Never Say Yes to a Stranger: What Your Child Must Know to Stay Safe

Never Say Yes to a Stranger: What Your Child Must Know to Stay Safe

by Susan Newman, George Tiboni
     
 

Designed for elementary school children, this photographically illustrated guide demonstrates what to expect, how to spot trouble, and how to react quickly. Going beyond the vague in ten hypothetical situations any child could face, the stories help children discriminate between well-meaning strangers and those who are not. The book perfects children's decision-making… See more details below

Overview

Designed for elementary school children, this photographically illustrated guide demonstrates what to expect, how to spot trouble, and how to react quickly. Going beyond the vague in ten hypothetical situations any child could face, the stories help children discriminate between well-meaning strangers and those who are not. The book perfects children's decision-making abilities and responses.

The always polite, always obedient child is no longer the ideal. Never Say Yes to a Stranger is the best book to teach youngsters to say "no" when necessary. Written so young children can understand, it has been resoundingly praised by parents, schools, police, scout and religious groups, newspapers and magazines.

"What I like about this book is that it stresses awareness, not fear. It teaches children how to feel confident and in control so that they will know what to say and what to do."

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 3-6 Newman offers valid information, and her advice is usually appropriate in this revision of her 1971 booklet ``Ice Cream Isn't Always Good.'' Unfortunately she presents the information in emotional and didactic stories. An omniscient narrator relates ten possible encounters children may have with strangers. Hillary is kidnapped by a ``mean man''; a woman stranger comes to take Amy home from school. Each story is resolved fortuitously by the child, and advice follows. The final chapters give more tips on how to become stranger-wise. Unlike the child-narrated stories in Terkel and Rench's Feeling Safe Feeling Strong (Lerner, 1984), these stories teach rather than inform, and the author occasionally uses loaded words like ``evil-minded adults'' or ``sneaky strangers.'' In one of the stories, young David has ``a funny feeling'' about a man he recognizes as a family friend. The point of the story is to trust your instincts, but the man's actions do not warrant a frightened reaction. Fearful are the consequences of making all adults seem sinister. When Newman wrote her booklet there was nothing like it, but now better choices are available. Karen K. Radtke, Milwaukee Public Library

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399511141
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
02/13/1985
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 5.00(h) x 1.00(d)

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