History: 99 Cent The New Atlantis

History: 99 Cent The New Atlantis

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by History Bacon
     
 

Collectors Edition! Highly Recommended! There are few writers I have read in my entire life who have taught me more than Francis Bacon. The New Atlantis by Lord Bacon is one of the most important of the Utopian writings because it envisions the advancements in all branches of learning in the Western Hemisphere. Strangely enough, Plato's description of the ancient… See more details below

Overview

Collectors Edition! Highly Recommended! There are few writers I have read in my entire life who have taught me more than Francis Bacon. The New Atlantis by Lord Bacon is one of the most important of the Utopian writings because it envisions the advancements in all branches of learning in the Western Hemisphere. Strangely enough, Plato's description of the ancient Atlantean empire and Bacon's New Atlantis both end suddenly in the middle of a sentence. In 1660 a mysterious person known only as R.H. Esquire attempted to complete Bacon's unfinished book. There was never but one edition of New Atlantis Continued by R.H. Esquire. This extremely rare literary curiosity belongs in all collections of Elizabethan literature and is invaluable to students of Bacon's writings and the Bacon-Shakespeare controversy. "The New Atlantis" is the philosophical and intellectual utopia envisioned by Francis Bacon. Published in 1627, the year after the author's death by his literary executor, speculation is that Bacon wrote his story in 1623 or 1624, which would be after his fall from political power. Unlike many of his other major works, Bacon wrote "The New Atlantis" in English and then had it translated into Latin, an indication that he intended it for a wider, English-speaking audience. Bacon focuses on the duty of the state toward science, and his projections for state-sponsored research anticipate many advances in medicine and surgery, meteorology, and machinery. Although "The New Atlantis" is only a part of his plan for an ideal commonwealth, this work does represent Bacon's ideological beliefs. The inhabitants of Bensalem represent the ideal qualities of Bacon the statesman: generosity and enlightenment, dignity and splendor, piety and public spirit. Bacon breaks from Plato, Aristotle and other ancient writers by insisting that humans do not need to aspire to fewer desires because the extraordinary advances of science would make it possible to appease bodily desires by providing material things that would satisfy human greed. For Bacon there is no reason to waste time and energy trying to get human beings to rise to a higher moral state. In his conception of Solomon's House we see the what Bacon the scientist envisioned for the future of human knowledge in an unfettered intellectual setting. It is easy to see the modern research university is the utility of Bacon's great college. Ultimately, Bacon clearly sees the advances of science as the best way of increasing humanity's control over nature and providing for the comfort and convenience of all people, and England's Royal Society and similar organizations dedicated to scientific progress are generally regarded as embodying Bacon's utopian vision.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940014473439
Publisher:
classics reborn
Publication date:
01/27/2015
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

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