New England Wildflowers: A Guide to Common Plants

Overview

New England Wildflowers is the most complete guide available to the common wildflowers and flowering plants found in Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. With habitats ranging from tidal marshes to mountains, bogs, and boreal forests, the region comprises a rich variety of botanical treasures. Botanists, naturalists, and wildflower enthusiasts alike will find much to enjoy and discover in this easy-to-use reference, which features:
• ...

See more details below
Paperback (First Edition)
$19.81
BN.com price
(Save 20%)$24.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (8) from $14.83   
  • New (6) from $14.83   
  • Used (2) from $14.98   
Sending request ...

Overview

New England Wildflowers is the most complete guide available to the common wildflowers and flowering plants found in Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. With habitats ranging from tidal marshes to mountains, bogs, and boreal forests, the region comprises a rich variety of botanical treasures. Botanists, naturalists, and wildflower enthusiasts alike will find much to enjoy and discover in this easy-to-use reference, which features:
• Guaranteed binding—if this binding fails, the publisher will replace the book for free
• Detailed descriptions and color photos of more than 300 plants, organized by color and family
• An introduction to the region’s habitats and ecology
• A glossary of botanical terms
• A primer on plant characteristics and identification

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780762748204
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 3/3/2009
  • Series: Wildflower Series
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 288
  • Sales rank: 774,771
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Frank Kaczmarek is a professional biologist whose nature photographs have appeared in Fall Foliage (FalconGuides), as well as numerous magazines and calendars. He resides in Connecticut.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

New England is known for its rapidly changing and highly diverse climate. In any given year the weather can range from severe snow and ice storms to summer heat waves and prolonged periods of drought. There are four major geographic factors that play key roles in controlling the region’s weather patterns. First, New England lies roughly halfway between the equator and the North Pole (from latitude 40o 58” N to 47o 28”N). This often results in moist, warm air from the south colliding with cooler and drier air from the north. Second, coastal orientation plays a factor. Cold ocean currents of the Atlantic flow along the eastern coast of Maine, New Hampshire and Massachusetts while warmer currents flow along the southern Connecticut and Rhode Island coast. Third, the topography of the region is highly variable ranging from flat coastal lowlands to mountainous regions. Finally, New England’s weather arrives predominantly from the west brought by a large upper level wind current known as the prevailing Westerlies that moves across the United Sates and southern Canada. The area averages 35 to 55 inches of total precipitation a year (with higher totals usually observed in the mountain areas). The region’s growing season can be as long as 180 days in southern New England to as little as 120 days in the more northern parts.The Changing New England Landscape: Since the arrival of the first European settlers some 400 years ago, the landscape of New England has undergone significant changes. Forests were more extensive in pre-colonial New England. Large areas of forest surrounding Native American settlements (particularly those along the coast) had a much more open feel to them and were park like in appearance. These areas had little underbrush as the native peoples regularly set fires as a means of controlling its growth. This helped to make travel and hunting less difficult. It was also useful in maintaining open the lands used for planting crops. The low population density of Native Americans (experts put the number at no more than 100,000) coupled with how they viewed and used the land helped to minimize their impact on the environment. Europeans began to settle in the region in the early 1600’s. The way the forests were used by the colonists differed dramatically from that of Native Americans. This difference in the way the land was viewed and utilized had a significant impact on the ecology of the region. The colonists quickly cleared large portions of forest. The primary driving force for clearing forestlands was agriculture. As the population continued to grow, additional forestlands were cleared to provide more land for agriculture as well as grazing lands for livestock. The colonists saw in these forests an unlimited supply of timber. They favored wooden fences over stonewalls. Stonewalls which we have come to think of as a quintessential element of the New England landscape, were used only after the favored lumber for fence building became too scarce and expensive to continue using. In addition, timber also supplied heating and cooking fuel. A typical colonial household might burn as much as 30 to 50 cords of wood a year in this endeavor.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments; Introduction; About New England and its Flora; Map; How to Use this Book; White Flowers; Pink and Red Flowers; Yellow and Orange Flowers; Blue and Purple Flowers; Green, Brown, and Inconspicuous Flowers; Grasses, Sedges and Rushes; Glossary; Selected Reading; About the Author

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)