New and Collected Stories

Overview

With his 1959 novella The Loneliness of the Long- Distance Runner, Alan Sillitoe brought a poetic new voice to working-class England. Certainly no stranger to the harsh realities of blue-collar life himself, Sillitoe was born one of five children to a poor Nottingham factory family. He left school at age fourteen to find work in the very factories from which his father found himself unemployed, and began his writing career during a stint in the Royal Air Force. With the publication of Saturday Night Sunday ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (17) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $79.81   
  • Used (14) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$79.81
Seller since 2013

Feedback rating:

(37)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
PAPERBACK New 078671476X FAST shipping. New Unread Book. (Thank you for shopping from us. Order inquiries handled promptly. )

Ships from: FORT LAUDERDALE, FL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$87.79
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(190)

Condition: New
078671476X New. Looks like an interesting title!

Ships from: Naperville, IL

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$175.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(139)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

With his 1959 novella The Loneliness of the Long- Distance Runner, Alan Sillitoe brought a poetic new voice to working-class England. Certainly no stranger to the harsh realities of blue-collar life himself, Sillitoe was born one of five children to a poor Nottingham factory family. He left school at age fourteen to find work in the very factories from which his father found himself unemployed, and began his writing career during a stint in the Royal Air Force. With the publication of Saturday Night Sunday Morning in 1958 and the subsequent arrival of The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner a year later, Sillitoe quickly established himself as a standout in England's embittered yet immensely talented "Angry Young Men" school of writers, which included, among others, Kingsley Amis and John Osborne. However, like Amis, Sillitoe moved beyond the anger of his youth and compiled an impressively diverse array of work. New and Collected Stories brings together more than forty pieces of short fiction, encompassing Sillitoe's entire career, and includes several previously unpublished stories. It is an essential and comprehensive collection from an often-overlooked gem in the canon of modern fiction and an abiding literary voice for working-class Britain.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Exhaustingly extensive and well-researched, this study of developments in contemporary weapons technology evinces a gee-whiz love of military widgets. It also contains journalist Hambling's desire to explore the murkily overlapping scientific, military and corporate worlds. The result is a book that is for short stretches a breezy guide to everything from vortex cannons to tasers, and everyone from Tesla to Turing. Hambling describes complex procedures and devices in a lucid, uncondescending way, and a reader seeking a quick description of, say, how a rocket plane works or what an E-bomb is need look no further. But the scale and scope of the book indicate an ambition to be something other than a supplementary reference to the novels of Tom Clancy and the press briefings of Donald Rumsfeld. Hambling's underlying thesis is that advances in military technology eventually benefit civilian life (e.g., the Internet), and that the domestic technologies and business opportunities of the future, like nanotechnology, are already to be found in today's military hardware. While gently and inconclusively touched on, the moral implications of this are never really explored in any depth, and the military-industrial complex is seen mostly as an ethically neutral dispenser of fascinatingly nasty devices. The lack of broader context, along with a wearyingly episodic structure, create frustrating limits. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Nathaniel Gye lectures on parapsychology at Cambridge University but doesn't necessarily believe in a spirit world. When the widow of a dead security guard (and former university employee) wrongly accused of stealing a fabulous Renaissance painting asks him to attend a s ance, Nathaniel is understandably reluctant. But the voice of the accused provides clues to the theft and debunks his alleged suicide. Only later does Gye investigate, incurring the wrath of an Italian mobster and uncovering a devious scam. A clever plot full of artful dodging, thwarted seduction, and masterly illusion: for all collections. A Cambridge graduate, Wilson is the author of over 50 books and lives in England. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Cambridge University parapsychology lecturer Nathaniel Gye comes to the aid of a corpse. The voice of security guard Bob Gomer wafts over a seance table, imploring his MS-stricken wife Pearl to contact Dr. Gye (Tripletree, 2003) and prove that he didn't commit suicide and that he wasn't guilty of stealing Antonello da Messina's Renaissance masterpiece Portrait of a Doge while transporting it in a locked van from Heathrow to Bath's Millenium Gallery. Through the medium Mrs. George, Gomer also warns that Gye's wife Katherine, editor of Panache, should stay away from Italy. Of course she goes anyway, and is promptly robbed, then abducted by menacing folks who want her husband to stop dabbling in their affairs. Gye, who has hotfooted it to Florence to find her and continue dabbling into the art theft, is stymied when a master forger dies before they can talk, prompting the release of Katherine, who is now even more determined than him to see things through. The investigation proceeds from Venice to Rome to Bath-with stops along the way to discuss matters with a retired barrister, an illusionist, several unscrupulous Italians, Gomer's brother-in-law, the CID inspector who originally thought Gomer a suicide, and the medium's car-crazy son Kevin-before a final seance explains all. Okay as a locked-van puzzle, but weighted down with Gye's journal entries and outre escapes from gangster widows, international conspiracies, and ectoplasmic manifestations.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780786714766
  • Publisher: Avalon Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/15/2005
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 614
  • Product dimensions: 5.52 (w) x 8.26 (h) x 1.57 (d)

Table of Contents

The loneliness of the long distance runner 1
Uncle Ernest 37
Mr. Raynor the school-teacher 47
The fishing-boat picture 55
Noah's ark 71
On Saturday afternoon 85
The match 93
The disgrace of Jim Scarfedale 101
The decline and fall of Frankie Buller 113
The Ragman's daughter 129
The other John Peel 151
The firebug 157
The magic box 173
The bike 199
To be collected 205
Revenge 229
Chicken 249
Canals 255
The road 273
The rope trick 285
Guzman, go home 305
Mimic 331
Before snow comes 351
Enoch's two letters 371
A trip to Southwell 381
The chiker 399
The end of enoch? 411
Scenes from the life of Margaret 417
The second chance 435
No name in the street 477
The meeting 495
A scream of toys 501
Confrontation 523
The devil's almanack 529
The fiddle 539
The gate of a great mansion 547
A time to keep 553
The sniper 565
Brothers 587
The caller 593
Spitfire 607
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)