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The New Blackwell Companion to Medical Sociology / Edition 1

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Overview

An authoritative, topical, and comprehensive reference to the key concepts and most important traditional and contemporary issues in medical sociology.

  • Contains 35 chapters by recognized experts in the field, both established and rising young scholars
  • Covers standard topics in the field as well as new and engaging issues such as bioterrorism, bioethics, and infectious disease
  • Chapters are thematically arranged to cover the major issues of the sub-discipline
  • Global range of contributors and an international perspective
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Generally, this is up-to-date review of medical sociology is a necessary source for all medical sociologists....highly recommended." (Choice, October 2010).
Booknews
This introductory text provides clear coverage of the ideas, concepts, themes, and research findings in the field of medical sociology. This edition (last, 1995) includes updated treatment of the dramatic decline in the professional power of physicians, the aftermath of the Clinton Administration's attempt at health care reform in the US, and international comparisons of health care delivery. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Booknews
Cockerham (U. of Alabama-Birmingham) introduces students to the branch of sociology that investigates the social causes and consequences of health and illness, presenting the ideas, concepts, themes, theories, and research findings. The eighth edition, updating earlier ones from 1978-98, incorporates current issues, debates, and findings. The bibliography is extensive, and each chapter ends with a list of relevant Internet sites. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781405188685
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 12/21/2009
  • Series: Wiley Blackwell Companions to Sociology Series , #20
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 616
  • Sales rank: 1,127,390
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 9.70 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

William C. Cockerham is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of the Center for Social Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (USA). He is President of the Research Committee on Health Sociology of the International Sociological Association and a current member of the Editorial Board of the American Sociological Review. His recent books include Social Causes of Health and Disease (2007), Medical Sociology, 11th edition (2010), and the co-authored Health and Globalization (2010).

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Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

PREFACE

The field of medical sociology has undergone considerable change since the first edition of this textbook appeared in 1978. At that time, much of the research in medical sociology was dependent upon the sponsorship of physicians, and a clear division of labor existed between sociologists working in academic departments in universities and those working in health institutions. Today, that situation has changed drastically. Medical sociology is no longer highly dependent on the medical profession for funding or focus—although a strong alliance continues to exist in many cases. Medical sociologists exercise their craft in an increasingly independent manner, either working with a greater degree of partnership with health care professionals or functioning as medicine's critics should the situation warrant it. Furthermore, research and teaching in medical sociology in both universities and health institutions are increasingly similar in the application of theory and usefulness in addressing problems relevant to clinical practice. In sum, medical sociology has evolved into a mature, objective, and independent field of study and work.

Medical sociology has also experienced significant growth worldwide in numbers of practitioners. In many countries, including the United States, Canada, Australia, Great Britain, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, and Singapore, medical sociologists are either the largest or one of the largest specialty groups in sociology. The European Society for Health and Medical Sociology is a large and active professional society, as are the medical sociology sections of the American, British, and German sociologicalassociations. In 1999, the American and British medical sociology sections held their first joint meeting at London University's Royal Holloway College. Elsewhere, the Japanese Society of Health and Medical Sociology is working to further develop the field in its nation, while medical sociologists in Latin America hold regional conferences on a regular basis and have their own Spanish-language journals.

Numerous books, journals, college and university courses, medical programs, and lecture series in medical sociology now exist in different parts of the world. This textbook, for example, has been translated into Chinese by Yang Hui and Zhang Tuohong of Beijing Medical University and published by Huaxia Publishing House in Beijing. In the United States, several universities offer specialties in medical sociology, while two universities, the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of California at San Francisco—both with large medical campuses—offer doctorates in medical sociology. Columbia University in New York City offers a combined Ph.D. program in sociology and public health, while medical sociology has traditionally been the major focus in sociology departments at the University of Kentucky and the University of Miami (Florida). Additionally, there are departments of social medicine, which include medical sociologists, at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as well as McGill University in Montreal.

