New Directions In Language Development And Disorders

Overview

This book is the proceedings of the Child Language Seminar, held 4-6 September 1998, in Sheffield, UK.
The book aims to provide an up-to-date overview of current research into child language development and disorders. Its 26 chapters, written by leading authorities around the world, address many of the key issues which are currently exercising the minds of child language researchers, and which are likely to motivate research for some time to ...

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Paperback (Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 2000)
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Overview

This book is the proceedings of the Child Language Seminar, held 4-6 September 1998, in Sheffield, UK.
The book aims to provide an up-to-date overview of current research into child language development and disorders. Its 26 chapters, written by leading authorities around the world, address many of the key issues which are currently exercising the minds of child language researchers, and which are likely to motivate research for some time to come.
A key theme of the book is the nature of language acquisition in children whose learning capacity is in some way impaired, and what this can tell us about language development more generally. The main topics covered are: cross-linguistic perspectives on language acquisition; the relationship between innate linguistic capacity and the specific properties of the language being acquired; syntax; argument structure; verbs and verb morphology; phonology; pragmatics and discourse; and literacy.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781461368656
  • Publisher: Springer US
  • Publication date: 4/30/2013
  • Edition description: Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 2000
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 303
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.67 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface. 1. Normal and Abnormal Language Development: Common Ground? Theories of language learning and children with specific language impairment; L.B. Leonard. The relevance of recent research on SLI to our understanding of normal language development; G. Conti-Ramsden. Time parsing, normal language acquisition, and language-related developmental disorders; J. Boucher. How optional is 'optional' in the Extended Optional Infinitive stage? K. Brunger, A. Henry. Derivational morphology in SLI children: structure and semantics of Hebrew nouns; D. Ravid, et al. Speech monitoring in retarded children: evidence for metalinguistic competencies; Y. Levy, et al. Gesture use by two children with tracheostomy: getting ready to use words; M. Kertoy, A. Morrison. 2. Language Universals and Language Specifics. Three hypotheses on early grammatical development; M Garman, et al. Could a Chomskyan child learn Polish? The logical argument for language learning; E. Dabrowska. On the acquisition of pronominal reference in child-Greek; S. Varlokosta, et al. The emergence of periphrastic questions in child-French; B. Plunkett. 3. Argument Structure. The role of performance limitations in the acquisition of 'mixed' verb-argument structure at Stage I; A.L. Theakston, et al. Argument structure preferences in pre-school and school-age children; R. Ingham, et al. Argument structure alternation in French children's speech; I. Barriere, et al. 4. Verbs and Verb Morphology. Lexically-specified patterns in early verbal morphology in Spanish; V.C. Mueller Gathercole, et al. Infants of 24-30 months understand verb frames ; E.L. Bavin, C. Growcott. Morphological future in Italian children; C. Bazzanella, C. Bosco. Cross-linguistic developmental evidence of implicit causality in visual perception and cognition verbs; F. Franco, et al. What they hear is what you get? Infinitives and modality in child language and child-directed speech; E. Blom, et al. 5. Phonology. An experimental and computational exploration of developmental patterns in lexical access and representation; T. Loucas, W.D. Marslen-Wilson. Learning to produce three-syllable words: a longitudinal study of Finnish twins; T. Savinainen-Makkonen. The acquisition of the systematic use of pitch by German /English bilingual children: evidence for two separate phonological systems; U. Gut. 6. Pragmatics and Discourse. Acquisition of sentence-final particles in Japanese; J. Shirai, et al. Cohesion and coherence anomalies and their effects on children's referent introduction in narrative retell; M. Hickmann, P. Schneider. 7. Literacy. The cognitive determinants of literacy skills in a regular orthography; D. Nikoloulos, N. Goulandris. Social class does not predict reading success, but language and metalinguistic skills do; C. Chaney. Do children with literacy difficulties have non-native-like CVC perception? N. Thyer, et al. Index.

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