New Day in Babylon: The Black Power Movement and American Culture, 1965-1975

New Day in Babylon: The Black Power Movement and American Culture, 1965-1975

by William L. Van Deburg
     
 

The most comprehensive account available of the rise and fall of the Black Power Movement and of its dramatic transformation of both African-American and larger American culture. With a gift for storytelling and an ear for street talk, William Van Deburg chronicles a decade of deep change, from the armed struggles of the Black Panther party to the cultural

Overview


The most comprehensive account available of the rise and fall of the Black Power Movement and of its dramatic transformation of both African-American and larger American culture. With a gift for storytelling and an ear for street talk, William Van Deburg chronicles a decade of deep change, from the armed struggles of the Black Panther party to the cultural nationalism of artists and writers creating a new aesthetic. Van Deburg contends that although its tactical gains were sometimes short-lived, the Black Power movement did succeed in making a revolution—one in culture and consciousness—that has changed the context of race in America.

"New Day in Babylon is an extremely intelligent synthesis, a densely textured evocation of one of American history's most revolutionary transformations in ethnic group consciousness."—Bob Blauner, New York Times

Winner of the Gustavus Myers Center Outstanding Book Award, 1993

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Van Deburg (Afro-American studies, U. of Wisconsin, Madison) does a great service by documenting and interpreting a decade of deep change. Those who seek a course for the future would do well to study the voices of that period's political and cultural explosion. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Mary Carroll
Van Deburg, who teaches African American studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, presents the U.S. Black Power movement as "a revolutionary cultural concept . . . [which encouraged] black Americans . . . [to] define and establish their own values while rejecting the cultural prescriptions of their oppressors." With Malcolm X as "a Black Power paradigm," young activists disillusioned with integration and nonviolence and seeking a solid basis for African American self-esteem and unity made new demands: on campus, in sports, within the labor movement, and inside "total institutions" like prisons and the armed forces. Van Deburg outlines the competition between pluralism and nationalism for ideological dominance and the ways the new movement found expression in "the visual, linguistic, and culinary arts, [as well as in] folklore, music, and religion." He discusses the impact of black culture on the nation's literary and artistic culture. In its insistence that "the Black Power movement brought irrevocable changes in Afro-Americans' attitudes both about themselves and about the legitimacy of the white world order," "New Day in Babylon" is a well-written, well-documented corrective to studies that concentrate exclusively on the movement's limited political and economic gains.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780226847146
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
Publication date:
11/28/1992
Edition description:
1
Pages:
388
Product dimensions:
6.23(w) x 9.23(h) x 1.17(d)

Meet the Author


Prior to his retirement, William L. Van Deburg was the Evjue-Bascom Professor of Afro-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His previous books include New Day in Babylon: The Black Power Movement and American Culture, 1965-1975 and Black Camelot: African-American Culture Heroes in Their Times, 1960-1980, both published by the University of Chicago Press.

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