Never for Want of Powder: The Confederate Powder Works in Augusta, Georgia

Overview


Lavishly illustrated with seventy-four color plates and fifty black-and-white photographs and drawings, Never for Want of Powder tells the story of a world-class munitions factory constructed by the Confederacy in 1861, the only large-scale permanent building project undertaken by a government often characterized as lacking modern industrial values. In this comprehensive examination of the powder works, five scholars--a historian, physicist, curator, architectural historian, and biographer--bring their combined ...
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Overview


Lavishly illustrated with seventy-four color plates and fifty black-and-white photographs and drawings, Never for Want of Powder tells the story of a world-class munitions factory constructed by the Confederacy in 1861, the only large-scale permanent building project undertaken by a government often characterized as lacking modern industrial values. In this comprehensive examination of the powder works, five scholars--a historian, physicist, curator, architectural historian, and biographer--bring their combined expertise to the task of chronicling gunpowder production during the Civil War. In doing so, they make a major contribution to understanding the history of wartime technology and Confederate ingenuity.
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What People Are Saying

Gary W. Gallagher
"The Confederacy built an impressive manufacturing economy geared to waging war-including a massive powder works at Augusta, Georgia, that produced high-quality powder under the able direction of George Washington Rains. This beautifully illustrated volume provides by far the best examination to date of the Augusta works. Never for Want of Powder merits the attention of anyone interested in the intersection between war-making and industrial production during our nation's first great modern conflict."--(Gary W. Gallagher, author of The Confederate War)
Mary A. DeCredico
"This is an exhaustive, well-written and much needed account of the Confederate Powder Works. The quintet of expert authors have made an impressive contribution to our understanding of how a remarkable group of men created the largest powder works in North America, kept it functioning, and produced millions of rounds of ammunition. Arguably, it was the powder works that allowed the Confederacy to survive militarily for four years."--(Mary A. DeCredico, author of Patriotism for Profit: Georgia's Urban Entrepreneurs and the Confederate War Effort)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781570036576
  • Publisher: University of South Carolina Press
  • Publication date: 4/28/2007
  • Pages: 344
  • Sales rank: 989,622
  • Product dimensions: 10.70 (w) x 14.20 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

C. L. Bragg is the author of Distinction in Every Service: Brigadier General Marcellus A. Stovall, C.S.A..

Charles D. Ross is a professor of physics and dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. He is the author of Trial by Fire: Science, Technology, and the Civil War.

Gordon A. Blaker directed curatorial services at the Augusta Museum of History where he worked with an extensive collection of architectural drawings from the Confederate Powder Works. He currently is a museum specialist at the National Museum of the Army Reserve in Atlanta.

Stephanie A. T. Jacobe holds an M.S. in architectural history from Virginia Commonwealth University and is a contributor to Lost Virginia: Vanished Architecture of the Old Dominion.

Theodore P. Savas is an expert on the life of George Washington Rains. His books include The Red River Campaign: Essays on Union and Confederate Leadership in Louisiana.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2007

    As good as it gets!

    In an age where every topic regard the South's struggle for independence has been hashed and rehashed innumerable times, finally along comes 'Never for Want of Powder.' This book is lavishly illustrated with a true rarity - authentically reproduced color plates from the war period. With the absence of color photography, the unbelieveable detail of the architectual drawings is as close as you can come to actually being there...in fact, some of the drawings have a near 3-D effect as a result of their amazing detail. The authors have done a great job interweaving their different perspectives, and the combination gives the reader a much more interesting insight into the South's only gunpowder manufacturer. If for just the information alone, this book is well worth the time, effort, and cost...but when you add those images...wow. If you are a student of the war, and particularly the Southern side of the story, run, don't walk, to get this.

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