The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Volume 11: Agriculture and Industry

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, Volume 11: Agriculture and Industry

by Melissa Walker
     
 

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Volume 11 of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture examines the economic culture of the South by pairing two categories that account for the ways many southerners have made their living. In the antebellum period, the wealth of southern whites came largely from agriculture that relied on the forced labor of enslaved blacks. After Reconstruction, the South…  See more details below

Overview

Volume 11 of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture examines the economic culture of the South by pairing two categories that account for the ways many southerners have made their living. In the antebellum period, the wealth of southern whites came largely from agriculture that relied on the forced labor of enslaved blacks. After Reconstruction, the South became attractive to new industries lured by the region's ongoing commitment to low-wage labor and management-friendly economic policies. Throughout the volume, articles reflect the breadth and variety of southern life, paying particular attention to the region's profound economic transformation in recent decades.

The agricultural section consists of 25 thematic entries that explore issues such as Native American agricultural practices, plantations, and sustainable agriculture. Thirty-eight shorter pieces cover key crops of the region--from tobacco to Christmas trees--as well as issues of historic and emerging interest--from insects and insecticides to migrant labor. The section on industry and commerce contains 13 thematic entries in which contributors address topics such as the economic impact of military bases, resistance to industrialization, and black business. Thirty-six topical entries explore particular industries, such as textiles, timber, automobiles, and banking, as well as individuals--including Henry W. Grady and Sam M. Walton--whose ideas and enterprises have helped shape the modern South.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Excellent. . . . A volume both handy to consult and enjoyable to read.--NC Historical Review

Walker's impressive essay succinctly moves from colonial and antebellum planters, yeomen, and slaves to postwar tenancy, boll weevils, and government programs before concluding with the rise of agribusiness in recent decades. . . . Researchers of southern culture will find this volume a useful starting point.--West Virginia History

Remarkably well done, a worthwhile endeavor deserving of the praise it is certain to elicit.--The Alabama Review

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780807859094
Publisher:
The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date:
11/01/2008
Series:
New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture Series
Edition description:
1
Pages:
376
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.90(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture provide[s] wonderful insight into the history and culture of the American South. By publishing the encyclopedia in multiple volumes, the editors have helped make this rich resource more readily available to the reading public. Future volumes . . . will be highly anticipated.--North Carolina Historical Review

This set represents a solid improvement on a celebrated work. The individual volumes will be essential for scholars of various Southern studies topics.--Library Journal

A relaxed yet meticulous prose style suits these eclectic topics. The authors have taken a laid-back attitude, spreading their project over 28 proposed volumes, and ignoring the temptation to cram too much into each book. That's an appropriate decision for an enlightening guide to the mythology and beliefs of the sultry South.--Post and Courier (Charleston, SC)

Meet the Author

Melissa Walker is George Dean Johnson Jr. Professor of History at Converse College.

James C. Cobb is B. Phinizy Spalding Distinguished Professor in the History of the American South at the University of Georgia.

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