New Economy Handbook

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Overview

The New Economy Handbook will primarily serve reference users in business schools, economics departments, public and university libraries, special libraries, and institutions/agencies concerned with finance, trade, e-commerce, banking, and other regulatory, trade, and commercial activities. Secondary users will be business professionals and managers, as well as entrepreneurs, bankers, and others who need traditional economic information and data about new technology firms. Because of the scope of its table of contents, the book might well be used as a supplement to many courses.

The revolutions that brought about the New Economy are quietly embedded in familiar, old products, not necessarily ringing, beeping, and vibrating next to our skins. Why is the bulky, battery-operated e-book the new economy, while Lockheed-Martin's swooping F-16 is consigned to the Old Economy?

The information technology boom of the 1990s stoked a New Economy characterized by surging output per worker but with hard-to-measure and vulnerable underpinnings. Faster productivity is, of course, the key to higher living standards. The most important aspect of the New Economy might not, therefore, be the shift to high-tech industries, but the way that Information Technology improves the efficiency of all parts of the economy.

This collection of original essays offers the first thorough investigation of the New Economy. Its poignancy is even more apparent in the wake of the 1990s technology bubble. Articles share a format that encourages accessibilty, including an outline, glossary, and summary, and an extensive index adds utility. Written for students and scholars seeking authoritativedata and perspectives.

Audience: This book will primarily serve reference users in business schools, economics departments, public and university libraries, special libraries, and institutions/agencies concerned with finance, trade, e-commerce, banking, and other regulatory, trade, and commercial activities. Secondary users will be business professionals and managers, as well as entrepreneurs, bankers, and others who need traditional economic information and data about new technology firms. Because of the scope of its table of contents, the book might well be used as a supplement to many courses.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780123891723
  • Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing Limited
  • Publication date: 9/15/2003
  • Pages: 1118
  • Product dimensions: 6.36 (w) x 9.22 (h) x 2.09 (d)

Meet the Author

Derek Jones has been a member of the faculty at Hamilton College for more than 25 years. He has been a Research Fellow at the Davidson Institute, Visiting Professor at the London Business School, Visiting Scholar at Cambridge University, Research Fellow at Manchester University and Warwick University, and Visiting Fellow at Copenhagen Business School, the Arbetslivcentrum (Stockholm) and the European University Institute (Florence)
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Table of Contents

Contributors
Preface
Introduction
Sect. I The New Economy: Meaning, Measurement, and Stylized Facts
Ch. 1 A Statistical Portrait of the New Economy
Ch. 2 The New Economy in Historical Perspective: Evolution of Digital Electronics Technology
Ch. 3 Data Issues in the New Economy
Ch. 4 The Adoption and Diffusion of ICT Across Countries: Patterns and Determinants
Ch. 5 Information Technology and Productivity Growth Across Countries and Sectors
Sect. II Product Markets and Industrial Organization
Ch. 6 Auction Theory for the New Economy
Ch. 7 Cyberspace Auctions and Pricing Issues: A Review of Empirical Findings
Ch. 8 Internet and Pricing Issues: Relationship of Prices Charged by Fixed Price Vendors in Cyberspace and Those in Bricks and Mortar Stores
Ch. 9 Information Technology and Productivity Gains and Cost Savings in Companies
Ch. 10 Adoption of New Technology
Ch. 11 Is an Action the Best Market Mechanism for Digital Goods?
Ch. 12 The Implications of the New Economy for Industrial Location
Ch. 13 Digital Goods and the New Economy
Ch. 14 The Economics of Automated E-Commerce
Ch. 15 The New Economy and Networking
Sect. III Financial Markets
Ch. 16 The New Economy: Implications for the Organization and Structure of Securities Markets
Ch. 17 The New Economy: Pricing of Equity Securities
Ch. 18 The New Economy and Banks and Financial Institutions
Ch. 19 E-Money and Payment Systems
Ch. 20 Accounting Issues in the New Economy
Ch. 21 New Electronic Trading Systems in Foreign Exchange Markets
Sect. IV Labor Markets
Ch. 22 The Internet and Matching in Labor Markets
Ch. 23 Who Uses Computers and In What Ways: Effects on the Earnings Distribution
Ch. 24 The New Economy and the Organization of Work
Ch. 25 Skill-Based Technology Change in the New Economy
Ch. 26 The New Economy and the Impact of Immigration and the Brain Drain
Ch. 27 The New Economy and Forms of Compensation
Sect. V Entrepreneurship
Ch. 28 The Regional Origins of the New Economy
Ch. 29 Venture Capital in the New Economy
Ch. 30 Business Models in the New Economy
Sect. VI Macroeconomics and Growth
Ch. 31 Growth and Innovation in the New Economy
Ch. 32 International Productivity Convergence in the New Economy: More or Less Likely?
Ch. 33 The New Economy and Business Cycles
Sect. VII Policy and Institutional Framework
Ch. 34 Macro Policy-Making in the New Economy
Ch. 35 The Digital Divide and What to Do About It
Ch. 36 Property Rights in the New Economy
Ch. 37 Taxation and the New Economy
Ch. 38 Regulation and the New Economy
Ch. 39 Privacy and Security Issues in E-Commerce
Ch. 40 Policy Issues and the New Economy for Developing and Transition Economies
Ch. 41 The New Economy and International Trade
Ch. 42 The Rationales for Intellectual Property Rights in the Electronic Age
Ch. 43 International Governance of the Internet: An Economic Analysis
Ch. 44 E-Learning
Ch. 45 Trust in the New Economy
Index
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