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New England Breakfast Breads, Luncheon and Tea Biscuits

Overview

NEW ENGLAND BREAKFAST BREADS LUNCHEON AND TEA BlSCUlTS BY LUCIA GRAY S,WETT BOSTON MDCCCXCI LEE AND SHEPAKI PIJRLISHERS IO XILK STREET NEXT 1118 ILU S01 111 3Ll6bIIXC. HUCSE NEW POKK CHARLES T. DILLINGHAX 718 AXD 70 BXODWAY Nrw hhGL4.s BIIPAKFAST RRAU. CONTENTS AGE . . 3 . . 3 . 8 . 8 . . 9 . . I0 . . 13 . . 16 . . 7 20 . . 22 . . 2 3 . . 24 . . 2 5 iii PXiiH LEXIXGTON RISCUIT OR I.VICII IoI,I.s, 37 TLA ROLI.S . . . . . . . . . . 29 Rotts OR POCKET-Uooss . . . . . 31 FI.ANSRL ROLLS . . . . . . . . 33 SALLY Luxs ....
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Overview

NEW ENGLAND BREAKFAST BREADS LUNCHEON AND TEA BlSCUlTS BY LUCIA GRAY S,WETT BOSTON MDCCCXCI LEE AND SHEPAKI PIJRLISHERS IO XILK STREET NEXT 1118 ILU S01 111 3Ll6bIIXC. HUCSE NEW POKK CHARLES T. DILLINGHAX 718 AXD 70 BXODWAY Nrw hhGL4.s BIIPAKFAST RRAU. CONTENTS AGE . . 3 . . 3 . 8 . 8 . . 9 . . I0 . . 13 . . 16 . . 7 20 . . 22 . . 2 3 . . 24 . . 2 5 iii PXiiH LEXIXGTON RISCUIT OR I.VICII IoI,I.s, 37 TLA ROLI.S . . . . . . . . . . 29 Rotts OR POCKET-Uooss . . . . . 31 FI.ANSRL ROLLS . . . . . . . . 33 SALLY Luxs . . . . . . . . . 34 FEATHER UISCUT . . . . . . . 35 UIIEAKFAST MUFFINS WITII YEAST . 36 illuras RAKED on TIIE Gnrrnte . 37 SYOW CAKES . . . . . . . . . 3s CASTLE CAKES . . . . . . . . 39 HKEAKFAST MUFFINS ...... 40 RICE MUFFINS . . . . . . . . . 4-1 BRE.KF.ST CAKE . . . . . . 42 COTTAGE CAKES . . . . . . 43 CONTENTS CONTENTS CONTENTS PACE r 06 107 107 09 09 I I0 I I0 I I0 111 TIT 1 I1 I12 113 114 vi PREFATORY DIRECTIONS NEAKI-Y all these recipes llave bccn in one New England family several years, many of them half a centliry. There are only a few exceptions, and these I have carefill tried. If the directions seem too explicit, it is because I have tried to word the recipes so that they could be rlnderstooc1 by a young housekeeper or made by my one not experienced in cookilg. YEAST AND YEAST BREAD HOME-MADE yeast I prefer to yeast cakcs, but there are a few kinds of bread, as the Lunch Rolls. Sweet Rusks, and Runns, which are better made with yeast cakes, but. althorgh they are convenient, especially on account of rising so quickly, I think homemade yeast is preferable and tise it, in both summer and winter, made by the first 3 recipe in the book. If there is any trolble in keeping the yeast sweet in war111 weather, it can be made with fewer potatoes - three instead of four. The new, that is the early potatoes, are not dry or mealy enough to make good yeast. I hare tried the recipes and given the111 with both home-made yeast and yeast cakes. By yeast cakes I always mean the little two-cent cakes of compressed yeast. slicb as are generally used. He carefcl not to dissolve them in too hot water or milk. or it will take the life out of the yeast and the hrcad will not rise well. Care should be taken also to get them perfectly fresh, and, if kept at all, to cover them carefully and keep them in the ice-chest or cellar. Dissolve the yeast cake in the same quantity of warm milk or water that would he taken of home-made yeast. If the bread is made with milk it is generally better to dissolve it in milk. Always warm the milk to be used in making bread with yeast. The best way is to put it in a tin quart measure, and set it in a pan of hot water on the stove. Of course the milk should be only just lrkewarm when added to the dough, but it is hetter, especially in srllnrner, to let it get quite hot, and then leave it in a pan of cold water until just luke- warm before using, as this prevents the dough from souring. Always be very careful that the milk is perfectly sweet, and if. bread is mixed in the evening, never use milk brought the day before. 3,lilk that has been skimmed is rather better for raised loaves, d and makes thc bread whiter, and with the shortenin used is quite rich enorlgh. Bread made with yeast cakes requires more salt than that made with home-made yeast - nearly half as much again. If the bread is mixed with watcr instead of milk. have thc watcr jrlst lukewarm. If the quantity of milk given in the recipes scelns a great deal in proportion to the quantity of Aour usecl, it is because the brcadr were made with very fine dry flour, and if moister flour shorld be used of course it would not stiffen as much and would require less milk,or water, although bread is rnrlcll nicer when the dough is kneaded quite soft, and a grcat deal of bread is spoiled hy being made too stiff...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781407792576
  • Publisher: HardPress Publishing
  • Publication date: 1/10/2012
  • Pages: 144
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.31 (d)

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