The principal goal of this textbook since its inception has been to introduce students to medical sociology by presenting the ideas, concepts, themes, theories, and research findings in the field. This edition—the eighth—continues this approach. The intent is to identify and discuss the most current issues, debates, and findings in medical sociology.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The material contained in the pages of this book is my own responsibility in terms of perspective, scope, and style of presentation. Nevertheless, I am deeply grateful to several people for their assistance in preparing the eight editions of this book. I would like to acknowledge the insightful comments of those colleagues who reviewed all or part of this work throughout the revision process. For sharing their views and helping to improve the quality of this book, my appreciation goes to Melvin Barber, Florida A&M University; Paul Berzina, County College of Morris; Deirdre Bowen, University of Washington; Herbert Bynder, University of Colorado; Robert Clark, Midwestern State University; John Collette, University of Utah; Spencer Condie, Brigham Young University; Morton Creditor, University of Kansas Medical Center; Norman Denzin, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Karen A. Donahue, Hanover College; Barry Edmonston, Cornell University; Eliot Freidson, New York University; Reed Geertsen, Utah State University; Sharon Guten, Case Western Reserve University; Joseph Jones, Portland State University; Daniel J. Klenow, North Dakota State University; Sol Levine, Harvard University and the New England Medical Center; Richard C. Ludtke, University of North Dakota; Robert Terry Russell, College of St. Francis; Alexander Rysman, Northeastern University; Jeffrey Salloway, University of New Hampshire; Anne Saunders, College of St. Francis; Neil Smelser, Center for the Advanced Study of the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford; and George J. Warheit, University of Miami (Florida). I would also like to thank three doctoral students in medical sociology at UAB who provided important assistance in the preparation of this edition: Sara Daum, Chris Snead, and Garrison Thompson.

William C. Cockerham
Birmingham, Alabama

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Table of Contents

Preface

Part I: Introduction:

1. Medical Sociology and Sociological Theory: William C. Cockerham (University of Alabama) and Graham Scambler (University College, London)

2. Health and Culture: Stella Quah (National University of Singapore)

3. The Sociology of the Body: Sarah Nettleton (University of York)

Part II: Health and Social Inequalities:

4. Health and Social Stratification: Eero Lahelma (University of Helsinki)

5. Health Status and Gender: Ellen Annandale (University of Leicester)

6. Health, Ethnicity, and Race: Hannah Bradby (University of Warwick) and James Y. Nazroo (University of Manchester)

Part III: Health and Social Relationships:

7. Health and Religion: Ellen L. Idler (Emory University)

8. Health Lifestyles: Bringing Structure Back: William C. Cockerham (University of Alabama)

9. Social Capital and Health: Lijun Song (Vanderbilt University), Joonmo Son (National University of Singapore), and Nan Lin (Duke University)

10. Medicalization, Social Control, and the Relief of Suffering: Joseph E. Davis (University of Virginia)

11. Stress: William R. Avison (University of Western Ontario) and Stephanie S. Thomas (University of Western Ontario)

12. Stress in the Workplace: Johannes Siegrist (University of Düsseldorf)

Part IV: Health and Disease:

13. Emerging Infectious Diseases, Urbanization, and Globalization in the Time of Global Warming: George J. Armelagos (Emory University) and Kristin N. Harper (Columbia University)

14. Chronic Illness: Kathy Charmaz (Sonoma State University) and Dana Rosenfeld (University of Keele) 

Part V: Health Care Delivery:

15. Health Professions and Occupations: Elianne Riska (University of Helsinki)

16. Challenges to the Doctor–Patient Relationship in the Twenty-First Century: Jennifer Vanderminden (University of New Hampshire) and Sharyn J. Potter (University of New Hampshire)

17. Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Processes of Legitimation, Professionalization, and Cooption: Hans A. Baer (University of Melbourne)

18. The American Health Care System: Beginning the Twenty-First Century with High Risk, Major Challenges, and Great Opportunities: Bernice A. Pescosolido (Indiana University) and Carol A. Boyer (Rutgers University)

19. The British Health Care System: Michael Bury (University of London)

20. The Convergence and Divergence of Modern Health Care Systems: Fred Stevens (University of Maastricht)

21. Social Policies and Health Inequalities: Amélie Quesnel-Vallée (McGill University) and Tania Jenkins (McGill University)

Part VI: New Developments:

22. A Sociological Gaze on Bioethics: Kristina Orfali (Columbia University) and Raymond G. DeVries (University of Michigan Medical School)

