Never a Dull Moment

( 2 )

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Essentially a harder-rocking reprise of Every Picture Tells a Story, Never a Dull Moment never quite reaches the heights of its predecessor, but it's a wonderful, multi-faceted record in its own right. Opening with the touching, autobiographical rocker "True Blue," which finds Rod Stewart trying to come to grips with his newfound stardom but concluding that he'd "rather be back home," the record is the last of Stewart's series of epic fusions of hard rock and folk. It's possible to hear Stewart go for superstardom with the hard-rocking kick and fat electric guitars of the album, but the songs still cut to the core. "You Wear It Well" is a "Maggie May" rewrite on...
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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Essentially a harder-rocking reprise of Every Picture Tells a Story, Never a Dull Moment never quite reaches the heights of its predecessor, but it's a wonderful, multi-faceted record in its own right. Opening with the touching, autobiographical rocker "True Blue," which finds Rod Stewart trying to come to grips with his newfound stardom but concluding that he'd "rather be back home," the record is the last of Stewart's series of epic fusions of hard rock and folk. It's possible to hear Stewart go for superstardom with the hard-rocking kick and fat electric guitars of the album, but the songs still cut to the core. "You Wear It Well" is a "Maggie May" rewrite on the surface, but it develops into a touching song about being emotionally inarticulate. Similarly, "Lost Paraguayos" is funny, driving folk-rock, and it's hard not to be swept away when the Stonesy hard rocker "Italian Girls" soars into a mandolin-driven coda. The covers -- whether a soulful reading of Jimi Hendrix's "Angel," an empathetic version of Dylan's "Mama, You Been on My Mind," or a stunning interpretation of Etta James' "I'd Rather Go Blind" -- are equally effective, making Never a Dull Moment a masterful record. He never got quite this good ever again.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 3/31/1998
  • Label: Umvd Special Markets
  • UPC: 731455806120
  • Catalog Number: 558061
  • Sales rank: 25,015

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Rod Stewart Primary Artist, Vocals
Ron Wood Acoustic Guitar, Bass, Guitar, Electric Guitar
Pete Sears Bass, Piano
Ian McLagan Organ, Piano
Dick Powell Violin
Brian Piano
Spike Heatley Bass, Upright Bass
Gordon Huntley Steel Guitar
Ronnie Lane Bass, Bass Guitar
Martin Quittenton Acoustic Guitar, Guitar
Speedy Conga
Mickey Waller Drums
Kenney Jones Drums
Speedy Conga
Kenny Jones Drums
Brian Piano
Technical Credits
Rod Stewart Producer, Audio Production
Mike Bobak Engineer
Ed Caraeff Cover Photo
Glyn Johns Engineer
Desmond Strobel Art Direction
John Craig Cover Design
Brian Contributor
Jimmy Horovidtzz Arranger
Jim The Easwig Graphic Supervision
A. Wood Composer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A good album with a few classic songs

    A good Stewart album but not quite enough to give it 5 stars. Well worth having.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A reviewer

    Rod Stewart, riding high with the successes of his "Every Picture Tells a Story" saw himself vaulted above his band members in the Faces, paving the way for the heart of the band, Ronnie Lane, to leave in 1973, for the Faces to collapse in the wake of Lane's departure and for Stewart to leave the shores of Great Britain for the sunny skies of California. And in this midst of his success before his downfall in credibility came his fourth album, "Never a Dull Moment". Back when Rod was Rod and not some fool asking if you thought he was sexy or singing the songs made famous by people as old as his parents, he was a brilliant soul-rock-folk singer teamed up with the greatest partner his music would ever have, Ronnie Wood. The two didn't write everything on the album (like all of the Mercury albums, part of the brilliance is in Rod's unique interpretation of others' songs, here Dylan, Cooke, Hendrix and Etta James), but the songs they did write for "Never a Dull Moment" are among the best of Stewart's career. Stewart's collaboration with Martin Quittenton, "You Wear it Well", while somewhat of a retread of "Maggie May", is still an enjoyable song that has stood the test of time. One can't understate the role of his fellow Faces in the album's gestation. The album simply couldn't have been recorded in the way that it was without Wood and the presences of McLagan, Lane and Jones only help to bolster the album's credibility. No Stewart album on Warner Bros., Atlantic or J Records would sound quite like the Mercury recordings. The Faces were the perfect fit for Stewart, if only his solo successes had never got in the way... at least we have Stewart's first four solo LPs and, of course, the four studio albums by the Faces.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews