New England Soup Factory Cookbook: More Than 100 Recipes from the Nation's Best Purveyor of Fine Soup

New England Soup Factory Cookbook: More Than 100 Recipes from the Nation's Best Purveyor of Fine Soup

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by Marjorie Druker, Clara Silverstein
     
 

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The New England Soup Factory restaurant has won the Best of Boston award four times. The New England Soup Factory Cookbook contains 100 of Boston's best-tasting traditional and creative soup recipes. The book also includes a chapter on sandwiches and salads.See more details below

Overview

The New England Soup Factory restaurant has won the Best of Boston award four times. The New England Soup Factory Cookbook contains 100 of Boston's best-tasting traditional and creative soup recipes. The book also includes a chapter on sandwiches and salads.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Druker, executive chef and co-owner of the Massachusetts eatery New England Soup Factory, joins veteran Boston-based food writer Silverstein to weave personal stories of the region with mouthwatering recipes in this instant classic, a must-have for soup lovers. Standards like Beef and Barley, Split Pea with Bacon and Potatoes, and Hot and Sour Soup sit comfortably next to innovative combinations such as Butternut Squash Soup with Calvados, Gorgonzola Cheese and Prosciutto, or Yellow Tomato Soup with Jasmine Rice. Aside from the stock making, which Druker and Silverstein heartily endorse, most of the soups and accompanying sides come together in minutes, producing a quick, hearty meal that few dishes can match for sheer satisfaction. Many recipes highlight just a handful of ingredients (Roasted Yellow Beet and Pear Soup with Blue Cheese; Sweet and Sour Cabbage Soup with Dill; Apple, Onion and Cheddar Soup) and call for little else, keeping recipes simple, costs low and flavors bold. Recipes are grouped intuitively by theme (cheese, chicken, chowders, etc.) as well as by season, ensuring that the perfect bowl of soup is never far away. (Sept.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781401603007
Publisher:
Nelson, Thomas, Inc.
Publication date:
09/11/2007
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
185,604
Product dimensions:
7.90(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.90(d)

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Read an Excerpt

New England Soup Factory Cookbook


By Marjorie Druker, Clara Silverstein, Ron Manville

Thomas Nelson

Copyright © 2007 Marjorie Druker and Clara Silverstein
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4185-7222-8



CHAPTER 1

Taking Stock


Inseparable from every good soup is a good stock. In this age of hurry-up cooking, it may seem like too much bother to make your own, but your own stock gives your soup a head start on flavor. It adds body and a complex, savory element before you even put the first ingredient into the pot. My stock recipes are simple enough to make in an afternoon. You don't need to fuss over dicing the vegetables into perfect-looking cubes, as they will be strained out. Once the pot is simmering on the stove, you can walk away and do something else for awhile.

Once the stock is strained, let it cool for two hours at room temperature and then refrigerate. As you transfer the stock from the pot, measure it out by the cupful, and label the container so you will know exactly how much you have on hand for any soup. These stocks should all keep for up to three days in the refrigerator.

To freeze a stock, refrigerate it first, then place it in a freezer-safe container. Resealable plastic bags are handy for storing stocks, as they take up less room than traditional plastic containers.

If you are really pressed for time, stock from a can or box will get you through the recipe, but the flavor will be compromised a bit.


When I was eighteen years old, I took a job in the kitchen of Camp Tevya, the summer camp in New Hampshire that I had attended. I already knew that I wanted to go to culinary school, and I needed to help pay for the tuition. Being a third cook was not nearly as fun as being a camper. We fed 450 people three meals a day, plus snacks. Seven days a week, we worked from 5:00 a.m. until 7:30 p.m. I got a two-hour break after we cleaned up from lunch. It was just enough time for a small nap before I had to go back and set up for dinner.

This was without a doubt one of the most grueling jobs that I had ever taken. I was the only female in the kitchen, and the chefs either yelled at me or made fun of me. Each morning I had to go into the slop house to bring out the discarded food for the local farmers to feed their animals. I burned my hands on the Fryolater and had six blisters with bubbles. Once, I even cut myself and needed to get stitches. Whenever I called home, I complained nonstop to my dad. Through it all, he steadfastly refused to let me come home. "Johnson & Wales does not accept quitters into their school," he said.

