Neville

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Overview

“[T]his ingenious foray into breaking into a new neighborhood makes for an amusing and appealing story,” raves School Library Journal.

Written by the acclaimed author of The Phantom Tollbooth, this is a simply told story about a boy who moves to a new neighborhood and finds a unique way to make friends. With whimsical illustrations by award-winning illustrator G. Brian Karas, here is a read-aloud that's great for storytime, and is sure to be a ...

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Overview

“[T]his ingenious foray into breaking into a new neighborhood makes for an amusing and appealing story,” raves School Library Journal.

Written by the acclaimed author of The Phantom Tollbooth, this is a simply told story about a boy who moves to a new neighborhood and finds a unique way to make friends. With whimsical illustrations by award-winning illustrator G. Brian Karas, here is a read-aloud that's great for storytime, and is sure to be a hit among fans of Juster, Karas, and anyone who is "the new kid on the block."

From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 1–3—Finding new friends after a family move can be one of the most devastating traumas of childhood, but Juster and Karas use imagination and humor to address the situation. Told by his mother to take a walk down the block—"you might meet someone"—a child takes her suggestion to a new level. Heading down the sidewalk, he suddenly throws his head back and shouts "NEVILLE" at the top of his lungs. Soon one child, then another, and before long, a bevy of youngsters show up mimicking his cry. Even the neighborhood dogs join in. Questions fly as to who this Neville is and what he is like, and at the end of the day, as everyone goes home for supper, the crowd pleads with the boy to return tomorrow, which, of course, he is happy to do. Karas places likably scruffy-looking children across the spreads and, in sync with the call-outs for "Neville," stretches out hand-written versions of the name in various sizes and colors, cleverly capturing the evolving event with wit and energy. Although Juster doesn't reveal who Neville is until the last page, sharp readers will guess his identity early on. Nevertheless, this ingenious foray into breaking into a new neighborhood makes for an amusing and appealing story.—Barbara Elleman, Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, MA
Publishers Weekly
In this emotionally authentic tale of an unhappy new kid in town, Karas (Young Zeus) pictures the boy—unnamed at first—punting a box off his front stoop, then grumpily taking his mother’s advice to “take a little walk down the block.” The boy slouches to a street corner and begins to call out the name “Neville.” As he shouts, other children gather to help and ask about Neville (“When did he move here?”). Oddly, they never ask the boy his own name, nor do they fret when Neville fails to appear. By sunset, the displaced child can half-smile at having made acquaintances. Karas’s melancholy illustrations brighten and expand as the mood improves; small, quiet type sets the sullen tone, until colorful hand-lettered display type implies the children’s collective chatter. Readers learn the boy’s name only at bedtime (hint: it starts with N), a resolution that reinforces sympathy. Juster (The Odious Ogre) identifies a common, stressful situation, and Karas handles the drama with compassion, implying a lonely, single-parent household. Even if the narrative logic falls short, this poignant tale expresses a longing for connections. Ages 4–8. (Oct.)
From the Publisher
Starred Review, School Library Journal, September 2011:
"...this ingenious foray into breaking into a new neighborhood makes for an amusing and appealing story."

Starred Review, Booklist, October 15, 2011:
"The story’s simple charm comes to life in Juster’s well-paced, spare language. Karas’ deft mixed-media sketches carry remarkable weight. A harmonious blend of text and illustration, this is a warm, reassuring choice for all children who know the anxieties that come with big life changes."

Kirkus Reviews

A little boy, bereft over moving, makes strides toward feeling at home in his new neighborhood.

