Never Say Die!

Never Say Die!

2.0 1
by Black Sabbath
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

After quitting briefly following the band's previous tour, singer Ozzy Osbourne returned to Black Sabbath for 1978's Never Say Die! The title track kicks things off with a promising bang but ultimately lacks enthusiasm; a pleasant surprise arrives in the very original and experimental "Air Dance," featuring tasteful piano

Overview

After quitting briefly following the band's previous tour, singer Ozzy Osbourne returned to Black Sabbath for 1978's Never Say Die! The title track kicks things off with a promising bang but ultimately lacks enthusiasm; a pleasant surprise arrives in the very original and experimental "Air Dance," featuring tasteful piano flourishes from leading session keyboardist Don Airey. Never Say Die! is best suited for Sabbath completists.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/25/1990
Label:
Warner Bros / Wea
UPC:
0075992735223
catalogNumber:
3186

Tracks

Album Credits

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Never Say Die! 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ozzy and the boys finally take some chances on this one. I love all Black Sabbath but this disc gives them a fresh direction, too bad it didn't last.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought this was a great recording. I love all the classic Black Sabbath prior to this one, but this album they have matured a bit and it goes over a lot of people's heads who don't listen to it closely. I just think it rocks, especially the song "Shock Wave".
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is by far Black Sabbath's weakest album with Ozzy. It sounds like a pop album.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Black Sabbath's creativity with writing and composing songs for this album probably was not at its optimum. I cannot say for sure, but perhaps after several years of touring, songwriting, composing, and recording affected the band mentally that might have carried over into this album. I rate it four stars, mainly because of bias. I have been a Sabbath fan since 1974, when my sister came home with "Vol.4".
Guest More than 1 year ago
I finally got this on cd and it took me right back to this...possibly the coolest side trip for Sabbath, who never really repeated themselves. This like all of the 70s Sabbath stuff is a must for any 'real' Sabbath fan. They never went 'disco' like so many bands. Never Say Die is nearly punk, Johnny Blade is the stone cold lonely story of a street kid living by the switch-blade...Junior's Eyes is a dreary walk through the sad life of a kid contemplating suicide set to a funky Geezer Butler giving an eery funky backdrop to Ozzy's compelling story and Iommi's whah soaked chords washing a quiet storm of dark atmosphere, Bill Ward is in that real cool unmistakeable zone throughout on this record. A Hard Road takes you on a heavy distant anthemic journey before they belt you with Shock Wave a rocker but the icing is Iommi's wicked out of body whah work on the interlude solo & the dirty dirt on the buzzing outro riff that is like a 70s wind back car some of these sounds are very unique in the catalog of great guitar grit, if you needed to be brought back...Air Dance gets very jazzy on the guitar (if metal could be Steely Dan Iommi somehow pulls it off), Butler and the piano player weave a web of soulful groove and the odd moog thing drifts way in the background the production on this track is outstanding I think this track is magic..Ozzy was so good at being very emotional his story of a dancer that will never dance again, only in her dreams is amazing, Over To You almost brings you back in an anthemic way...flipping off the man or society or whatever...they way they take you places that are dark & definitely Sabbath yet real-worldly is the freshest approach since Hand of Doom to me...Breakout says city with its use of horns (again very jazzy for Sabbath) but somehow paints that backdrop before Swinging The Chain with (Bill Ward??) on the vocal...the agnst filled prisoner lashes out at the prison, or society?? This album to me said in a more conversational way than say Pink Floyd Animals using the tired the sick the poor as the characters in stead of farm animals. This album shows a mature band of artists playing heavy dark rock as their medium and at this this point revelling in their sheer power to create & deliver, society and a view that makes it feel so cool to live even in a dark and often depressing or sad or angry futuristic world that is modern society I still get a lot out of this album whenever I hear it, it actually takes me somewhere, I have finished a journey when it is over every time. This is great music from one of rocks greatest innovators of this tiny renaissance of music created by artists on instruments that only have been around for a very short period of time (in relation to world history), of this period in music this is a classic. .. ...