Since Tevya is a Jewish camp, the biggest and most important meal of the entire week was the Shabbat on Friday evening. We always served chicken soup, and it was my job to prep all of the vegetables. I would start by peeling a fifty-pound bag of onions, then fifty pounds of carrots, which turned my hands bright orange. Then I would wash and trim a whole case of celery. The final step was placing two huge cases of chicken wings into an eighty-gallon kettle, adding the vegetables, and letting it simmer all day. The smell of chicken soup wafted throughout the camp as anticipation built for this important—and popular—meal.

When I look back on this part of my life, I realize that it gave me the right foundation, not only for making gigantic batches of chicken soup, but for succeeding in my chosen profession. I am now grateful that my father made me stay. Just because a job seems too difficult doesn't mean we should walk away and not challenge ourselves. It is through hard work and determination that we learn how to best cope with situations that are not easy, and to keep moving towards our goals.


Clear and Rich Chicken Stock

If you only make one stock from scratch, it should be chicken. For chicken soups, of course, it is absolutely essential. It also seems to miraculously absorb whatever flavors are in the pot, so it can be used in place of beef or fish stock.

6 pounds chicken backs, wings, and/or thighs
3 large Spanish onions, peeled and cut into quarters
6 ribs celery, cut into thirds
6 carrots, peeled and cut into thirds
½ bunch fresh parsley
2 bay leaves
4 chicken bouillon cubes
16 cups water, plus more as needed Kosher salt, to taste


* In a large stockpot place the chicken, onions, celery, carrots, parsley, bay leaves, bouillon, water, and salt. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Skim and discard the foam that rises to the top of the pot. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer gently for 3 hours, adding 1 to 2 cups of water if the stock reduces too much. Strain through a colander and discard the solids. Let cool and refrigerate up to 4 days. When the stock is cold, skim off and discard the fat from the top.

Makes 12 cups


Chicken stock becomes even more useful when you freeze it in ice cube trays. When you're making a dish that needs last-minute enrichment, add one of the frozen cubes. It will melt right in and fortify the dish with more intensity and depth. This works really well for gravies, stews, meats, and even marinara sauce. For a shortcut, commercially prepared chicken broth may be used in place of chicken stock.


Fragrant Fish Stock

This stock comes together in about an hour. If you let it simmer too long, it can get bitter. Fish bones can be requested from a fishmonger. Ask for mild flavored fish such as haddock or cod; salmon might add too strong a flavor.

6 pounds fish bones or shrimp shells
2 large onions, peeled and cut into quarters
6 ribs celery, cut into thirds
4 parsnips, peeled and cut into large pieces
4 whole cloves garlic, peeled
2 bay leaves
1 bunch fresh parsley
1½ tablespoons whole peppercorns
2 cups Chablis
½ fresh lemon
8 cups water Kosher salt, to taste


* In a stockpot, add the fish bones, onions, celery, parsnips, garlic, bay leaves, parsley, peppercorns, Chablis, lemon, water, and salt. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium high and simmer for 35 to 40 minutes. Carefully strain the stock through a fine mesh colander or a regular colander lined with cheesecloth. Let cool and refrigerate up to 3 days before using.

Makes 8 cups

Canned clam juice makes a quick substitute for fish stock.


Lobster Stock

Lobster stock is one of my favorite ingredients because it's so potent and adds the distinct flavor of lobster to seafood soups. Once you boil the lobsters and separate the meat from the shells, the stock comes together easily. For once, you don't have to discard the shells.

3 lobsters (1½ pounds each)
1 large Spanish onion, peeled and cut into quarters
3 ribs celery, cut into thirds
3 carrots, peeled and cut into thirds
1½ cups dry white wine or vermouth
1 can (6 ounces) tomato paste
6 to 8 sprigs fresh parsley Kosher salt, to taste
3 bay leaves
8 to 10 whole peppercorns Water, as needed


* Fill an 8 to 10-quart pot with water. Bring to a boil over high heat. Drop the lobsters into the pot. Boil for 8 to 10 minutes. Remove from the pot and let cool until they can be handled. Remove the meat from the shells and refrigerate the meat until ready to use. Reserve the lobster shells and bodies.

