contents

Introduction, by Daniel Robinson
The Argument Selections from Philosophical Foundations of NeuroscienceNeuroscience and Philosophy, by Maxwell R. Bennett
The Rebuttals
"Philosophy as Naive Anthropology: Comment on Bennett and Hacker," by Daniel Dennett"Putting Consciousness Back in the Brain: Reply to Bennett and Hacker, Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience," by John Searle
Reply to the Rebuttals "The Conceptual Presuppositions of Cognitive Neuroscience: A Reply to Critics," by Maxwell R. Bennett and Peter M. S. Hacker
Epilogue, by Maxwell R. Bennett"Still Looking: Science and Philosophy in Pursuit of Prince Reason," by Daniel Robinson
Notes

Columbia University Press

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