Never Hear the End of It

Never Hear the End of It

5.0 1
by Sloan
     
 
Beloved in their native Canada, where they regularly sell out arenas, Sloan have never risen above cult status in the U.S., despite a slew of smart, hook-filled albums. Not that they haven't tried. Following 1999's critically acclaimed Between the Bridges, the band spent the first half of this decade hoping to gain a

Overview

Beloved in their native Canada, where they regularly sell out arenas, Sloan have never risen above cult status in the U.S., despite a slew of smart, hook-filled albums. Not that they haven't tried. Following 1999's critically acclaimed Between the Bridges, the band spent the first half of this decade hoping to gain a foothold on American radio with two albums of slick, radio-friendly rock that didn't do much beyond displeasing their fan base. So for their eighth outing, they went back to doing it their way and have emerged with a 30-track double album that, from the opening strains of "Flying High Again," announces Sloan's thrilling return. Never Hear the End of It is easily their best since Bridges. Don't be scared off by the sheer number of songs (to which the album title cheekily alludes): Most are less than two minutes long and blend seamlessly into one another à la Side 2 of Abbey Road. This serves Sloan's "any-style-that-works" approach well, giving us glam ("Who Taught You to Live Like That?"), riff-heavy hard rock ("Ill-Placed Trust," "People Think They Know Me"), punk ("Blackout," "HFXNS"), and an abundance of ridiculously catchy guitar pop. Never Hear the End of It? If Sloan keep making albums like this, hopefully no time soon.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
A few records after their career-defining 1996 third album, One Chord Leads to Another, Sloan seemed to fall into a trap that snared many classicist guitar pop bands: their devotion to classic hooks and harmonies, the very thing that set them apart from their peers, began to turn from fresh to familiar. Not that the band's skills diminished, but they were now merely reliable, with each new album offering subtle variations on their signature sound: one might be a little sunnier, one might be a little rougher, but each record could easily be classified as just another good Sloan album. All of this makes their eighth album, Never Hear the End of It, such a welcome shock: it's unmistakably the work of the same band that loves '60s guitar rock -- everything from Merseybeat to the Velvet Underground -- as much as they love new wave and college rock, but they have found a way to make the familiar sound fresh again by constructing the album as a seamless suite spread over 30 songs and fitting on a single CD. The easiest touchstone, of course, is the second side of Abbey Road, where brief snippets separated longer songs that were often multi-segmented, as they are here, but Never Hear the End of It isn't nearly as lush or grandiose as the Beatles' career-capping final recorded album. It's densely saturated with color, yet it's also lean and direct; it may swirl with rushes of psychedelic harmonies and shards of punk guitars, but it's precisely constructed upon the quartet's knack for sharp, memorable pop hooks, so there's a sense of momentum and purpose in how the album winds through the detours and main roads on these 30 songs. This has some of the shaggy eclecticism of The White Album, yet it flows like Rundgren's deliberate head trip A Wizard, a True Star, all the while never abandoning Sloan's pop strengths, which makes Never Hear the End of It a rather remarkable piece of art pop -- one where the concept is evident, but one where the pop elements are never sacrificed for art. Cut for cut, segment for segment, this is as indelible as the best of Sloan, but here the emphasis is not on the individual songs, as it has been on each of their albums in the past decade: the emphasis is on how each of these pieces, each of these hooks, joins together to create a kind of sonic sculpture. Never Hear the End of It is as concrete as that, but it's also a record to get lost in, since it is dense with alluring details that create its own distinct atmosphere. Coming from a band that seemed to be settled comfortably within its own sound, this kind of album is indeed a surprise, but this layered, kaleidoscopic album would not have been possible without good straight-ahead records like Action Pact: on those albums, they mastered their popcraft, and here they apply what they've learned on an inventive, excellent record that's their much-needed next great step forward.

Product Details

Release Date:
01/09/2007
Label:
Yep Roc Records
UPC:
0634457214323
catalogNumber:
2143
Rank:
306673

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Flying High Again
  2. Who Taught You to Live Like That?
  3. I've Gotta Try
  4. Everybody Wants You
  5. Listen to the Radio
  6. Fading into Obscurity
  7. I Can't Sleep
  8. Someone I Can Be True With
  9. Right or Wrong
  10. Something's Wrong
  11. Ana Lucia
  12. Before the End of the Race
  13. Blackout
  14. I Understand
  15. You Know What It's About
  16. Golden Eyes
  17. Can't You Figure It Out?
  18. Set in Motion
  19. Love Is All Around
  20. Will I Belong?
  21. Ill Placed Trust
  22. Live the Life You're Dreaming Of
  23. Living with the Masses
  24. HFXNSHC
  25. People Think They Know Me
  26. I Know You
  27. Last Time in Love
  28. It's Not the End of the World
  29. Light Years
  30. Another Way I Could Do It

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Never Hear the End of It 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Never really liked Sloan...never wanted too...can't help but think their latest (PINK) album will go down as one of our generations best. Love it. Get it.