* In a stockpot place the lobster shells, onion, celery, carrots, wine, tomato paste, parsley, salt, bay leaves, and peppercorns. Add enough water to cover the lobster shells by 3 inches. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium high and simmer 1 1/4 hours, adding 1 to 2 cups of water if the stock reduces too much. Strain through a fine mesh strainer or sieve or a regular colander lined with cheesecloth. Discard the solids. Let cool and refrigerate up to 3 days before using.

Makes 10 cups


This is the only recipe I can think of that places more importance on the lobster shells than on the meat inside. You can feast right away on the lobster meat, and then make the stock, or refrigerate the meat for later use in a salad or a soup recipe, such as Pumpkin, Lobster, and Ginger Soup (see page 136).


Meaty Beef Stock

Beef stock is one of more complicated, time-consuming stocks to prepare, but it yields a tremendous return. It starts with beef bones that are oven-roasted with vegetables to bring out their flavor. The stock also has lots of body, making it a perfect base for beef stew, onion soup, and gravy. It's a perfect project for a snowy day, when you can't leave the house anyway.

6 to 7 pounds beef bones or knuckles
2 large onions, peeled and cut into quarters
6 carrots, peeled and cut into thirds
4 ribs celery, cut into thirds
1 can (6 ounces) tomato paste
5 whole cloves garlic, peeled
1 tablespoon whole peppercorns
2 bay leaves
4 beef bouillon cubes
¼ bunch fresh parsley
16 cups water, plus more as needed Kosher salt, to taste


* Preheat the oven to 450 degrees. In a 13 × 9-inch roasting pan place the beef bones, onions, carrots, and celery. Using a pastry brush, brush the tomato paste over the bones and vegetables. Bake for 40 minutes, or until the bones and vegetables turn brown and a bit caramelized.

* Transfer the contents of the roasting pan into a stockpot. Add the garlic, peppercorns, bay leaves, bouillon, parsley, water, and salt. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer for 4 hours, adding 1 to 2 cups of water if the stock reduces too much. Strain through a colander and discard the solids. Let cool and refrigerate up to 3 days before using. When the stock is cold, skim off and discard the fat from the top.

Makes 12 cups


Ask for bones from a butcher or from the meat department at a supermarket. You can also use leftovers from a standing rib roast. Store the bones you plan to use in the freezer until you find the time to make the stock.


Vegetable Stock

Vegetable stocks tend to have less texture than other stocks, as vegetables contain no fat or natural thickeners, such as the collagen found in bones. With a combination of garlic, onions, leeks, and fennel, this stock is a good start for a vegetarian soup. The soup itself can then be fortified with tomatoes or butternut squash for texture, and plenty of fresh herbs for flavor.

2 tablespoons olive oil
4 whole cloves garlic, peeled
2 large Spanish onions, peeled and cut into quarters
2 leeks, washed well and sliced
6 ribs celery, cut into thirds
8 carrots, peeled and cut into thirds
3 parsnips, peeled and cut into thirds
1 bulb fennel, cut into quarters
14 cups water
4 to 6 vegetable bouillon cubes
2 bay leaves
1 tablespoon whole peppercorns


* Heat a stockpot over medium-high heat and add the olive oil. Add the garlic, onions, leeks, celery, carrots, parsnips, and fennel. Sauté for 10 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the water, bouillon, bay leaves, and peppercorns. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer for 45 minutes. Strain through a fine mesh colander or a regular colander lined with cheesecloth. Discard the solids. Cool to room temperature and refrigerate until ready to use.

Makes 8 cups


First Things First

In generations past, clam broth or consommé made a classy first-course soup, especially when served in bowls set atop monogrammed silver bases. Today's more adventurous appetites call for something less European at the start of a meal. The soups in this chapter are designed to help launch any number of occasions, from a cozy night at home to an elegant holiday dinner. Each one is worthy of its position as the opener for a multi-course meal. Don't expect these soups to stand in for an entrée. They are supposed to whet your appetite and leave you wanting more.

My father was a carpet salesman whose clients included many of the finest hotels around Boston and New England. He seemed to know everyone in the hotel business, and he worked hard at building good relationships with the buyers. Sometimes, he would bring his best clients home for dinner. We learned at an early age how to entertain graciously and make good conversation. When Victor, a buyer from the Sheraton, accepted our dinner invitation, my father was pleased, but also nervous. Dad let us know that Victor was accustomed to eating at fine restaurants, and that he really knew food. My mother suggested consommé because that is what a fine dining restaurant would serve as a first course. We made our own version with tiny cut vegetables. For dessert, we made white chocolate mousse with raspberry sauce. Mom and I thought we were the last word. When Victor called to thank my parents, he commented that he was impressed that we served consommé. This confirmed the success of Mom's strategy—to serve a lovely first-course soup to set the standard for the evening. A good first course inspires confidence that the rest of the meal will follow right along.