With uniform houses and patches of lawn, the community depicted evokes Levittown. Karas' mixed-media art employs a bleak, gray palette for the setting, befitting the boy's forlorn feelings. His mother suggests, "Maybe you'd like to take a little walk down the block. You might even meet someone." Though unenthusiastic, he "slowly shuffle[s] away." When he stops and (rather inexplicably) calls out, "Neville," another child hears him, and then another and another, and they all join in. But who is Neville? "Is he new?" one child asks. "Are you a friend of his?" adds another. "His best friend, I guess," he responds. The children wander off, leaving the boy hopeful after making this foray into joining their community. His homecoming is alight with colors that Karas slowly incorporated into prior illustrations, and when his mother tucks him in, she whispers, "Good night, Neville..." Readers then can hope that when the neighborhood children discover that the boy himself is Neville, they will embrace him as surely as they did his search.

A fine treatment of a tried-and-true theme.(Picture book 4-6)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375967658
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 10/25/2011
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 11.40 (w) x 8.60 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

NORTON JUSTER is the acclaimed author of the children's novel The Phantom Tollbooth, and the Caldecott-winning picture book, The Hello, Goodbye Window, among others. His book The Dot and the Line was made into an Academy Award winning film. He was also a practicing architect until his retirement.

G. BRIAN KARAS is the prolific, versatile, and award-winning illustrator and writer of many books for children, including Clever Jack Takes the Cake, which received four starred reviews; How Many Seeds in a Pumpkin?; Are You Going to Be Good?, a New York Times Best Illustrated Book; Home on the Bayou, which was the recipient of the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award; and Muncha! Muncha! Muncha! by Candace Fleming. You can visit him at GbrianKaras.com.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 2 )
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(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 30, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    This book is great!

    Neville is a book about a little boy who made lots of friends. His friends shouted his name a lot but they didn't know it was his name. I think other kids would enjoy this book because it's great. My favorite part of the book is when his mom is really sweet to him. I think this book is special because the boy is really nice. I was also excited that G. Brian Karas illustrated this book because I love his pictures in another book he drew 'I Like Bugs.' I give this book 5 stars!
    Review by Eliot K., age 6, Greater Los Angeles Area Mensa

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2013

    In the book Neville by Norton Juster, Neville moves to a new





    In the book Neville by Norton Juster, Neville moves to a new town and thinks nothing will come his way. His thoughts are shown
    throughout the book using a third-person narrator. Neville, the protagonist, soon discovers that everything comes his way. In
    the book written for young students, Neville runs away and starts calling his name. The kids in his neighborhood start replying to
    Neville and yell his name back to him. Although the kids don’t  know who Neville is, they are dying to meet him. They are wondering
    what he is like. Thousands of questions are rushing through their minds about  Neville. Neville is so happy once everything turns his
    way in new town. 
      Neville changes throughout the story, from being the new kid and feeling left out   to feeling welcome. Neville feels left out in the
    beginning and decides to run away. He thinks that his mom doesn't care because he had no choice about moving. He has a sarcastic
    attitude about everything. He thinks all the kids  in his new town will hate him. He imagines his new teacher telling all of his new
    classmates this:“ Now, class, here is the new boy I told you about, he comes from the South Pole, and you can all make fun of him as
    much as you want.” This is why he thinks all of the new kids will hate him. In the end all of the kids love him and people are crowding
    around him to meet him. 
    G. Brian Karas is the illustrator in the book Neville. He used mixed media for the pictures in the book, and it looks like colored pencils.
    In  the first illustration it describes a lot in just the picture, Neville looks sad and disappointed.You can see the big gray moving van
    pulling away from neville’s new home leaving him and all the stuff. 
     Neville is great book for all ages.The author and illustrator work together to show the details showing whether the character is happy
    or sad. An example is when Neville’s mom is talking about friendship. “‘Maybe you’d like to take a little walk down the block. You might
    even meet someone.’  ‘ Yeah sure,’ he mumbled, ‘like you can make new friends just by walking down the block.’” The illustrator shows
     the expression in the characters, Neville looks sad and put down a lot. It is the van pulling away that makes him feel sad and put down.
     And the mom looks worried. Neville’s face makes his new house look bad and look like a dump.This is a wonderful book that is fun to
    read and exciting to everybody. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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