23. Medical Sociology and Genetics: Paul A. Martin (University of Nottingham) and Robert Dingwall (University of Nottingham)

24. New Developments in Neuroscience and Medical Sociology: Simon J. Williams (University of Warwick)

Author Index

Subject Index

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Preface

The field of medical sociology has undergone considerable change since the first edition of this textbook appeared in 1978. At that time, much of the research in medical sociology was dependent upon the sponsorship of physicians, and a clear division of labor existed between sociologists working in academic departments in universities and those working in health institutions. Today, that situation has changed drastically. Medical sociology is no longer highly dependent on the medical profession for funding or focus—although a strong alliance continues to exist in many cases. Medical sociologists exercise their craft in an increasingly independent manner, either working with a greater degree of partnership with health care professionals or functioning as medicine's critics should the situation warrant it. Furthermore, research and teaching in medical sociology in both universities and health institutions are increasingly similar in the application of theory and usefulness in addressing problems relevant to clinical practice. In sum, medical sociology has evolved into a mature, objective, and independent field of study and work.

Medical sociology has also experienced significant growth worldwide in numbers of practitioners. In many countries, including the United States, Canada, Australia, Great Britain, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, and Singapore, medical sociologists are either the largest or one of the largest specialty groups in sociology. The European Society for Health and Medical Sociology is a large and active professional society, as are the medical sociology sections of the American, British, and German sociological associations. In 1999, the Americanand British medical sociology sections held their first joint meeting at London University's Royal Holloway College. Elsewhere, the Japanese Society of Health and Medical Sociology is working to further develop the field in its nation, while medical sociologists in Latin America hold regional conferences on a regular basis and have their own Spanish-language journals.

Numerous books, journals, college and university courses, medical programs, and lecture series in medical sociology now exist in different parts of the world. This textbook, for example, has been translated into Chinese by Yang Hui and Zhang Tuohong of Beijing Medical University and published by Huaxia Publishing House in Beijing. In the United States, several universities offer specialties in medical sociology, while two universities, the University of Alabama at Birmingham and the University of California at San Francisco—both with large medical campuses—offer doctorates in medical sociology. Columbia University in New York City offers a combined Ph.D. program in sociology and public health, while medical sociology has traditionally been the major focus in sociology departments at the University of Kentucky and the University of Miami (Florida). Additionally, there are departments of social medicine, which include medical sociologists, at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as well as McGill University in Montreal.

The principal goal of this textbook since its inception has been to introduce students to medical sociology by presenting the ideas, concepts, themes, theories, and research findings in the field. This edition—the eighth—continues this approach. The intent is to identify and discuss the most current issues, debates, and findings in medical sociology.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The material contained in the pages of this book is my own responsibility in terms of perspective, scope, and style of presentation. Nevertheless, I am deeply grateful to several people for their assistance in preparing the eight editions of this book. I would like to acknowledge the insightful comments of those colleagues who reviewed all or part of this work throughout the revision process. For sharing their views and helping to improve the quality of this book, my appreciation goes to Melvin Barber, Florida A&M University; Paul Berzina, County College of Morris; Deirdre Bowen, University of Washington; Herbert Bynder, University of Colorado; Robert Clark, Midwestern State University; John Collette, University of Utah; Spencer Condie, Brigham Young University; Morton Creditor, University of Kansas Medical Center; Norman Denzin, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Karen A. Donahue, Hanover College; Barry Edmonston, Cornell University; Eliot Freidson, New York University; Reed Geertsen, Utah State University; Sharon Guten, Case Western Reserve University; Joseph Jones, Portland State University; Daniel J. Klenow, North Dakota State University; Sol Levine, Harvard University and the New England Medical Center; Richard C. Ludtke, University of North Dakota; Robert Terry Russell, College of St. Francis; Alexander Rysman, Northeastern University; Jeffrey Salloway, University of New Hampshire; Anne Saunders, College of St. Francis; Neil Smelser, Center for the Advanced Study of the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford; and George J. Warheit, University of Miami (Florida). I would also like to thank three doctoral students in medical sociology at UAB who provided important assistance in the preparation of this edition: Sara Daum, Chris Snead, and Garrison Thompson.

William C. Cockerham
Birmingham, Alabama

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