Potato-Watercress Soup

Folk wisdom says that watercress can activate a woman's labor. That must be why so many pregnant women stop by our Brookline store after their childbirth classes, held right next door. We enjoy following their progress. Some of these women have even stopped by the store in the throes of labor for their last bowl of soup before they head to the delivery room (how they can manage to eat at such a time, I can't imagine)! The best part is when they bring in their newborns. After that, their children become our customers, too. Just think, we have been feeding them all along!

2 tablespoons butter
1 large Spanish onion, peeled and diced
3 ribs celery, diced
3 whole cloves garlic, peeled
5 large Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into ¾-inch chunks
2 quarts chicken stock
2 bunches watercress
2 cups light cream
4 dashes Worcestershire sauce
3 dashes Tabasco sauce Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste


* In a stockpot melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the onion, celery, and garlic. Sauté for 5 to 7 minutes. Add the potatoes and pour in the chicken stock until the potatoes are submerged. Bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium high and simmer until the potatoes are tender, 30 to 35 minutes. Remove from the heat and add the watercress. Stir until wilted. Add the cream, Worcestershire sauce, Tabasco sauce, salt, and pepper. Puree the soup in the pot using a hand blender or working in batches with a regular blender until smooth. Return the pot to medium-high heat and simmer for an additional 3 minutes to warm through.

Makes 8 to 10 servings


Vidalia Onion Soup

It's hard to improve on French onion soup topped with melted cheese that almost magically turns into delicious, gooey strings when you lift a spoon. In this recipe, I wanted to leave the basic concept intact, but find a way to vary the ingredients. Vidalia onions—sometimes called the apple of onions because they are so crunchy and sweet—fit the bill. They grow in a particular area of Georgia, and are the state's official vegetable. When cooked slowly, their sweetness becomes even more pronounced, and they turn a lovely, deep mahogany color. I discovered that sautéing the onions for at least 35 to 40 minutes is the key to giving this soup its rich, slow-cooked flavor. Homey and comforting, this soup can lead off a cozy night at home.


Garlicky Croutons

1 French baguette, cut into 15 slices (about 1-inch thick each) 2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil 1½ teaspoons garlic powder ½ teaspoon onion powder ¼ teaspoon kosher salt 6 grinds of black pepper from a pepper mill

Soup

6 tablespoons salted butter 8 large Vidalia onions, peeled and sliced 3 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced 2 cups cream sherry, divided 3 tablespoons tomato paste 16 cups beef stock 2 bay leaves 1 tablespoon cornstarch dissolved in 3 tablespoons water 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 8 to 10 croutons 1½ to 2 cups grated Gruyère cheese


* For the garlicky croutons: Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a large mixing bowl toss the bread slices with the olive oil, garlic powder, onion powder, salt, and pepper until the seasonings are evenly distributed. Place on the baking sheet and bake for 8 minutes or until crunchy and hard. Remove from the oven and set aside until ready to use.

* For the soup: In a stockpot melt the butter over medium heat. Add the onions and sauté for 20 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the garlic and sauté 20 minutes more. Add 1 cup of the sherry. Deglaze the pan, stirring to loosen the cooked pieces on the bottom. Add the remaining 1 cup sherry, tomato paste, beef stock, and bay leaves. Increase the heat to medium-high and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer for 1 hour. Add the cornstarch-water mixture, increase the heat to high, and boil for 1 minute. Turn off the heat and season with the vinegar, salt, and pepper.

* Remove and discard the bay leaves.

* Preheat a broiler to high. Place the soup in an ovenproof casserole or individual crocks. Place the croutons on top of the soup and sprinkle the cheese on top. Broil until the cheese is bubbly and brown, about 3 minutes.

Makes 8 to 10 servings


(Continues...)

Excerpted from New England Soup Factory Cookbook by Marjorie Druker, Clara Silverstein, Ron Manville. Copyright © 2007 Marjorie Druker and Clara Silverstein. Excerpted by permission of Thomas Nelson.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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