Never at War: Why Democracies Will Not Fight One Another

Overview

This lively survey of the history of conflict between democracies reveals a remarkable-and tremendously important-finding: fully democratic nations have never made war on other democracies. Furthermore, historian Spencer R. Weart concludes in this thought-provoking book, they probably never will. Building his argument on some forty case studies ranging through history from ancient Athens to Renaissance Italy to modern America, the author analyzes for the first time every instance in which democracies or regimes ...
See more details below
Paperback (New Edition)
$40.56
BN.com price
(Save 3%)$42.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (15) from $3.49   
  • New (5) from $18.88   
  • Used (10) from $3.49   
Sending request ...

Overview

This lively survey of the history of conflict between democracies reveals a remarkable-and tremendously important-finding: fully democratic nations have never made war on other democracies. Furthermore, historian Spencer R. Weart concludes in this thought-provoking book, they probably never will. Building his argument on some forty case studies ranging through history from ancient Athens to Renaissance Italy to modern America, the author analyzes for the first time every instance in which democracies or regimes like democracies have confronted each other with military force.

Weart establishes a consistent set of definitions of democracy and other key terms, then draws on an array of international sources to demonstrate the absence of war among states of a particular democratic type. His survey also reveals the new and unexpected finding of a still broader zone of peace among oligarchic republics, even though there are more of such minority-controlled governments than democracies in history. In addition, Weart discovers that peaceful leagues and confederations-the converse of war-endure only when member states are democracies or oligarchies. With the help of related findings in political science, anthropology, and social psychology, the author explores how the political culture of democratic leaders prevents them from warring against others who are recognized as fellow democrats and how certain beliefs and behaviors lead to peace or war. Weart identifies danger points for democracies, and he offers crucial, practical information to help safeguard peace in the future.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Michael Mandelbaum
If Weart is right, the study of how to make peace os approaching the status of an applied science. But on the question of how to make democracy we have a very long way to go. -- The New York Times Book Review
Library Journal
One of our cherished mythologies is that democracies do not fight each other. Weart, director of the Center for the History of Physics at the American Insitute of Physics and author most recently of Nuclear Fear: A History of Images (LJ 5/1/88), has examined hundreds of battles over the centuries between republics, oligarchies, democracies, and autocracies to show that, indeed, democracies do not seem to attack one another. The reason, Weart proposes, turns out to be rather simple: democratic leaders are not inclined to war on other nations whose citizenry hold the same basic ideals and principles as they. The author concludes that this is not the case with republics or with nations ruled by autocracies or dictators. Since the enemy is easier to designate as the "other," war more readily transpires. Weart bases his thesis on an enormous amount of research in historical, sociological, anthropological, and political science sources. He mixes the methodologies of all these disciplines to arrive at his well-argued conclusions. A remarkable piece of scholarship; for all large collections and for those specializing in war and peace studies.--Edward Goedeken, Iowa State Univ. Lib., Ames
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780300082982
  • Publisher: Yale University Press
  • Publication date: 4/1/2000
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 434
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.97 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface vii
Chapter 1 Investigating the Puzzle of Democratic Peace 1
Chapter 2 Ancient Greece: Definitions and a Pattern of Peace 24
Chapter 3 Medieval Italy: Wars Without States 38
Chapter 4 The Rise of Republican States, Ideals, and Alliances 56
Chapter 5 The Political Culture of Peace 75
Chapter 6 The Swiss Republics: Defining an Enemy 94
Chapter 7 Oligarchy, Intervention, and Civil War 113
Chapter 8 Republics Versus Autocracies 135
Chapter 9 Well-Established Republics Versus Authoritarian Regimes 146
Chapter 10 Well-Established Republics Versus Newborn Republics 164
Chapter 11 Authoritarian Diplomacy 179
Chapter 12 Republican Diplomacy 201
Chapter 13 Imperialist Aggression by Democracies 220
Chapter 14 Leagues of Republics 244
Chapter 15 Crusading for Democracy 270
Appendix Military Confrontations Between Approximately Republican Regimes of the Same Kind 297
Notes 319
Index 413
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)